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Tuesday, May 21
 

8:00am

Networking Coffee
Tuesday May 21, 2019 8:00am - 9:00am
Salle Pas Perdus (Lobby)

8:00am

Registration Open
Tuesday May 21, 2019 8:00am - 6:30pm
Salle Pas Perdus (Lobby)

9:00am

Learning Fast & Small - Nourishing Company-wide Agility in a Skeptical Environment (Jutta Eckstein, Deepti Jain)

Abstract:
Agile beyond IT and beyond just doing it, but rather being it requires experimenting continuously in order to learn continuously. Thus more important than failing fast is learning fast.
In this workshop we will learn what learning fast means for every individual and the organization as a whole and we will define experiments for you to use in your company for becoming agile truly. This will allow you to create an environment for continuous innovations, an environment where everyone is an entrepreneur!
In this workshop we will also make use of examples that make:
  • the organizational structure (hierarchy?) more agile
  • the organizational processes faster so that they enable innovation
  • the organizational strategy better aligned with current needs so that your organization is able to drive the market instead of being driven by the market

Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn how to conceive of and conduct entrepreneurial experiments, how to learn from them, and how to scale them
  • Understand the prerequisites for creating your own experiments
  • Learn how to design experiments dependent on the outcome you aim for in respect to the environment you are in
  • Understand that everyone in an organization can foster learning (faster)
  • Develop strategies for the application in your own context


Speakers
avatar for Jutta ECKSTEIN

Jutta ECKSTEIN

Independent Coach, consultant, trainer and speaker
Jutta works as an independent coach, consultant, trainer, author, and speaker. She has helped many teams and organizations worldwide to make an agile transition. She has a unique experience in applying agile processes within medium-sized to large distributed mission-critical projects... Read More →
avatar for Deepti Jain

Deepti Jain

Agile Transformation Strategist, AgileVirgin
Deepti is an Agile practitioner, experienced in creating, leading, and managing an Agile team in a distributed setup. She is active in Agile community building in India via her initiatives and events. For the past 6 years, her primary focus is on Agile and its Scaling with Continuous... Read More →


Tuesday May 21, 2019 9:00am - 10:30am
E-4024 (4th Floor)

9:00am

Analysis for Agilists (Michael Bolton)
Abstract:
  • How do we go about understanding something complex?
  • How do we move from confusion to clarity?
  • What strategies and approaches can we use to identify and reason about things that matter?
  • When we’re dropped into a development or testing situation, how do we make sense of it all?
  • How can we rapidly achieve a deeper understanding of things that we know little or nothing about?
  • How do we anticipate and manage product, project, and business risk?
  • How can we develop skills to make us more powerful analysts, developers, testers, and critics?
Analysis – the study of things and ideas by examining their elements and structures — is a way of developing answers to all of these questions. Analysis is central to development and testing, yet not always well studied, discussed, or understood. Analysis can be quick and shallow, slower and deeper, narrowly or broadly focused, formal or informal.

In this one-day workshop, we'll engage in exercises and discussions that highlight ways of analyzing
  • Products
  • Technologies
  • Systems
  • Language
  • Test conditions
  • Risk
  • Social groups
  • Problems
  • Strategies
  • Analysis itself!

Learning Outcomes:
  • Participants may develop insights into
  • Sensemaking; how and why we go about analysis
  • Factoring; identify elements and dimensions that might make a difference
  • Modeling; representing complex things with useful simplifications
  • Revealing and managing assumptions
  • Geometric analysis; patterns, groupings, intervals, boundaries, symmetries…
  • Linguistic analysis; structures of what’s there and what’s missing in the ways we speak
  • General Systems Thinking; the role of the observer; aggregation; decomposition
  • Critical thinking: how might we be fooling ourselves? How can we defend against that?


Speakers
avatar for Michael Bolton

Michael Bolton

Consulting Software Tester, DevelopSense
Michael Bolton is a consulting software tester and testing teacher who helps people to solve testing problems that they didn’t realize they could solve. He is the co-author (with senior author James Bach) of Rapid Software Testing, a methodology and mindset for testing software... Read More →



Tuesday May 21, 2019 9:00am - 10:30am
E-2025 (2nd Floor)

9:00am

Experience the Kanban Policy Game - Improving Performance Through Evolutionary Change (Jason Newberg, Rakshinda Aslam)

Abstract:
The Kanban Method emphasizes the importance of policies considerably. In the service delivery principles, “Your organization is an ecosystem of interdependent services steered by its policies, reflect regularly on their effectiveness and improve them.” So, instead of viewing our processes as a sequence of activities, workflows, roles and responsibilities, we view the existing processes as sets of policies and define those policies explicitly. The fourth practice of the Kanban Method asks us to “Make policies explicit", allowing the policies to be challenged and changed.

The Kanban Policy Game is a fun way to experience how policies affect productivity (i.e. number of work items produced per unit time). The game has rules and policies. Rules are fixed and cannot be changed, but the policies evolve experimentally.

In the game we act as an Agile coach hired to improve the performance of teams in the client organization. The game has three iterations.
  • In the first iteration we make our three policies explicit: “Collaboration Policy”, “Pull Policy” and “WIP Policy”. We want to understand and measure the current state of the system. We discover that the organization measures individual productivity and wants their "resources" to be fully utilized.
  • In the second iteration we change only the “WIP Policy” by limiting the work in process.
  • In the third iteration we change only the “Collaboration Policy”. From now on the organization will not measure individual productivity but the performance of a team as a whole.

"When you want to make a change, first, make the change easy. (Warning, this may be hard.) Then make the easy change.” ~ Kent Beck

This session is targeted for practicing agile team members, managers, and coaches.
Kanban Policy Game created by Dimitar Bakardzhiev is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License
Featureban is a game created by Mike Burrows and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution- ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Learning Outcomes:
  • “Collaboration Policy”, “Performance Evaluation Policy” and “WIP Policy” have huge impact on productivity.
  • The J-curve effect can be experienced if we limit WIP in an organization where collaboration level is low.
  • Limiting WIP when we measure individual performance has a negative effect on the productivity of the team as a whole.
  • Limiting WIP when we don't measure individual performance has a positive effect on the productivity of the team as a whole.
  • The collaboration level in a team can be measured.
  • Policy changes are cheap and have huge effect on productivity.
  • What a Kanban system looks like and how to apply the 6 practices (Visualize invisible knowledge work, Limit WIP, Manage Flow, Make policies explicit, Implement feedback loops, Improve collaboratively - evolve experimentally)


Speakers
avatar for Jason Newberg

Jason Newberg

JPMorgan Chase
Jason Newberg is member of a team of coaches in Global Technology at JPMorgan Chase focused on enabling organizational and business agility at every level of the organization. Jason’s approach to coaching is grounded in the principles of Socio-Technical Systems theory with a focus... Read More →



Tuesday May 21, 2019 9:00am - 10:30am
E-4025 (4th Floor)

9:00am

Surviving Legacy Code (J. B. Rainsberger)

Abstract:
Working with legacy code remains difficult. We feel afraid to change it, but sometimes we have no choice. Learn key techniques to help you manage your risk. J. B. Rainsberger gives you a safe code base in which to experiment and he guides you through the confusing risk/reward decisions involved in living with legacy code. You will learn and practise several specific, safe techniques that you can start using on your own legacy code once you return to your project.

You should attend this workshop if you have code that seems impossible to change, code that you feel really uncomfortable changing, or you want to avoid creating code like that in the future. J. B.’s advice transcends business domains and programming languages. Moreover, you get to find out how he thinks through the tough choices as well as improve the design with (relative) grace and ease.

After learning a technique, it’s your turn to try it out for yourself. All you need is a working development environment for your favorite programming language and to install git. (Strictly speaking, you don’t even need to do that, but you probably should.) If you get stuck, then J. B. helps you get moving again. If something seems strange, then J. B. helps you make sense of it–or maybe he agrees that it’s strange and you should try something else.

Learning Outcomes:
  • See the central conflict in working with legacy code: I want to add tests to refactor safely, but I need to refactor to add tests at a reasonable cost.
  • Learn how to add tests quickly to existing code using the text-based output that the system already produces.
  • Learn 4 key design techniques that help address the central conflict of legacy code.
  • Learn the core principles of rescuing legacy code: optimize for safety, document everything, embrace imperfection, play the long game, you can't chase all the rabbits.
  • Learn how to maintain focus in the inherently distracting environment of rescuing legacy code.
  • Learn how to work more harmoniously with people in the inherently frustrating and anxiety-inducing atmosphere of legacy systems.
  • Have a few tricks to start using immediately when returning to work in addition to some longer-term plans for improvement.


Speakers
avatar for J. B. Rainsberger

J. B. Rainsberger

Trusted Adviser, jbrains.ca
J. B. Rainsberger helps software companies better satisfy their customers and the businesses they support. Over the years, he has learned to write valuable software, turned himself into a joy to work with, and built a life that he loves. He has traveled the world sharing what he’s... Read More →


Tuesday May 21, 2019 9:00am - 10:30am
E-2022 (2nd Floor)

9:00am

Virginia Satir's Ingredients of an Interaction (Emmanuel Gaillot)

Abstract:
"No matter how it looks at first, it's always a people problem."
-- G. Weinberg.

Even when we value "individuals and interactions over processes and tools," things don't always go as smoothly as we'd like them to. In the course of an interaction with teammates, clients or managers, we (and others) sometimes act and react in manners that surprise us and go beyond our understanding. This is troublesome, because when it happens we might lock ourselves and other people involved in the interaction into a loop that can be damaging on many levels – personal (lowering self-esteem), interpersonal (hurting a relationship) and professional (bringing poor results). In this introductory session, we'll explore such situations through exercises based on a model developed by Virginia Satir, hoping to get a better grasp at what's going on – and maybe change the course of the interaction for the better.
This will be an experiential session. Attendees will be invited (though not required) to participate into hands-on activities, introspect and share their inner experience.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Get a deep understanding of Virginia Satir's Ingredients of an Interaction model, and its applicability in the workplace and daily life
  • Learn about yourself: get insights about how you're interacting with others, what makes you feel comfortable and what derails you
  • Learn how to inject choices in the interaction, how to step out from automatic pilot into more fulfilling, respectful and connecting behaviors


Speakers

Tuesday May 21, 2019 9:00am - 10:30am
E-2023 (2nd Floor)

9:00am

Workshop: Architecture in an Agile World (Dennis Mancl, Steven Fraser, Werner Wild)

Abstract:
The world is moving faster than ever, and our software development techniques are struggling to keep up. We feel we need to have an agile feature set, but without a well-defined and understandable architecture, we feel like everything is in chaos. How do we manage the balance between architecture and agility?

This half-day workshop will be an exploration of the issues and obstacles doing agile development in an environment where we also need to have a sound architecture. Some of the issues are "cultural" -- how to get architects and agilists to communicate and work together effectively. Other issues are technical -- building the right lightweight architectural artifacts that still permit developers to explore and experiment. The workshop will create a report based on the conclusions of the workshop participants.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understanding some of the risks and opportunities of blending agile and architecture-driven methods
  • Learn how architects establish credibility with agile development team members and how agilists can negotiate with architects
  • Discover some of the “good practices” that should be part of the toolkit of agilists and architects



Speakers
avatar for Steven Fraser

Steven Fraser

Impresario & Principal Consultant, Innoxec (Innovation Executive Services)
Steven Fraser is based in Silicon Valley and has served as an innovation catalyst with global influence for HP, Cisco, Qualcomm, and Nortel. In addition to a year as a Visiting Scientist at Carnegie Mellon University’s Software Engineering Institute (SEI) consulting on domain engineering... Read More →
avatar for Dennis Mancl

Dennis Mancl

MSWX Software Experts
Dennis worked in software development in telecom for many years - he is an advocate for agile methods, and he has been involved in coaching for requirements modeling, software architecture planning, and legacy software techniques.
avatar for Werner Wild

Werner Wild

CEO, EVOLUTION(R)
Agile & Lean in Practice


Tuesday May 21, 2019 9:00am - 10:30am
E-2024 (2nd Floor)

10:30am

Break
Tuesday May 21, 2019 10:30am - 11:00am
Salle Pas Perdus (Lobby)

11:00am

Learning Fast & Small (continued) - Nourishing Company-wide Agility in a Skeptical Environment (Jutta Eckstein, Deepti Jain)

Abstract:
Agile beyond IT and beyond just doing it, but rather being it requires experimenting continuously in order to learn continuously. Thus more important than failing fast is learning fast.
In this workshop we will learn what learning fast means for every individual and the organization as a whole and we will define experiments for you to use in your company for becoming agile truly. This will allow you to create an environment for continuous innovations, an environment where everyone is an entrepreneur!
In this workshop we will also make use of examples that make:
  • the organizational structure (hierarchy?) more agile
  • the organizational processes faster so that they enable innovation
  • the organizational strategy better aligned with current needs so that your organization is able to drive the market instead of being driven by the market

Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn how to conceive of and conduct entrepreneurial experiments, how to learn from them, and how to scale them
  • Understand the prerequisites for creating your own experiments
  • Learn how to design experiments dependent on the outcome you aim for in respect to the environment you are in
  • Understand that everyone in an organization can foster learning (faster)
  • Develop strategies for the application in your own context


Speakers
avatar for Jutta ECKSTEIN

Jutta ECKSTEIN

Independent Coach, consultant, trainer and speaker
Jutta works as an independent coach, consultant, trainer, author, and speaker. She has helped many teams and organizations worldwide to make an agile transition. She has a unique experience in applying agile processes within medium-sized to large distributed mission-critical projects... Read More →
avatar for Deepti Jain

Deepti Jain

Agile Transformation Strategist, AgileVirgin
Deepti is an Agile practitioner, experienced in creating, leading, and managing an Agile team in a distributed setup. She is active in Agile community building in India via her initiatives and events. For the past 6 years, her primary focus is on Agile and its Scaling with Continuous... Read More →


Tuesday May 21, 2019 11:00am - 12:30pm
E-4024 (4th Floor)

11:00am

Analysis for Agilists (continued) (Michael Bolton)
Abstract:
  • How do we go about understanding something complex?
  • How do we move from confusion to clarity?
  • What strategies and approaches can we use to identify and reason about things that matter?
  • When we’re dropped into a development or testing situation, how do we make sense of it all?
  • How can we rapidly achieve a deeper understanding of things that we know little or nothing about?
  • How do we anticipate and manage product, project, and business risk?
  • How can we develop skills to make us more powerful analysts, developers, testers, and critics?
Analysis – the study of things and ideas by examining their elements and structures — is a way of developing answers to all of these questions. Analysis is central to development and testing, yet not always well studied, discussed, or understood. Analysis can be quick and shallow, slower and deeper, narrowly or broadly focused, formal or informal.

In this one-day workshop, we'll engage in exercises and discussions that highlight ways of analyzing
  • Products
  • Technologies
  • Systems
  • Language
  • Test conditions
  • Risk
  • Social groups
  • Problems
  • Strategies
  • Analysis itself!

Learning Outcomes:
  • Participants may develop insights into
  • Sensemaking; how and why we go about analysis
  • Factoring; identify elements and dimensions that might make a difference
  • Modeling; representing complex things with useful simplifications
  • Revealing and managing assumptions
  • Geometric analysis; patterns, groupings, intervals, boundaries, symmetries…
  • Linguistic analysis; structures of what’s there and what’s missing in the ways we speak
  • General Systems Thinking; the role of the observer; aggregation; decomposition
  • Critical thinking: how might we be fooling ourselves? How can we defend against that?


Speakers
avatar for Michael Bolton

Michael Bolton

Consulting Software Tester, DevelopSense
Michael Bolton is a consulting software tester and testing teacher who helps people to solve testing problems that they didn’t realize they could solve. He is the co-author (with senior author James Bach) of Rapid Software Testing, a methodology and mindset for testing software... Read More →


Tuesday May 21, 2019 11:00am - 12:30pm
E-2025 (2nd Floor)

11:00am

Experience the Kanban Policy Game (continued) - Improving Performance Through Evolutionary Change (Jason Newberg, Rakshinda Aslam))

Abstract:
The Kanban Method emphasizes the importance of policies considerably. In the service delivery principles, “Your organization is an ecosystem of interdependent services steered by its policies, reflect regularly on their effectiveness and improve them.” So, instead of viewing our processes as a sequence of activities, workflows, roles and responsibilities, we view the existing processes as sets of policies and define those policies explicitly. The fourth practice of the Kanban Method asks us to “Make policies explicit", allowing the policies to be challenged and changed.

The Kanban Policy Game is a fun way to experience how policies affect productivity (i.e. number of work items produced per unit time). The game has rules and policies. Rules are fixed and cannot be changed, but the policies evolve experimentally.

In the game we act as an Agile coach hired to improve the performance of teams in the client organization. The game has three iterations.
  • In the first iteration we make our three policies explicit: “Collaboration Policy”, “Pull Policy” and “WIP Policy”. We want to understand and measure the current state of the system. We discover that the organization measures individual productivity and wants their "resources" to be fully utilized.
  • In the second iteration we change only the “WIP Policy” by limiting the work in process.
  • In the third iteration we change only the “Collaboration Policy”. From now on the organization will not measure individual productivity but the performance of a team as a whole.

"When you want to make a change, first, make the change easy. (Warning, this may be hard.) Then make the easy change.” ~ Kent Beck

This session is targeted for practicing agile team members, managers, and coaches.
Kanban Policy Game created by Dimitar Bakardzhiev is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License
Featureban is a game created by Mike Burrows and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution- ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Learning Outcomes:
  • “Collaboration Policy”, “Performance Evaluation Policy” and “WIP Policy” have huge impact on productivity.
  • The J-curve effect can be experienced if we limit WIP in an organization where collaboration level is low.
  • Limiting WIP when we measure individual performance has a negative effect on the productivity of the team as a whole.
  • Limiting WIP when we don't measure individual performance has a positive effect on the productivity of the team as a whole.
  • The collaboration level in a team can be measured.
  • Policy changes are cheap and have huge effect on productivity.
  • What a Kanban system looks like and how to apply the 6 practices (Visualize invisible knowledge work, Limit WIP, Manage Flow, Make policies explicit, Implement feedback loops, Improve collaboratively - evolve experimentally)


Speakers
avatar for Jason Newberg

Jason Newberg

JPMorgan Chase
Jason Newberg is member of a team of coaches in Global Technology at JPMorgan Chase focused on enabling organizational and business agility at every level of the organization. Jason’s approach to coaching is grounded in the principles of Socio-Technical Systems theory with a focus... Read More →


Tuesday May 21, 2019 11:00am - 12:30pm
E-4025 (4th Floor)

11:00am

Surviving Legacy Code (continued) (J. B. Rainsberger)

Abstract:
Working with legacy code remains difficult. We feel afraid to change it, but sometimes we have no choice.
Learn key techniques to help you manage your risk. J. B. Rainsberger gives you a safe code base in which to experiment and he guides you through the confusing risk/reward decisions involved in living with legacy code. You will learn and practise several specific, safe techniques that you can start using on your own legacy code once you return to your project.
You should attend this workshop if you have code that seems impossible to change, code that you feel really uncomfortable changing, or you want to avoid creating code like that in the future. J. B.’s advice transcends business domains and programming languages. Moreover, you get to find out how he thinks through the tough choices as well as improve the design with (relative) grace and ease.
After learning a technique, it’s your turn to try it out for yourself. All you need is a working development environment for your favorite programming language and to install git. (Strictly speaking, you don’t even need to do that, but you probably should.) If you get stuck, then J. B. helps you get moving again. If something seems strange, then J. B. helps you make sense of it–or maybe he agrees that it’s strange and you should try something else.

Learning Outcomes:
  • See the central conflict in working with legacy code: I want to add tests to refactor safely, but I need to refactor to add tests at a reasonable cost.
  • Learn how to add tests quickly to existing code using the text-based output that the system already produces.
  • Learn 4 key design techniques that help address the central conflict of legacy code.
  • Learn the core principles of rescuing legacy code: optimize for safety, document everything, embrace imperfection, play the long game, you can't chase all the rabbits.
  • Learn how to maintain focus in the inherently distracting environment of rescuing legacy code.
  • Learn how to work more harmoniously with people in the inherently frustrating and anxiety-inducing atmosphere of legacy systems.
  • Have a few tricks to start using immediately when returning to work in addition to some longer-term plans for improvement.


Speakers
avatar for J. B. Rainsberger

J. B. Rainsberger

Trusted Adviser, jbrains.ca
J. B. Rainsberger helps software companies better satisfy their customers and the businesses they support. Over the years, he has learned to write valuable software, turned himself into a joy to work with, and built a life that he loves. He has traveled the world sharing what he’s... Read More →


Tuesday May 21, 2019 11:00am - 12:30pm
E-2022 (2nd Floor)

11:00am

Virginia Satir's Ingredients of an Interaction (continued) (Emmanuel Gaillot)

Abstract:
"No matter how it looks at first, it's always a people problem."
-- G. Weinberg.

Even when we value "individuals and interactions over processes and tools," things don't always go as smoothly as we'd like them to. In the course of an interaction with teammates, clients or managers, we (and others) sometimes act and react in manners that surprise us and go beyond our understanding. This is troublesome, because when it happens we might lock ourselves and other people involved in the interaction into a loop that can be damaging on many levels – personal (lowering self-esteem), interpersonal (hurting a relationship) and professional (bringing poor results). In this introductory session, we'll explore such situations through exercises based on a model developed by Virginia Satir, hoping to get a better grasp at what's going on – and maybe change the course of the interaction for the better.
This will be an experiential session. Attendees will be invited (though not required) to participate into hands-on activities, introspect and share their inner experience.

Learning Outcomes:
  • - Get a deep understanding of Virginia Satir's Ingredients of an Interaction model, and its applicability in the workplace and daily life
  • - Learn about yourself: get insights about how you're interacting with others, what makes you feel comfortable and what derails you
  • - Learn how to inject choices in the interaction, how to step out from automatic pilot into more fulfilling, respectful and connecting behaviors


Speakers

Tuesday May 21, 2019 11:00am - 12:30pm
E-2023 (2nd Floor)

11:00am

Workshop: Architecture in an Agile World (continued) (Dennis Mancl, Steven Fraser, Werner Wild)

Abstract:
The world is moving faster than ever, and our software development techniques are struggling to keep up. We feel we need to have an agile feature set, but without a well-defined and understandable architecture, we feel like everything is in chaos. How do we manage the balance between architecture and agility?

This half-day workshop will be an exploration of the issues and obstacles doing agile development in an environment where we also need to have a sound architecture. Some of the issues are "cultural" -- how to get architects and agilists to communicate and work together effectively. Other issues are technical -- building the right lightweight architectural artifacts that still permit developers to explore and experiment. The workshop will create a final report based on the conclusions of the workshop participants.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understanding some of the risks and opportunities of blending agile and architecture-driven methods
  • Learn how architects establish credibility with agile development team members and how agilists can negotiate with architects
  • Discover some of the “good practices” that should be part of the toolkit of agilists and architects



Speakers
avatar for Werner Wild

Werner Wild

CEO, EVOLUTION(R)
Agile & Lean in Practice
avatar for Dennis Mancl

Dennis Mancl

MSWX Software Experts
Dennis worked in software development in telecom for many years - he is an advocate for agile methods, and he has been involved in coaching for requirements modeling, software architecture planning, and legacy software techniques.
avatar for Steven Fraser

Steven Fraser

Impresario & Principal Consultant, Innoxec (Innovation Executive Services)
Steven Fraser is based in Silicon Valley and has served as an innovation catalyst with global influence for HP, Cisco, Qualcomm, and Nortel. In addition to a year as a Visiting Scientist at Carnegie Mellon University’s Software Engineering Institute (SEI) consulting on domain engineering... Read More →


Tuesday May 21, 2019 11:00am - 12:30pm
E-2024 (2nd Floor)

12:30pm

Lunch
Tuesday May 21, 2019 12:30pm - 1:30pm
Salle Pas Perdus (Lobby)

1:30pm

Learning Fast & Small (continued) - Nourishing Company-wide Agility in a Skeptical Environment (Jutta Eckstein, Deepti Jain)

Abstract:
Agile beyond IT and beyond just doing it, but rather being it requires experimenting continuously in order to learn continuously. Thus more important than failing fast is learning fast.
In this workshop we will learn what learning fast means for every individual and the organization as a whole and we will define experiments for you to use in your company for becoming agile truly. This will allow you to create an environment for continuous innovations, an environment where everyone is an entrepreneur!
In this workshop we will also make use of examples that make:
  • the organizational structure (hierarchy?) more agile
  • the organizational processes faster so that they enable innovation
  • the organizational strategy better aligned with current needs so that your organization is able to drive the market instead of being driven by the market

Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn how to conceive of and conduct entrepreneurial experiments, how to learn from them, and how to scale them
  • Understand the prerequisites for creating your own experiments
  • Learn how to design experiments dependent on the outcome you aim for in respect to the environment you are in
  • Understand that everyone in an organization can foster learning (faster)
  • Develop strategies for the application in your own context


Speakers
avatar for Jutta ECKSTEIN

Jutta ECKSTEIN

Independent Coach, consultant, trainer and speaker
Jutta works as an independent coach, consultant, trainer, author, and speaker. She has helped many teams and organizations worldwide to make an agile transition. She has a unique experience in applying agile processes within medium-sized to large distributed mission-critical projects... Read More →
avatar for Deepti Jain

Deepti Jain

Agile Transformation Strategist, AgileVirgin
Deepti is an Agile practitioner, experienced in creating, leading, and managing an Agile team in a distributed setup. She is active in Agile community building in India via her initiatives and events. For the past 6 years, her primary focus is on Agile and its Scaling with Continuous... Read More →


Tuesday May 21, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm
E-4024 (4th Floor)

1:30pm

Analysis for Agilists (continued) (Michael Bolton)
Abstract:
  • How do we go about understanding something complex?
  • How do we move from confusion to clarity?
  • What strategies and approaches can we use to identify and reason about things that matter?
  • When we’re dropped into a development or testing situation, how do we make sense of it all?
  • How can we rapidly achieve a deeper understanding of things that we know little or nothing about?
  • How do we anticipate and manage product, project, and business risk?
  • How can we develop skills to make us more powerful analysts, developers, testers, and critics?
Analysis – the study of things and ideas by examining their elements and structures — is a way of developing answers to all of these questions. Analysis is central to development and testing, yet not always well studied, discussed, or understood. Analysis can be quick and shallow, slower and deeper, narrowly or broadly focused, formal or informal.

In this one-day workshop, we'll engage in exercises and discussions that highlight ways of analyzing
  • Products
  • Technologies
  • Systems
  • Language
  • Test conditions
  • Risk
  • Social groups
  • Problems
  • Strategies
  • Analysis itself!

Learning Outcomes:
  • Participants may develop insights into
  • Sensemaking; how and why we go about analysis
  • Factoring; identify elements and dimensions that might make a difference
  • Modeling; representing complex things with useful simplifications
  • Revealing and managing assumptions
  • Geometric analysis; patterns, groupings, intervals, boundaries, symmetries…
  • Linguistic analysis; structures of what’s there and what’s missing in the ways we speak
  • General Systems Thinking; the role of the observer; aggregation; decomposition
  • Critical thinking: how might we be fooling ourselves? How can we defend against that?


Speakers
avatar for Michael Bolton

Michael Bolton

Consulting Software Tester, DevelopSense
Michael Bolton is a consulting software tester and testing teacher who helps people to solve testing problems that they didn’t realize they could solve. He is the co-author (with senior author James Bach) of Rapid Software Testing, a methodology and mindset for testing software... Read More →


Tuesday May 21, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm
E-2025 (2nd Floor)

1:30pm

Powerful Observational Techniques For Coaching Teams (Sunny Dhillon)
Abstract:
Starting out as a new agile coach is difficult. Where do you go? How do you start? Learn to leverage a structured approach to coaching that defines a way to prepare and execute coaching activities by starting from Observations and moving on by identifying what behavioral Goals, as coaches, we would like the coachee(s) to achieve.

The only way to improve a situation through coaching is by helping improving the behavior of the people involved, that will allow to establish a sustainable and long lasting change. As coaches, our opinions and unconscious biases can mislead or misdirect those we are coaching. This bias happens when an observer expresses their thoughts and expectations about a situation through tone, word choice, and body language in a way that influences how the people they are observing behave.
Right about now, you’re probably thinking “Well I wouldn’t do that! I’m a professional!” and there is bad news for you. We all do it. Because it’s largely unconscious, we can’t help it. Therefore, it is important that we are aware and careful of this effect. Lets leverage a structure that helps us avoid jumping ahead of ourselves in coaching.

You will uncover innovative and a structured approach to coaching which aims at limiting or negating the impact of any observer bias we might bring to the table whilst improving team performance. Through a structured approach, coaches and scrum masters will be able to better target their efforts and create demonstrable improvement in teams.
Attendees will leave this session with a structured approach to guide their ongoing coaching efforts and share those experiences with others in the organization.
Target Audience: Scrum Masters, Agile Coaches, Executives, Managers and Agile Leaders.

Learning Outcomes:
  1. To be able to explain the Team Coaching framework.
  2. Apply different techniques in observational coaching.
  3. Learn to avoid observer bias in your coaching.
  4.  Learn to apply tools and techniques on building a coaching culture in your organisation.
  5. You will demonstrate on how to create transparency in your coaching.
  6.  Learn to inspect and adapt in your coaching.


Speakers
avatar for sunny dhillon

sunny dhillon

Agile Coach, agile42
Sunny graduated with a Masters in Computer Science in the year 2000. Sunny’s developed software in many different industries including investment banking, retail banking, e-commerce and health care in the two decades since. Major projects included PayPal integration for Best Buy... Read More →



Tuesday May 21, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm
E-2023 (2nd Floor)

1:30pm

Run Design Sprints like Google (contined) (Judith Sol-Dyess)
Abstract:
The promise of a Design Sprint is simple — and valuable. In just five days, you can learn whether an idea is worthwhile or not. Imagine the effort, time and money that you could save by using a Product Design Sprint to find out in one week whether a product, feature or process was really going to work for users. Instead of devoting months of production work to a hypothesis, you can test it immediately and move forward with facts.

The Google Design Sprint process was developed by the company's investment arm, Google Ventures, to quickly assess whether an idea was worthy of their funding. Today, we've used the Design Sprint framework to help companies at all stages of the product development process validate their work and build with confidence.

In this Google Design Sprint Workshop, you'll learn the skills to bring your ideas to life and put them in front of users in one workweek. We'll walk you through each step of the Product Design Sprint Process, from brainstorming, to prototyping, to testing on real users, to synthesizing the results, so you can bring a new level of proof to all of your projects.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Apply design thinking concepts to a business problem
  • Rapidly collaborate with a team to find solutions
  • Familiarity with the Google Design Sprint process
  • Ability to participate in or facilitate a Google Design Sprint
  • Techniques for turning business ideas into concrete problem statements
  • Techniques for facilitating various decision activities
  • Lightweight sketching and prototyping
  • Hands-on experience interviewing users
  • Learn to value and embrace “failing fast”

Speakers
avatar for Judith Sol-Dyess

Judith Sol-Dyess

Senior Project Strategist, Table XI
I'm a project strategist who, probably like you, wears many hats: project manager, product manager, scrum master and agile transformation coach for my clients. I really enjoy the work I do, and the people I get to meet along the way. I help teams work better together and deliver value... Read More →



Tuesday May 21, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm
E-4025 (4th Floor)

1:30pm

Surviving Legacy Code (continued) (J. B. Rainsberger)

Abstract:
Working with legacy code remains difficult. We feel afraid to change it, but sometimes we have no choice.
Learn key techniques to help you manage your risk. J. B. Rainsberger gives you a safe code base in which to experiment and he guides you through the confusing risk/reward decisions involved in living with legacy code. You will learn and practise several specific, safe techniques that you can start using on your own legacy code once you return to your project.
You should attend this workshop if you have code that seems impossible to change, code that you feel really uncomfortable changing, or you want to avoid creating code like that in the future. J. B.’s advice transcends business domains and programming languages. Moreover, you get to find out how he thinks through the tough choices as well as improve the design with (relative) grace and ease.
After learning a technique, it’s your turn to try it out for yourself. All you need is a working development environment for your favorite programming language and to install git. (Strictly speaking, you don’t even need to do that, but you probably should.) If you get stuck, then J. B. helps you get moving again. If something seems strange, then J. B. helps you make sense of it–or maybe he agrees that it’s strange and you should try something else.

Learning Outcomes:
  • See the central conflict in working with legacy code: I want to add tests to refactor safely, but I need to refactor to add tests at a reasonable cost.
  • Learn how to add tests quickly to existing code using the text-based output that the system already produces.
  • Learn 4 key design techniques that help address the central conflict of legacy code.
  • Learn the core principles of rescuing legacy code: optimize for safety, document everything, embrace imperfection, play the long game, you can't chase all the rabbits.
  • Learn how to maintain focus in the inherently distracting environment of rescuing legacy code.
  • Learn how to work more harmoniously with people in the inherently frustrating and anxiety-inducing atmosphere of legacy systems.
  • Have a few tricks to start using immediately when returning to work in addition to some longer-term plans for improvement.


Speakers
avatar for J. B. Rainsberger

J. B. Rainsberger

Trusted Adviser, jbrains.ca
J. B. Rainsberger helps software companies better satisfy their customers and the businesses they support. Over the years, he has learned to write valuable software, turned himself into a joy to work with, and built a life that he loves. He has traveled the world sharing what he’s... Read More →


Tuesday May 21, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm
E-2022 (2nd Floor)

3:00pm

Break
Tuesday May 21, 2019 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Salle Pas Perdus (Lobby)

3:30pm

Learning Fast & Small (continued) - Nourishing Company-wide Agility in a Skeptical Environment (Jutta Eckstein, Deepti Jain)

Abstract:
Agile beyond IT and beyond just doing it, but rather being it requires experimenting continuously in order to learn continuously. Thus more important than failing fast is learning fast.
In this workshop we will learn what learning fast means for every individual and the organization as a whole and we will define experiments for you to use in your company for becoming agile truly. This will allow you to create an environment for continuous innovations, an environment where everyone is an entrepreneur!
In this workshop we will also make use of examples that make:
  • the organizational structure (hierarchy?) more agile
  • the organizational processes faster so that they enable innovation
  • the organizational strategy better aligned with current needs so that your organization is able to drive the market instead of being driven by the market

Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn how to conceive of and conduct entrepreneurial experiments, how to learn from them, and how to scale them
  • Understand the prerequisites for creating your own experiments
  • Learn how to design experiments dependent on the outcome you aim for in respect to the environment you are in
  • Understand that everyone in an organization can foster learning (faster)
  • Develop strategies for the application in your own context


Speakers
avatar for Jutta ECKSTEIN

Jutta ECKSTEIN

Independent Coach, consultant, trainer and speaker
Jutta works as an independent coach, consultant, trainer, author, and speaker. She has helped many teams and organizations worldwide to make an agile transition. She has a unique experience in applying agile processes within medium-sized to large distributed mission-critical projects... Read More →
avatar for Deepti Jain

Deepti Jain

Agile Transformation Strategist, AgileVirgin
Deepti is an Agile practitioner, experienced in creating, leading, and managing an Agile team in a distributed setup. She is active in Agile community building in India via her initiatives and events. For the past 6 years, her primary focus is on Agile and its Scaling with Continuous... Read More →


Tuesday May 21, 2019 3:30pm - 5:00pm
E-4024 (4th Floor)

3:30pm

Analysis for Agilists (continued) (Michael Bolton)
Abstract:
  • How do we go about understanding something complex?
  • How do we move from confusion to clarity?
  • What strategies and approaches can we use to identify and reason about things that matter?
  • When we’re dropped into a development or testing situation, how do we make sense of it all?
  • How can we rapidly achieve a deeper understanding of things that we know little or nothing about?
  • How do we anticipate and manage product, project, and business risk?
  • How can we develop skills to make us more powerful analysts, developers, testers, and critics?
Analysis – the study of things and ideas by examining their elements and structures — is a way of developing answers to all of these questions. Analysis is central to development and testing, yet not always well studied, discussed, or understood. Analysis can be quick and shallow, slower and deeper, narrowly or broadly focused, formal or informal.

In this one-day workshop, we'll engage in exercises and discussions that highlight ways of analyzing
  • Products
  • Technologies
  • Systems
  • Language
  • Test conditions
  • Risk
  • Social groups
  • Problems
  • Strategies
  • Analysis itself!

Learning Outcomes:
  • Participants may develop insights into
  • Sensemaking; how and why we go about analysis
  • Factoring; identify elements and dimensions that might make a difference
  • Modeling; representing complex things with useful simplifications
  • Revealing and managing assumptions
  • Geometric analysis; patterns, groupings, intervals, boundaries, symmetries…
  • Linguistic analysis; structures of what’s there and what’s missing in the ways we speak
  • General Systems Thinking; the role of the observer; aggregation; decomposition
  • Critical thinking: how might we be fooling ourselves? How can we defend against that?


Speakers
avatar for Michael Bolton

Michael Bolton

Consulting Software Tester, DevelopSense
Michael Bolton is a consulting software tester and testing teacher who helps people to solve testing problems that they didn’t realize they could solve. He is the co-author (with senior author James Bach) of Rapid Software Testing, a methodology and mindset for testing software... Read More →


Tuesday May 21, 2019 3:30pm - 5:00pm
E-2025 (2nd Floor)

3:30pm

Run Design Sprints like Google (continued) (Judith Sol-Dyess)
Abstract:
The promise of a Design Sprint is simple — and valuable. In just five days, you can learn whether an idea is worthwhile or not. Imagine the effort, time and money that you could save by using a Product Design Sprint to find out in one week whether a product, feature or process was really going to work for users. Instead of devoting months of production work to a hypothesis, you can test it immediately and move forward with facts.

The Google Design Sprint process was developed by the company's investment arm, Google Ventures, to quickly assess whether an idea was worthy of their funding. Today, we've used the Design Sprint framework to help companies at all stages of the product development process validate their work and build with confidence.

In this Google Design Sprint Workshop, you'll learn the skills to bring your ideas to life and put them in front of users in one workweek. We'll walk you through each step of the Product Design Sprint Process, from brainstorming, to prototyping, to testing on real users, to synthesizing the results, so you can bring a new level of proof to all of your projects.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Apply design thinking concepts to a business problem
  • Rapidly collaborate with a team to find solutions
  • Familiarity with the Google Design Sprint process
  • Ability to participate in or facilitate a Google Design Sprint
  • Techniques for turning business ideas into concrete problem statements
  • Techniques for facilitating various decision activities
  • Lightweight sketching and prototyping
  • Hands-on experience interviewing users
  • Learn to value and embrace “failing fast”

Speakers
avatar for Judith Sol-Dyess

Judith Sol-Dyess

Senior Project Strategist, Table XI
I'm a project strategist who, probably like you, wears many hats: project manager, product manager, scrum master and agile transformation coach for my clients. I really enjoy the work I do, and the people I get to meet along the way. I help teams work better together and deliver value... Read More →


Tuesday May 21, 2019 3:30pm - 5:00pm
E-4025 (4th Floor)

3:30pm

Surviving Legacy Code (continued) (J. B. Rainsberger)

Abstract:
Working with legacy code remains difficult. We feel afraid to change it, but sometimes we have no choice.
Learn key techniques to help you manage your risk. J. B. Rainsberger gives you a safe code base in which to experiment and he guides you through the confusing risk/reward decisions involved in living with legacy code. You will learn and practise several specific, safe techniques that you can start using on your own legacy code once you return to your project.
You should attend this workshop if you have code that seems impossible to change, code that you feel really uncomfortable changing, or you want to avoid creating code like that in the future. J. B.’s advice transcends business domains and programming languages. Moreover, you get to find out how he thinks through the tough choices as well as improve the design with (relative) grace and ease.
After learning a technique, it’s your turn to try it out for yourself. All you need is a working development environment for your favorite programming language and to install git. (Strictly speaking, you don’t even need to do that, but you probably should.) If you get stuck, then J. B. helps you get moving again. If something seems strange, then J. B. helps you make sense of it–or maybe he agrees that it’s strange and you should try something else.

Learning Outcomes:
  • See the central conflict in working with legacy code: I want to add tests to refactor safely, but I need to refactor to add tests at a reasonable cost.
  • Learn how to add tests quickly to existing code using the text-based output that the system already produces.
  • Learn 4 key design techniques that help address the central conflict of legacy code.
  • Learn the core principles of rescuing legacy code: optimize for safety, document everything, embrace imperfection, play the long game, you can't chase all the rabbits.
  • Learn how to maintain focus in the inherently distracting environment of rescuing legacy code.
  • Learn how to work more harmoniously with people in the inherently frustrating and anxiety-inducing atmosphere of legacy systems.
  • Have a few tricks to start using immediately when returning to work in addition to some longer-term plans for improvement.


Speakers
avatar for J. B. Rainsberger

J. B. Rainsberger

Trusted Adviser, jbrains.ca
J. B. Rainsberger helps software companies better satisfy their customers and the businesses they support. Over the years, he has learned to write valuable software, turned himself into a joy to work with, and built a life that he loves. He has traveled the world sharing what he’s... Read More →


Tuesday May 21, 2019 3:30pm - 5:00pm
E-2022 (2nd Floor)

3:30pm

Thing Three: The Power of Peer Coaching (William Kammersell, Lieschen Gargano)
Abstract
Peer coaching can make a huge difference in reaching your work and personal goals, but how do you get started and and make it stick? We’d love to share our informal peer coaching method that combines personal responsibility, agile, and goal setting in a way that is guaranteed to be successful. We call it “Thing Three.” In this interactive session, we will teach you the basic format we follow, along with the research to back up why it works. We will also demonstrate how it has helped even the busiest colleagues stay accountable consistently, over years, and continue to reach every goal they set. You’ll get to exercise these skills too and immediately see the value of peer coaching!

Learning Outcomes:
  • Thing Three is an informal process we’ve created and have been using for years to facilitate peer coaching for both work and life. Participants will learn how to leverages agile techniques, like commitment/objective setting, limiting WIP, cyclical planning & reviews, and constant collaboration for their personal goals and challenges. They will leave with the tools to succeed in today’s VUCA world by providing vision, understanding, clarity, and agility.


Speakers
avatar for William Kammersell

William Kammersell

Curriculum Product Manager, Scaled Agile
William Kammersell is a Product Manager for Scaled Agile who loves to help teams and individuals build the best products they can. He's worked with agile teams for over 10 years as a developer, scrum master, agile coach, and product manager.
avatar for Lieschen Gargano

Lieschen Gargano

Agile Coach, Scaled Agile Inc.
I am a scrum master and agile coach with a background in conflict resolution and change management. I am currently applying my skills coaching non-development teams on business agility practices. In my spare time I love exploring the mountains near my Boulder CO home with my fami... Read More →



Tuesday May 21, 2019 3:30pm - 5:00pm
E-2023 (2nd Floor)

3:30pm

Unlocking the potential of cybersecurity as a catalyst for agile transformations (Ryan Webster)
Abstract:
This interactive session will share lessons and experiences in balancing cybersecurity and product development from an ongoing digital product incubator program at BCG. Participants will engage in taking the role of the product owner and experience the challenges in balancing business and security priorities in an agile development environment. In addition, we will dive into our methodology and approach to operationalize cybersecurity across product, architecture, and development efforts in program. Join us for this exciting session as we explore cybersecurity from the product owner perspective.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Provide an introduction and to integrating cybersecurity into building digital products
  • Explore an agile-paced, risk based approach to secure development
  •  Experience rapid prioritization of non-functional and functional features in product development
  • Experience the challenges in balancing cybersecurity features with product feature delivery for a MVP release
  • Share our experiences and learn from each other


Speakers


Tuesday May 21, 2019 3:30pm - 5:00pm
E-2024 (2nd Floor)

5:15pm

Agile Montréal Presentation & Reception
XP2019 registered attendees are invited to join Agile Montréal  for a talk followed by a reception.

Tuesday May 21, 2019 5:15pm - 7:30pm
Auditorium /Auberge
 
Wednesday, May 22
 

8:00am

Networking Coffee
Wednesday May 22, 2019 8:00am - 9:00am
Salle Pas Perdus (Lobby)

8:00am

Registration Open
Wednesday May 22, 2019 8:00am - 6:15pm
Salle Pas Perdus (Lobby)

8:30am

Open Jam Huddle
Speakers
avatar for Ainsley Nies

Ainsley Nies

Principal, Acorn Consulting Enterprises
As an independent consultant, Ainsley’s work is focused on the development of sustainable environments for learning and continuous improvement. She enjoys using a variety of approaches, including chartering, retrospectives, Open Space Technology, and World Café, to enable clients... Read More →


Wednesday May 22, 2019 8:30am - 9:00am
XP Open Jam 2019.

9:00am

Conference Daily Welcome by General & Program Co-Chairs
Speakers
avatar for Francois Coallier

Francois Coallier

XP2019 General Chair, ETS
François Coallier is full professor at the Department of Software and IT Engineering at the École de technologie supérieure (ÉTS), one of Canada's leading engineering school, affiliated to the Université du Québec network. He was CIO of ÉTS between 2010 and 2016 and the founding... Read More →
avatar for Steven Fraser

Steven Fraser

Impresario & Principal Consultant, Innoxec (Innovation Executive Services)
Steven Fraser is based in Silicon Valley and has served as an innovation catalyst with global influence for HP, Cisco, Qualcomm, and Nortel. In addition to a year as a Visiting Scientist at Carnegie Mellon University’s Software Engineering Institute (SEI) consulting on domain engineering... Read More →
avatar for Philippe Kruchten

Philippe Kruchten

Professor, UBC
Philippe Kruchten is a professor of software engineering at the University of British Columbia, in Vancouver, Canada. His current research interests include software architecture and software evolution, in particular the phenomenon called “technical debt”, as well as software... Read More →


Wednesday May 22, 2019 9:00am - 9:15am
Auditorium /Auberge

9:00am

Open Jam
Open Jam is an informal, lightly structured discussion space that runs each day of the XP2019 Core Conference and the final Tutorial-Workshop-Symposium Day. It’s where XP2019 attendees gather to introduce their ideas while building off of one another's creativity. Open Jam is a place where you can just sit and relax, mull things over or just be. Emergent sessions often appear – “Lean Coffee” anyone?

“Open Jam” is not the same as “Open Space” which has run at previous XP Conferences, although it shares similar principles of self-organization. Sessions on any topic are scheduled for the day they are proposed. Conference speakers may often hold an Open Jam session for follow-up Q&A. Starting on Wednesday, May 22, each XP2019 Conference day will begin with an “Open Jam Huddle” at 8:30 am with proposals for that day’s Open Jam. Participants are invited to add their session to the schedule display board, and announce it. New sessions may be added throughout the day as long as there are time slots, available. Information on sessions proposed after the Huddle will be tweeted to #XPOJ2019.

Speakers
avatar for Ainsley Nies

Ainsley Nies

Principal, Acorn Consulting Enterprises
As an independent consultant, Ainsley’s work is focused on the development of sustainable environments for learning and continuous improvement. She enjoys using a variety of approaches, including chartering, retrospectives, Open Space Technology, and World Café, to enable clients... Read More →


Wednesday May 22, 2019 9:00am - 6:15pm
XP Open Jam 2019.

9:15am

KEYNOTE: #NoFrameworks: How We Can Take Agile Back! (Scott Ambler)
Abstract:
A fundamental philosophy from the early days of Agile, and particularly of XP, is that teams should own their process. Today we would say that they should be allowed, and better yet, enabled, to choose their own way of working (WoW).

This was a powerful vision, but it was quickly abandoned to make way for the Agile certification gold rush. Why do the hard work of learning your craft, of improving your WoW via experimentation and learning, when you can instead become a certified master of an agile method in two days or a program consultant of a scaling framework in four? It sounds great, and certainly is great for anyone collecting the money, but 18 years after the signing of the Agile Manifesto as an industry we’re nowhere near reaching Agile’s promise. Nowhere near it.

We had it right in the very beginning, and the lean community had it right all along – teams need to own their process, they must be enabled to choose their WoW. To do this we need to stop looking for easy answers, we must reject the simplistic solutions that the agile industrial complex wants to sell us, and most importantly recognize that we need #NoFrameworks.



Speakers
avatar for Scott Ambler

Scott Ambler

Senior Consulting Partner, Disciplined Agile, Inc.
Scott is a Senior Consulting Partner of Scott Ambler + Associates, working with organizations around the world to help them to improve their software processes. He provides training, coaching, and mentoring in disciplined agile and lean strategies at both the project and organizational... Read More →



Wednesday May 22, 2019 9:15am - 10:30am
Auditorium /Auberge

10:30am

Break
Wednesday May 22, 2019 10:30am - 11:00am
Salle Pas Perdus (Lobby)

11:00am

Agile Practices in Practice: Towards A Theory of Agile Adoption and Process Evolution
Abstract:
As teams and organisations make the difficult shift to agile ways of working, there has been relatively little investigation of how they adopt and use agile practices. To aid those teams looking to move to agile we should examine how others have done so and what practical value they found. We studied teams which adopted agile practices across a spectrum from taking on a whole methodology to a couple of practices at a time, and then committed to continuous assessment and improvement of their ways of working. Those teams favoured adapting agile-based, team-oriented practices suited to their particular needs over technical practices and defined methodologies.



Speakers
avatar for James Noble

James Noble

Professor, Victoria University of Wellington
programming, guitars, programming languages, analogue eurorack modulars, post-agile methods, digital synthesisers, grounded theory, plastic recorders, design, whatever. helvetica.
avatar for Craig Anslow

Craig Anslow

Lecturer in Software Engineering, Victoria University of Wellington
I study Agile teams, build tools for Agile teams, and educate people about software development processes notably Agile methods.



Wednesday May 22, 2019 11:00am - 11:30am
E-2022 (2nd Floor)

11:00am

Intentional Learning - Map a Successful Strategy (Claire Moss)
Abstract:
As agile team members, we are committed to learning. However, often our learning is opportunistic and unplanned: we chase the latest shiny thing and gain broad but shallow knowledge. In a workshop inspired by Dan North and Chris Matt's work in skills mapping, you will chart your own learning adventure based on where you are now and where you want to be in the future.

This workshop will have 5 parts:
  1.  Intro - Overview of current learning landscape. Outside of a degree or certification program, learning requires individual planning and a tiny bit of discipline. I'll present an outline of the technique we'll follow for this workshop and highlight results from applying this technique with 2 different teams.
  2. Skills Mapping and Self-Evaluation. Attendees will self-evaluate their skills in two realms - skills needed by their teams and skills they'd like for their own professional advancement (a little 2008 but essential to set the stage for the remaining 2 parts). The presenters will provide some sample skills list for different agile roles as a starting point.
  3. Learning / Mastery Objectives. Attendees will review some example skills maps, then analyze their skills map and choose which skills they would like to augment or acquire and what level of mastery they would like to achieve
  4. Map your strategy. There are many different ways to approach learning. However, being intentional about what you learn and how you approach it means you increase your odds of success. I'll briefly highlight the latest research in learning styles and today's popular methods. Attendees will identify concrete next steps to take on their individual learning adventure, with the table group contributing ideas and experience.
  5.  Wrap up

Learning Outcomes:
  • Identify skills desired for your personal professional benefit.
  • Identify skills that are important to your team's success.
  • Select target skills and determine desired mastery levels.
  • Select learning activities to begin progress towards desired mastery level.


Speakers
avatar for Claire Moss

Claire Moss

Developer, Agilist, Tester, ScrumMaster, Product Owner, Agile coach, aclairefication
Agilist working as part of product development teams to support and accelerate development through fast feedback. I help teams to craft more executable user stories. Product backlog creator and groomer with emphasis on progressive elaboration. Front-end Javascript development, back-end... Read More →



Wednesday May 22, 2019 11:00am - 12:30pm
E-2024 (2nd Floor)

11:00am

PANEL: Security and Privacy Best Practices for Software Development

Abstract:
In reaction to reports of recent high-profile software security and privacy failures in our always-on agile world, users and regulators are demanding that companies deliver more trustworthy and resilient systems. This panel will discuss some of the strategies and best practices for “building-in security” to our products and systems in contrast to “bolting-on security” – and how threats should be assessed and mitigated to avoid the unintended consequences of flawed design decisions.

Learning Outcomes:



Speakers
avatar for Steven Fraser

Steven Fraser

Impresario & Principal Consultant, Innoxec (Innovation Executive Services)
Steven Fraser is based in Silicon Valley and has served as an innovation catalyst with global influence for HP, Cisco, Qualcomm, and Nortel. In addition to a year as a Visiting Scientist at Carnegie Mellon University’s Software Engineering Institute (SEI) consulting on domain engineering... Read More →
avatar for Scott Ambler

Scott Ambler

Senior Consulting Partner, Disciplined Agile, Inc.
Scott is a Senior Consulting Partner of Scott Ambler + Associates, working with organizations around the world to help them to improve their software processes. He provides training, coaching, and mentoring in disciplined agile and lean strategies at both the project and organizational... Read More →
avatar for Robert Crawhall

Robert Crawhall

Principal Consultant, Innoxec
Based in Ottawa, Ontario, with over 30 years experience in many facets of the Canadian innovation ecosystem, Rob Crawhall works with leaders in industry, academia, government and not-for-profits to craft strategy and implement programs that will harness emerging and disruptive technologies for economic growth and improved quality of life... Read More →
avatar for Dennis Mancl

Dennis Mancl

MSWX Software Experts
Dennis worked in software development in telecom for many years - he is an advocate for agile methods, and he has been involved in coaching for requirements modeling, software architecture planning, and legacy software techniques.


Wednesday May 22, 2019 11:00am - 12:30pm
Auditorium /Auberge

11:00am

Growing Your Personal Design Heuristics (Rebecca Wirfs-Brock)
Abstract:
How can we get better as software designers? By becoming more aware of our design heuristics and continuing to cultivate and refine them. Heuristics aid in design, guide our use of other heuristics, and even determine our attitude and behavior. For example, as agile software developers we value frequent feedback and decomposing larger design problems into smaller, more manageable chunks that we design and test as we go. We each have our own set of heuristics that we have acquired through reading, practice, and experience.

This session introduces simple ways to record design heuristics and how to share them with others. You can grow as a designer by examining and reflecting on the decisions you make and their impacts, becoming more aware of seemingly minor decisions that were more important than you thought, and putting your own spin on the advice of experts. While we may read others’ design advice—be it patterns or stack overflow replies, the heuristics we’ve personally discovered on our own design journey may be even more important.

Come to this hands-on session to try out practical techniques for distilling your design heuristics (so you can explore and explain them to others); learn ways to identify competing heuristics; evaluate shiny new heuristics you may read or hear about; and grow your ability to explain your heuristics to others.


Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand 3 different types of design heuristics: heuristics that aid in design, determine our attitude, and guide use of other heuristics
  • Learn simple techniques for recording heuristics on the fly (Question-Heuristic-Example Cards, Heuristic Gists)
  • Recognize competing heuristics and how to integrate new heuristics into your existing heuristic toolkit


Speakers
avatar for Rebecca Wirfs-Brock

Rebecca Wirfs-Brock

Wirfs-Brock Associates
I'm best known as the "design geek" who invented Responsibility-Driven Design and the xDriven meme (think TDD, BDD, DDD..). I'm keen about team effectiveness, communicating complex requirements, software quality, agile QA, pragmatic TDD, and patterns and practices for architecting... Read More →


Wednesday May 22, 2019 11:00am - 12:30pm
E-4024 (4th Floor)

11:00am

Listen, sketch and remember! (Nienke Alma)
Abstract:
It’s a wrap! You feel inspired by that great conference you have attended. Tomorrow things are going to be different. You go home with new ideas and full commitment to try out that cool practice the keynote speaker told you about. But when you’re back in your office the day to day business requires your full attention again and soon most conference learnings become hard to remember.

If this sounds familiar to you, this workshop might be interesting. Have you ever tried sketchnoting? Or do you think that only works for real artists? That’s exactly what Nienke Alma thought when she joined a sketchnoting workshop during an open space session three years ago. “This could be fun, but probably I will never be good enough to put this into practice”. She was wrong: soon enough she found out the amazing effect on her conference experience and memory by just changing the way she took notes.
You don’t have to become a visual artist. Sketchnoting isn’t about perfection. It is just a way to activate new parts of your brain that enhances your listening. In this workshop Nienke Alma wants to inspire you by sharing her own sketchnoting experiences and providing tips & tricks. Moreover, she encourages you to try it out. Be prepared to do some actual sketchnoting during the workshop!

Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn how to make sketchnoting valuable for yourself
  •  Experience the difference between sketchnoting and taking regular written notes, especially with respect to the way you remember what you have heard
  • Find out how sketchnoting could be applied in your daily job


Speakers
avatar for Nienke Alma

Nienke Alma

Agile Coach, ING
Nienke Alma is a people oriented Agile enthusiast with 12 years of experience as Agile coach, trainer, Scrum Master, tester and test manager. She currently works as an Agile Coach at ING in the Netherlands.She has special interest in team dynamics. Getting the best out of individuals... Read More →



Wednesday May 22, 2019 11:00am - 12:30pm
E-4025 (4th Floor)

11:00am

When Experts Collide- Exploring the Nuance of Team Integration with Popular Drum Beats (john ryskowski)
Abstract:
When forming a team we look for individuals that possess specific skill sets. To be effective, teams must integrate those skill sets and therein lays the challenge.
Empathy is an important tool in an agile coach’s tool box and the quickest route to empathy is first-hand experience. Wouldn’t it be nice to acquire first-hand experience of the nuances of team skills integration and process the whole event in the duration of a single workshop? Oh, and experience it kinesthetically? Dude!

Playing each part of a drum set is much easier than playing all the parts at the same time and in this session we leverage from that experience. Teams of performers will actually play their part of a drum beat then integrate with other performers playing their parts at the same time. These teams will experience a progression through individual mastery, peer team mastery, integrated team mastery (this is where it gets interesting), integrated team agility, and integrated team stability.

Learning Outcomes:
  • There are two important elements in an agile coach’s toolbox. The first is personal awareness in order to mindfully engage another human or group of humans without emotional attachment. Mastery of this element is a multi-faceted and an ongoing journey. The second element is to bring first-hand experiences to their work, especially if the nuances of that experience have been meaningfully studied and processed.
  • The experiences during this session will be discussed at each phase and more richly processed with the help of assigned observers.
Session Takeaways:
  • Team skills integration is physically contextual, but challenged with emotions
  • Apply a construct that defines steps from individual mastery to integrated team mastery
  • Become highly sensitized to the nuances of team skills integration


Speakers
avatar for john ryskowski

john ryskowski

President, JFR Consulting
Q: What makes all the hardware and software in an Apple store come to life? A: Relevant conversations The problem always boils down to the people, but within those people lies the solution. The solution cannot start without a conversation with the right people in the same room... Read More →



Wednesday May 22, 2019 11:00am - 12:30pm
E-2025 (2nd Floor)

11:30am

Agile Methods Knowledge Representation for Systematic Practices Adoption
Abstract:

As agile methods' popularity continues to grow, massive information and feedback on how these frameworks have been adopted can be found both in academia and industrial knowledge bases. Based on such collective experience, many approaches have been proposed aiming at simplifying the agile adoption process and maximizing its chances of success. These approaches guide practitioners by providing steps to follow to find out which practice suits their team best. Nonetheless, these approaches are not systematic and practitioners need to go through a long process. For instance, they need to identify the important situational factors that can have a positive/negative effect on the agile practice adoption. Available experiences thus require lots of effort to be discovered. This research proposes an agile methods knowledge representation using an ontology to make reusable and systematic that knowledge and experience on agile adoption reported in literature. Based on this model, added knowledge and inference rules, practitioners will systematically be able to get the answer with respect to agile practice selection and adoption, i.e, for a given goal, practitioners can retrieve which practices to achieve; from a situation, teams can tell what can be harmful and what can be useful for adopting a practice or what problems they may encounter; etc.




Speakers
avatar for Soreangsey Kiv

Soreangsey Kiv

Research and Teaching Assistant, Université catholique de Louvain



Wednesday May 22, 2019 11:30am - 12:00pm
E-2022 (2nd Floor)

12:30pm

Lunch
Wednesday May 22, 2019 12:30pm - 1:30pm
Salle Pas Perdus (Lobby)

1:30pm

Joining the Mob at Clearlink (Torrey Powell)

Abstract:
Software engineers historically have largely worked alone and in a vacuum on key projects. This has caused problems with transparency, creates knowledge towers, increases technical debt, and stifles innovation. Mob Programming has given Clearlink solutions to all of those problems and created benefits that have been unforeseen during our first two years of adopting the practice. From our experiences, we outline some best practices that will be beneficial to all those who wish to also adopt this technique.

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • There isn't a right or wrong way to do Mob Programming
  • Mob Programming removes knowledge towers
  • Code quality dramatically increases with multiple set of eyes always monitoring coding standards and techniques
  • Significant decrease in technical debt and rework because work is getting completed correctly the first time
  • Increased innovation and creativity occurs when engineers constantly brainstorm better ways of doing things
  • An amazing team culture where everyone has respect for others no matter where they are in their career

Speakers
avatar for Torrey Powell

Torrey Powell

Sr. Director of Technology, Clearlink
Torrey has been leading software development teams for over 18 years with a focus on management, people, and process. Iterating and refining them to create highly efficient teams that deeply care about their craft and performance. Culminating in creating a culture of joy and career... Read More →



Wednesday May 22, 2019 1:30pm - 2:00pm
E-2023 (2nd Floor)

1:30pm

The Product Owner in Large-Scale Agile: An Empirical Study through the Lens of Relational Coordination Theory
Abstract:

In agile software development, a core responsibility of the Product Owner (PO) is to communicate business needs to the development team. In large-scale agile software development projects, many teams work towards an overall outcome, but they also need to manage interdependencies and coordinate efficiently. In such settings, POs need to coordinate knowledge about project status and goal attainment, both within and across the development teams. Previous research has shown that the PO assumes a wide set of roles. Still, our knowledge about how POs coordinate amongst themselves and with their teams in large-scale agile is limited. In this case study, we explore PO coordination in a large-scale development program through the theoretical lens of Relational Coordination Theory. Our findings suggest that 1) coordination varies depending on the context of each PO, 2) a focus on achieving high-quality communication changes coordination over time, and 3) unscheduled coordination is an enabler for high-quality communication.


Speakers
avatar for Marthe Berntzen

Marthe Berntzen

PhD Student, Department of Informatics, University of Oslo
I am a PhD student at the Department of Informatics at the University of Oslo, Norway. I study coordination in large-scale agile software development projects, with a particular interest in team autonomy and the role of middle managers in achieving coordination efficiency. I have... Read More →
avatar for Nils Brede Moe

Nils Brede Moe

Research Manager, SINTEF
I work with software process improvement, agile software develop- ment and global software development as a senior scientist at SINTEF Digital. My research interests are related to organizational, socio-technical, and global/distributed aspects. I wrote my thesis for the degree of... Read More →



Wednesday May 22, 2019 1:30pm - 2:00pm
E-2022 (2nd Floor)

1:30pm

Developing Agile skills through daily social games (Ludo Bruyere, Eric Boivin)
Abstract:
The end state of a highly performing Scrum team is described in the Scrum Guide by Ken Schwaber and Jeff Sutherland as follow: "when the values of commitment, courage, focus, openness and respect are embodied and lived by the Scrum Team, the Scrum pillars of transparency, inspection, and adaptation come to life and build trust for everyone". Then the authors add: "the Scrum Team members learn and explore those values as they work with the Scrum events, roles and artifacts." We simply believe we can fast-track the development of these Agile core values through daily social games. For the past three years, we have been experimenting with half a dozen of Scrum teams, offering opportunities to play a large variety of games (board games, card games, babyfoot, etc...) during the lunch hour and after hours. The results of this experimentation have quickly exceeded our expectations.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Why gaming is a very powerful tool to develop our Agile core values
  • What we learned from gaming at work
  • How to organize a successful gaming routine
  • Which games to play
  • Unsuspected benefits


Speakers
avatar for Eric Boivin

Eric Boivin

Lead Developer, teacher, game master
I am a lead developer since 2006 and teacher at university level since 2007. My main passions in life are boardgaming, public speaking and microbrewery beers!
avatar for Ludo Bruyere

Ludo Bruyere

Agile Coach, Bell Canada
Coaching employees through the organization Agile transformationScrum Mastering after managing projects for 20 yearsOn boarding new employees on the Agile journeyTeaching Agile training classesLearning beyond my Scrum Master certifications (PSM I/II and PMI-ACP)



Wednesday May 22, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm
E-4024 (4th Floor)

1:30pm

Inspect and adapt! Introducing Obeya as the next Agile practice (Nienke Alma)
Abstract:
An Agile transformation probably is never complete. Even when an Agile way of working is introduced company wide, there’s always more to wish for regarding your time to market, customer satisfaction or employee engagement. This certainly also applies to ING where a large scale Agile transformation was started in 2015. The Agile transformation already lead to many valuable results, but there is room for improvement. How do you keep the daily work of hundreds of squads aligned with the strategic goals of the organization? How can you help Agile leadership taking the right decisions, at the right time, based on the right information? It was necessary to explore what practices could be added to ING’s Agile Way of Working to help the organization to better deal with these challenges.

Inspired by a few local initiatives, ING chose to adopt Obeya as an add-on to the Agile Way of Working. An Obeya (“Big Room” in Japanese) is a place where top-down information about the strategic direction is connected with bottom up information about the actual results that we are achieving. This makes an Obeya a great enabler for effective Agile leadership. Based on the content presented in the room and a structure of rhythm and routine for meetings Agile leaders can apply validated learning in their day-to-day work.

The Agile Coaches initiated and supported the introduction of Obeyas in all Tribes of ING in the Netherlands and Belgium. Nienke Alma was one of them. In this presentation she will show the standardized approach the Agile Coaches used to set up the Obeyas from scratch and get them up and running. Based on her experience in multiple tribes, she’s able to compare the success of the introduction of Obeyas between these tribes. The significant differences in the success rate have provided valuable insights in the do’s and don’ts for the introduction of Obeya as a new Agile practice.

Do you want to know more about Obeya and how it fits in an Agile Way of Working? Are you looking for tips & tricks for how to set up an Obeya? Or learn how Obeya can help smoothen the flow of information about strategic direction and actual results in large organisations? Then this is a presentation you’d like to hear!

Learning Outcomes:
  •  Learn what an Obeya is and how it fits in an Agile way of working
  • Learn how Obeya can help smoothen the flow of information about strategic direction and actual results in large organisations
  •  Get tips and tricks for how to set up an Obeya from scratch
  •  Get inspired by ING's Obeya Coaching successes and failures


Speakers
avatar for Nienke Alma

Nienke Alma

Agile Coach, ING
Nienke Alma is a people oriented Agile enthusiast with 12 years of experience as Agile coach, trainer, Scrum Master, tester and test manager. She currently works as an Agile Coach at ING in the Netherlands.She has special interest in team dynamics. Getting the best out of individuals... Read More →



Wednesday May 22, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm
E-4025 (4th Floor)

1:30pm

It's a MAD world! Contract Testing can help! (Claire Moss)
Abstract:
APIs as products and microservices as a design pattern have become our day-to-day reality.
With more moving parts comes more complexity and a greater need for understanding. Developers and Product Managers need early warning signs that deployment is a bad idea.
Enter contract testing. (No, not the "contract negotiation" mentioned in the Agile Manifesto...)
Provider teams building API products collaborate with the consumer teams who are their customers to determine information needs. This negotiation works out in various ways that result in interface agreements between the teams.
Join Claire for an interactive exploration of contract testing as a feedback technique. Enable greater focus on the individuals and interactions. Make responding to the changes of this MAD world easier!

Learning Outcomes:
  • Relate familiar communication patterns to this new technology practice
  • Identify the problem that contract testing addresses
  •  Understand different kinds of contract testing
  •  Discuss different implementations of solutions
  •  See a demo in code
  • Be able to explain the value of the practice on the first day back at the office
  •  Deploy API products more easily!


Speakers
avatar for Claire Moss

Claire Moss

Developer, Agilist, Tester, ScrumMaster, Product Owner, Agile coach, aclairefication
Agilist working as part of product development teams to support and accelerate development through fast feedback. I help teams to craft more executable user stories. Product backlog creator and groomer with emphasis on progressive elaboration. Front-end Javascript development, back-end... Read More →



Wednesday May 22, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm
E-2024 (2nd Floor)

1:30pm

Agile Innovation: Company-University Collaborations (Part I) (Steven Fraser, Dennis Mancl)
Abstract:
Tech companies benefit from an open innovation model. Instead of relying solely on internal technical staff to innovate, companies frequently build a wider ecosystem by establishing collaborative relationships with university researchers. Collaboration programs are often a cost-effective way to catalyze innovation, attract new talent, and improve a company's reputation.

Universities benefit from an open innovation model by connecting with companies to attract additional funding, increase focus on real-world challenges, influence market/product direction, and incubate employment opportunities for their graduates.

This tutorial explores collaboration techniques, benefits, and potential challenges. We will present collaboration approaches used by companies and universities – and explore the benefits and failure modes of company/university engagement. Three areas to be discussed will include: choosing the right collaboration model, communicating to stakeholders on the progress of collaboration (outcomes), and managing intellectual property issues including those related to open source.

The tutorial will examine the perspective of both companies and universities through case studies - and conclude with a facilitated discussion to help participants develop collaboration road-maps and set expectations for partnership outcomes.

Program:
  • Introduction and overview - Agile strategies for developing effective collaborations
  • Company perspectives: strategies and desired outcomes
  • How to keep intellectual property issues from blocking company collaboration and “open innovation”
  • University perspectives: strategies and desired outcomes
  • How to keep intellectual property issues from blocking university collaboration and “open innovation”
  • Student perspectives on university-company collaborations



Learning Outcomes:
  • Increased awareness of the value of collaboration in the context of universities, companies, governments, and students
  • Evaluation of the differences in company and university perspectives on research constraints on funding and decision-making from university/company perspectives
  • Increased understanding of mechanisms to foster and support company/university collaborations
  • Discussion and understanding of next steps, ability to develop road-maps to increase the value of company/university collaborations

Speakers
avatar for Steven Fraser

Steven Fraser

Impresario & Principal Consultant, Innoxec (Innovation Executive Services)
Steven Fraser is based in Silicon Valley and has served as an innovation catalyst with global influence for HP, Cisco, Qualcomm, and Nortel. In addition to a year as a Visiting Scientist at Carnegie Mellon University’s Software Engineering Institute (SEI) consulting on domain engineering... Read More →
avatar for Dennis Mancl

Dennis Mancl

MSWX Software Experts
Dennis worked in software development in telecom for many years - he is an advocate for agile methods, and he has been involved in coaching for requirements modeling, software architecture planning, and legacy software techniques.


Wednesday May 22, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm
E-2025 (2nd Floor)

2:00pm

Is team self-selection the obvious choice? (Niels Harre, Martin Lohmann)
Abstract:
SimCorp has been a SAFe shop for 3 years, with 550 people in 55 teams and 7 ARTs, across 4 locations. In our pursuit for continuous improvements, we've been experimenting with team self-selection in parts of the organization. This experience report will present some of our learnings from these experiments, both what worked for us and what turned out not to work so well.
This experience report will include our recommendations, which include prerequisites for team self-selection and a suggested game plan for how to run team self-selection workshops and pitfalls to avoid

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
Before team self-selection:
  • Team self-selection requires preparation and the people involved in the process should engage and co-create the process the product backlog needs to be well prepared (as always) and known to the people assuming so people will know what tasks the teams should be able to perform.
  • Information on the process needs to be communicated early.
  • Co-create guiding principles of team composition (distributed, skills,...)
  •  Appoint someone to act on your behalf if you're not in attendance
  • Generate a competence and preference sheet to be used and shared.
  • If a person has reasons not to be in team with another person then he should let that person know before the event.
During the team self-selection:
  • Use an iterative team self-selection approach and evaluate the teams capabilities to . Continue until the result converge.
  • Never conclude a result the same day you have the workshop - give attendants the option to "sleep on the result".
  •  Do not use names or numbers to identify intermediate team constellations that can lead to any cognitive bias (could be influenced by cultural context, like team "1, 2, 3,.."; "blue, red,…").
  • Be aware of bullying and take a time-out immediately if it happens and address the case.
After team self-selection:
  • People do take ownership of the outcome.
  • Increase trust in teams.
  •  Feedback culture can grow.
  •  We have not measured, but assume value generation have increased.
  • Team self-selection also has the benefit of eliminating corporate politics and power struggles related to who should decide on team compositions. The process is 100% transparent and the only thing managers need to agree on is the guiding principles which should provide a clear and objective picture of what the teams are being optimized for.


Speakers
avatar for Niels Harre

Niels Harre

Director, Devemopment Manager, SimCorp A/S
I am a passionate agile practitioner working in a SAFe shop as "Development Manager" with focus on people and strategy. I am super interested in topics about personal and organisational development with the purpose of getting business adaptabillity. I've taken part in and driving... Read More →
ML

Martin Lohmann

Scrum Master, simcorp


Wednesday May 22, 2019 2:00pm - 2:30pm
E-2023 (2nd Floor)

2:00pm

Using Social Network Analysis to Investigate the Collaboration Between Architects and Agile Teams: A Case Study of a Large-Scale Agile Development Program in a German Consumer Electronics Company

Abstract:
Over the past two decades, agile methods have transformed and brought unique changes to software development practice by strongly emphasizing team collaboration, customer involvement, and change tolerance. The success of agile methods for small, co-located teams has inspired organizations to increasingly use them on a larger scale to build complex software systems. The scaling of agile methods poses new challenges such as inter-team coordination, dependencies to other existing environments or distribution of work without a defined architecture. The latter is also the reason why large-scale agile development has been subject to criticism since it neglects detailed assistance on software architecting. Although there is a growing body of literature on large-scale agile development, literature documenting the collaboration between architects and agile teams in such development efforts is still scarce. As little research has been conducted on this issue, this paper aims to fill this gap by providing a case study of a German consumer electronics retailer's large-scale agile development program. Based on social network analysis, this study describes the collaboration between architects and agile teams in terms of architecture sharing.




Speakers
avatar for Ömer Uludag

Ömer Uludag

PhD Student, Technical University of Munich



Wednesday May 22, 2019 2:00pm - 2:30pm
E-2022 (2nd Floor)

2:30pm

Agile Hardware Development at Bird Technologies (Kevin Thompson)

Abstract:
Many Agile patterns familiar to software developers lead to failure and frustration when applied to hardware development. In this presentation, I describe an Agile transformation I led for Bird Technologies, a company that makes high-reliability radio-frequency communication equipment. Working with teams of mechanical, electrical, and firmware engineers highlighted key differences in how an effective Scrum process differs for hardware development compared to software development. I identify those differences and present effective patterns here.

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • The Scrum process framework worked well for hardware development, but some common Agile practices did not.
  • Vertical slices of product functionality are not feasible.
  • Product Owners do not write many Stories.
  • There are no QA people on the Team.
  • Swarming is impractical.
  • Story Points are not appropriate for Story sizing and Sprint planning.


Speakers
avatar for Kevin Thompson, Ph.D.

Kevin Thompson, Ph.D.

Chief Scientist, Cprime
Talk to me about bringing Agile to hardware development! I do this for our clients that develop hardware products, often in conjunction with software.



Wednesday May 22, 2019 2:30pm - 3:00pm
E-2023 (2nd Floor)

2:30pm

How are Agile Release Trains Formed in Practice? A Case Study in a Large Financial Corporation

Abstract:
Release train formation, as part of SAFe transformation proceeded by forming a SAFe pilot with teams that already had experience with agile practices. Success of pilot led to launching of new release trains. The forming of new trains was challenged with: politics, difficulties in identifying value streams and, not wanting a radical restructuring of the organisation. These challenges led to opting for an organic way of transformation. Next, management organized several workshops to identify stakeholders for the second train. This was followed by teams choosing their teams based on skills and interests. And the last two trains were formed using lego workshops. The most significant challenges of forming release trains were: struggles with projects and challenges due to dependencies.


Speakers
avatar for Abheeshta Putta

Abheeshta Putta

Doctoral Student, Aalto University
avatar for Casper Lassenius

Casper Lassenius

Associate Professor, Aalto University


Wednesday May 22, 2019 2:30pm - 3:00pm
E-2022 (2nd Floor)

3:00pm

Break
Wednesday May 22, 2019 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Salle Pas Perdus (Lobby)

3:30pm

The Trials and Tribulations of Finding the Right Agile Framework for DevOps (Sarah Ziegenfuss)

Abstract:
The Digital Media division of National Public Radio (NPR) recently went through a period of growth that required scaling up its small sysadmin team to an Agile DevOps team. Initially, it was very tough for the team to let go of their old, ad hoc way of working and adopt new methods they perceived as “too formal” and “adding unnecessary process,” especially while going through institutional change and team expansion. This experience report discusses how I overcame that resistance to change within the team, why we struggled with our initial choice of the Scrum framework, why we wanted to try Kanban, and how we settled on Scrum plus Kanban as the right fit for a DevOps team working within a primarily Scrum-based division.

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • Here are the key takeaways I’d like to cover in my report:
  • Too much change at once produced change fatigue and a resistance to new ideas or processes, so I want to share how we overcame that with baselines, clear goals, and phased approaches.
  • Another key lesson was the importance of making implicit processes (the ad hoc system of emails, slack pings, “hallway conversations”, and ops cave chats that made up work intake, division of tasks and follow up before Scrum) explicit to demonstrate that establishing an Agile framework actually wasn’t more complex than their current system.
  • I also want to stress the value of continuing to inspect and adapt through retrospectives and other channels, as that’s how we learned that Scrum alone wasn’t the best framework for a DevOps team, and how continued experimentation led us to Scrum plus Kanban.
  • And finally, I’d like to share a brief overview we set up Scrum plus Kanban to handle our specific DevOps challenges and how it might be adapted for other teams that handle both urgent, interrupt-based work and ongoing project work.


Speakers
avatar for Sarah Ziegenfuss

Sarah Ziegenfuss

Senior Scrum Master/Project Manager, National Public Radio (NPR)



Wednesday May 22, 2019 3:30pm - 4:00pm
E-2023 (2nd Floor)

3:30pm

Assignment based coaching – Increasing the impact of the Agile Coach (Nienke Alma)

Abstract:
How do you focus as an Agile Coach? And how do you make sure that your focus is aligned with business needs? These questions are on many Agile Coaches’ minds. It seems quite easy to spot a wide range of coaching opportunities. Only some opportunities are, however, recognized by the demanding side of Agile Coaching. It sometimes may be unclear what real problem Agile Coaching is helping to solve.

The impact of Agile Coaching will increase if continuous effort is being spent on aligning coaching activities with business needs. This raises new questions though: how do you actually know whether an Agile Coach is successful? Can you measure their impact? These questions are not only on the Agile Coaches’ minds, but are also increasingly important for anyone deciding on the use of Agile Coaching in organizations.
ING, a large bank in the Netherlands, started a large scale Agile transformation in 2015. Today ING has one of the largest communities of Agile Coaches in the world. Over 140 Agile Coaches support the organization in their transformation journey on a daily basis. Nienke Alma is one of them. In this presentation she will explain what ING has done to increase the impact of these Agile Coaches and to improve the transparency of the impact: the introduction of the Agile Coach assignment. Based on real examples she will give insight the writing process, the alignment with the coaching client and the fulfillment of the assignment.

Do you want to know more about how an Agile Coach assignment can help increasing the focus and the impact of the Agile Coach? What elements an Agile Coach assignment could contain, and how the coach environment influences the Agile Coach assignment? Or how the Agile Coach assignment can be used for a continuous conversation between the coach and the business? Then this is a session you don’t want to miss!

Learning Outcomes:
  •  How an Agile Coach assignment can help increasing the focus and the impact of the Agile Coach
  • What elements an Agile Coach assignment contains
  • How the coach environment influences the Agile Coach assignment
  • How the Agile Coach assignment can be used for a continuous conversation between the coach and the business


Speakers
avatar for Nienke Alma

Nienke Alma

Agile Coach, ING
Nienke Alma is a people oriented Agile enthusiast with 12 years of experience as Agile coach, trainer, Scrum Master, tester and test manager. She currently works as an Agile Coach at ING in the Netherlands.She has special interest in team dynamics. Getting the best out of individuals... Read More →



Wednesday May 22, 2019 3:30pm - 5:00pm
E-4025 (4th Floor)

3:30pm

Brain Snorting - an agile version of brainstorming with unique and powerful features (Dave Boyle)
Abstract:
If your innovation technique is to wait for a great idea then you have no technique. Brain Snorting is a collaboration game that can be played casually or formally depending on your mood. The formal version is played with a spreadsheet and a referee, the casual version is played with pen and paper or even nothing at all. All games are played with "snorters": small pig shaped toys that emit a snort when squeezed. All participants have their own snorter. By giving people a second voice, it allows them to contribute and make meaningful contributions despite social barriers like hegemony, embarrassment, bashfulness and intro/extroversion. It provides a mechanism to quiet down or even expel participants who seek to dominate the discourse. Rude tactics like interrupting people by repeating what has already been said or shaming do not have to be tolerated. The snorting devices provide instant and rapid feedback. It's also very funny and keeps people in a good mood.

The game directs people to imagine without constraints, cross pollinate ideas and generate epiphanies. This brings much more creativity and foresight to the table. Virtuoso mental techniques of inventing are defined, discussed and practiced. Respect and appreciation of others is highly encouraged. The best feature of all is the Freebie list. This is a mechanism where highly desirable features that initially appear to be too expensive to manifest, are partially gained by exposing infrastructure that is going to be built anyways. Gaining even a piece of a highly desirable feature for next to no work is a great benefit.

Learning Outcomes:
  • The attendee will take away a system of collaboration that seems light hearted and hilarious on the surface but is actually highly sophisticated and has many advantages over simply meeting and throwing around ideas.
  • Participants will learn about high level techniques of creativity like:
    synesthesia, complex inversion, the diagonal lemma, super discipline, the meta self, anthropomorphize and protagonize, reductio ad verum, pink light, and strong bottle. As well as understand how to train for these things.


Speakers
avatar for Dave Boyle

Dave Boyle

founder, Engineered Awareness
I have repaired business machines, carved sculptures, cooked food, designed science exhibits, designed and built props for film and tv, written software, built web sites, renovated homes, and taught techniques of creativity. I have been in hundreds of brain storm sessions for hundreds... Read More →



Wednesday May 22, 2019 3:30pm - 5:00pm
E-4024 (4th Floor)

3:30pm

Heart of Agile Teams at 10Pines (Federico Zuppa)

Abstract:
Heart of Agile Teams at 10Pines
What makes software development teams great? What are their values? Organizational leaders often struggle with creating the right environment for great software teams to thrive. As a result, the unlimited potential of teams is frequently wasted. While this problem is challenging, you can begin to turn your culture immediately. I will describe our recipe at 10Pines. The answer lies in a recipe of five ingredients which must be carefully measured and attended to:
  • People: at the heart, there’s the people. There cannot be great teams without motivated and capable developers.
  • Great environment: these people need an innovative environment where they can thrive, feel safe and be energized.
  • Vision: teams focus on what needs to be accomplished. Having a shared vision enables our teams to be aligned and collaborate better.
  • Self-organization: starting from this shared vision, we self-organize to devise a plan and work together towards it. Empowerment is the best, for both the products we create and ourselves, as it is the best intrinsic motivator.
  • Communication: last but not least, we need to communicate efficiently. Our Methodology maximizes the bandwidth working in an open-space, shortening feedback cycles and using all available digital tools.
In this presentation for managers you'll learn how one company created a workplace culture where people and teams flourish. Through a combination of storytelling and lecture, come discover how "The Heart of Agile Teams at 10Pines" can be a model for evoking the best in your teams, too.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Describe the key ingredientes great teams have
  • Describe what we, leaders in our organization, can do to create those teams.
  • Describe why people is at the heart of our recipe, the process we use to hire people and the Pine's path, our career plan.
  • Describe what we have done at 10Pines to create a collaborative, innovative environment where people feel safe and energized. Describe many of the practices we use to enforce these behaviors.
  • Describe how self-organization works in a self-managed company. Explain why is a key ingredient and how we self-organized teams. Describe the imporatance of leadership at 10Pines
  • Explain why having a shared vision is so important in this recipe and how we create one, for 10Pines and for each new project we start.
  • Explain the importance of communication and how we maximize the bandwidth of it.


Speakers
avatar for Federico Zuppa

Federico Zuppa

10Pines
I am partner at 10Pines, an Argentinean Software Company that does Agile Software Development. I love to talk about Agile: Methodologies, tools, techniques and anything that makes software development better. I recently wrote a book, in spanish, that you can find here: https://10pines.gitbook.io/desarrollo-de-software-agil-en-10pinesIn... Read More →



Wednesday May 22, 2019 3:30pm - 5:00pm
E-2022 (2nd Floor)

3:30pm

Agile Innovation: Company-University Collaborations (Part II) (Steven Fraser, Dennis Mancl)
Abstract:
Tech companies benefit from an open innovation model. Instead of relying solely on internal technical staff to innovate, companies frequently build a wider ecosystem by establishing collaborative relationships with university researchers. Collaboration programs are often a cost-effective way to catalyze innovation, attract new talent, and improve a company's reputation.

Universities benefit from an open innovation model by connecting with companies to attract additional funding, increase focus on real-world challenges, influence market/product direction, and incubate employment opportunities for their graduates.

This tutorial explores collaboration techniques, benefits, and potential challenges. We will present collaboration approaches used by companies and universities – and explore the benefits and failure modes of company/university engagement. Three areas to be discussed will include: choosing the right collaboration model, communicating to stakeholders on the progress of collaboration (outcomes), and managing intellectual property issues including those related to open source.

The tutorial will examine the perspective of both companies and universities through case studies - and conclude with a facilitated discussion to help participants develop collaboration road-maps and set expectations for partnership outcomes.

Program:
  • Introduction and overview - Agile strategies for developing effective collaborations
  • Company perspectives: strategies and desired outcomes
  • How to keep intellectual property issues from blocking company collaboration and “open innovation”
  • University perspectives: strategies and desired outcomes
  • How to keep intellectual property issues from blocking university collaboration and “open innovation”
  • Student perspectives on university-company collaborations


Learning Outcomes:
  • Increased awareness of the value of collaboration in the context of universities, companies, governments, and students
  • Evaluation of the differences in company and university perspectives on research constraints on funding and decision-making from university/company perspectives
  • Increased understanding of mechanisms to foster and support company/university collaborations
  • Discussion and understanding of next steps, ability to develop road-maps to increase the value of company/university collaborations

Speakers
avatar for Steven Fraser

Steven Fraser

Impresario & Principal Consultant, Innoxec (Innovation Executive Services)
Steven Fraser is based in Silicon Valley and has served as an innovation catalyst with global influence for HP, Cisco, Qualcomm, and Nortel. In addition to a year as a Visiting Scientist at Carnegie Mellon University’s Software Engineering Institute (SEI) consulting on domain engineering... Read More →
avatar for Dennis Mancl

Dennis Mancl

MSWX Software Experts
Dennis worked in software development in telecom for many years - he is an advocate for agile methods, and he has been involved in coaching for requirements modeling, software architecture planning, and legacy software techniques.


Wednesday May 22, 2019 3:30pm - 5:00pm
E-2025 (2nd Floor)

4:00pm

Experience Reports Round-Table
Are you curious about experience reports and how they come to be? – Join us for a discussion open to all led by Rebecca Wirfs-Brock and Steve Adolph (Experience Reports Track Chairs) on what makes for a good experience report and how writing and shepherding work provides value to the community. A special invitation is extended to all experience report writers and shepherds to attend and share their perspectives.

Speakers
avatar for Rebecca Wirfs-Brock

Rebecca Wirfs-Brock

Wirfs-Brock Associates
I'm best known as the "design geek" who invented Responsibility-Driven Design and the xDriven meme (think TDD, BDD, DDD..). I'm keen about team effectiveness, communicating complex requirements, software quality, agile QA, pragmatic TDD, and patterns and practices for architecting... Read More →
avatar for Steve Adolph

Steve Adolph

yet another agile coach, cprime
Serial Entrepreneur and Yet Another Agile Coach...I start a company, it fails, I go back to coaching. [repeat]. I've been designing systems (telephone switches, railway signalling) and managing systems development since the days of Fortran and 5 micron CMOS. Over the years I learned... Read More →


Wednesday May 22, 2019 4:00pm - 5:00pm
E-2023 (2nd Floor)

5:15pm

KEYNOTE: The Human Side of Agile (Robert Biddle)
Abstract:
Much of the agile manifesto emphasized the importance of the human aspects of software development. In practice, however, even as agile methods have become ubiquitous, human aspects are often overlooked. For example, studies show customer collaboration is often avoided, and interaction designers seldom work together with programmers. New approaches such as DevOps too easily ignore the possible to better connect the people involved. Of course, human behaviour is challenging: complex, subtle, and only imperfectly understood. However, applying what we do know can lead to important opportunities. This presentation will review experience in studying the human side of agile methods, examining areas of success and failure, and identifying principles to support improvement.



Speakers
avatar for Robert Biddle

Robert Biddle

Professor, Carleton University



Wednesday May 22, 2019 5:15pm - 6:15pm
Auditorium /Auberge

6:15pm

Opening Reception
Join us for XP 2019's Opening Night reception. The evening will be filled with food, drinks, and friends! Mix and mingle, chat with new attendees,  and reconnect with old friends.

Wednesday May 22, 2019 6:15pm - 9:00pm
Salle Pas Perdus (Lobby)
 
Thursday, May 23
 

8:00am

Networking Coffee
Thursday May 23, 2019 8:00am - 9:00am
Salle Pas Perdus (Lobby)

8:00am

Registration Open
Thursday May 23, 2019 8:00am - 5:15pm
Salle Pas Perdus (Lobby)

8:30am

Open Jam Huddle
Speakers
avatar for Ainsley Nies

Ainsley Nies

Principal, Acorn Consulting Enterprises
As an independent consultant, Ainsley’s work is focused on the development of sustainable environments for learning and continuous improvement. She enjoys using a variety of approaches, including chartering, retrospectives, Open Space Technology, and World Café, to enable clients... Read More →


Thursday May 23, 2019 8:30am - 9:00am
XP Open Jam 2019.

9:00am

Daily Welcome by General Chair and Program Co-Chairs
Speakers
avatar for Francois Coallier

Francois Coallier

XP2019 General Chair, ETS
François Coallier is full professor at the Department of Software and IT Engineering at the École de technologie supérieure (ÉTS), one of Canada's leading engineering school, affiliated to the Université du Québec network. He was CIO of ÉTS between 2010 and 2016 and the founding... Read More →
avatar for Steven Fraser

Steven Fraser

Impresario & Principal Consultant, Innoxec (Innovation Executive Services)
Steven Fraser is based in Silicon Valley and has served as an innovation catalyst with global influence for HP, Cisco, Qualcomm, and Nortel. In addition to a year as a Visiting Scientist at Carnegie Mellon University’s Software Engineering Institute (SEI) consulting on domain engineering... Read More →
avatar for Philippe Kruchten

Philippe Kruchten

Professor, UBC
Philippe Kruchten is a professor of software engineering at the University of British Columbia, in Vancouver, Canada. His current research interests include software architecture and software evolution, in particular the phenomenon called “technical debt”, as well as software... Read More →


Thursday May 23, 2019 9:00am - 9:15am
Auditorium /Auberge

9:00am

Open Jam
Open Jam is an informal, lightly structured discussion space that runs each day of the XP2019 Core Conference and the final Tutorial-Workshop-Symposium Day. It’s where XP2019 attendees gather to introduce their ideas while building off of one another's creativity. Open Jam is a place where you can just sit and relax, mull things over or just be. Emergent sessions often appear – “Lean Coffee” anyone?

“Open Jam” is not the same as “Open Space” which has run at previous XP Conferences, although it shares similar principles of self-organization. Sessions on any topic are scheduled for the day they are proposed. Conference speakers may often hold an Open Jam session for follow-up Q&A. Starting on Wednesday, May 22, each XP2019 Conference day will begin with an “Open Jam Huddle” at 8:30 am with proposals for that day’s Open Jam. Participants are invited to add their session to the schedule display board, and announce it. New sessions may be added throughout the day as long as there are time slots, available. Information on sessions proposed after the Huddle will be tweeted to #XPOJ2019.

Speakers
avatar for Ainsley Nies

Ainsley Nies

Principal, Acorn Consulting Enterprises
As an independent consultant, Ainsley’s work is focused on the development of sustainable environments for learning and continuous improvement. She enjoys using a variety of approaches, including chartering, retrospectives, Open Space Technology, and World Café, to enable clients... Read More →


Thursday May 23, 2019 9:00am - 5:00pm
XP Open Jam 2019.

9:15am

KEYNOTE: Agile, Mushrooms and Tibet (Evelyn Tian)

Abstract:
You probably wonder how these three words can possibly be connected.
Hold on to that curiosity, as I will be sharing some learnings based on my past decade of coaching experience from the trenches, from large and small organizations, from legacy to innovative products, from telecom, banking, insurance, automotive, marketing and e-commerce industries, from North America, Asia Pacific to Europe.
Our discussion will cover topics around transformation strategy, agile leadership, technical practices, product architecture, distributed development and scaling, while the connections among Agile, Mushrooms and Tibet are revealed.


Speakers
avatar for Evelyn Tian

Evelyn Tian

Founder, Coach and Trainer, Evelyn Konsult AB
Canadian living in Sweden, a full-stack coach and trainer (from team level to C level) Main focuses on transformation strategy, product development improvement, and coaching capability development.



Thursday May 23, 2019 9:15am - 10:30am
Auditorium /Auberge

10:30am

Break
Thursday May 23, 2019 10:30am - 11:00am
Salle Pas Perdus (Lobby)

11:00am

Leadership Gap in Agile Teams: How Teams and Scrum Masters Mature
Abstract:

How immature teams can become agile is a question that puzzles practitioners and researchers alike. Scrum is one method that supports agile working. Empirical research on the Scrum Master role
remains scarce and reveals contradicting results. While the Scrum Master role is often centred on one person in rather immature teams, the role is expected to be shared among multiple members in mature teams.

Objective:
Therefore, we aim to understand how the Scrum Master role changes while the team matures.

Method:
We applied Grounded Theory and conducted qualitative interviews with 53 practitioners of 29 software and non-software project teams from Robert Bosch GmbH.

Results:
We discovered that Scrum Masters initially play nine leadership roles: Method Champion, Disciplinizer on Equal Terms, Coach, Change Agent, Helicopter, Moderator, Networker, Knowledge Enabler and Protector. They transfer some of those roles to the team while it matures. The Scrum Master provides a leadership gap, which allows team members to take on a leadership role.

Conclusion:
The Scrum Master role changes while the team matures. Trust and freedom to take over a leadership role in teams are essential enablers. Our results support practitioners in implementing agile teams
in established companies.




Speakers
avatar for Simone V. Spiegler

Simone V. Spiegler

PhD Student, University of Stuttgart & Robert Bosch Automotive Steering Gmbh
Agile Coach and researcher on the lateral leadership role of a Scrum Master in established companies. My background in Social Psychology, Organizational Studies and Software Technology help me to integrate divers perspectives on the Scrum Master role.So far, I have worked for 3 different... Read More →



Thursday May 23, 2019 11:00am - 11:30am
E-2022 (2nd Floor)

11:00am

Data Visualization for Problem Solving (Ankur Saini)

Abstract:
Your agile methodology deserves a metrics framework that is agile itself. A framework that gathers relevant data, processes it efficiently, communicates achievements and challenges clearly, and is self-improving. In a digital world there is often an overload of tools that have the potential to produce and provide massive amounts of data. Data visualization provides an effective way to to quickly analyze large amounts of information using pictorial or graphical formats. This session provides a guidance to establish a methodology, tailored to your own needs, for gathering, processing, aggregating, and presenting metrics that matter using visualizations available via commonly-used spreadsheet software.
Using examples from Software Development projects at U.S. General Services Administration (GSA), we will explore the various data gathering and visualization techniques we’re currently employing to uncover problems beyond what burndown charts, sprint reports, flow reports and velocity charts allow us to. Through implementation of simple dashboards, our Product Owners are able to prioritize the right issues, our teams are able to solve the right problems and our end users are able to timely realize the benefits of our efforts. Our mantra is simple - If you can see a problem, you can take measures to diagnose and fix the problem. And we’ll share how we’ve applied this mantra to improve the overall user approval ratings for a system by over 25% within 12 months.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Data-to-Information-to-Knowledge-to-Wisdom (DIKW) Framework
  • 7-Step Improvement Process
  • Application of Data Visualization Techniques


Speakers
avatar for Ankur Saini

Ankur Saini

Program Manager, U.S. General Services Administration
Ankur Saini is a solutions architect who partners with CXOs, Product Owners and Developers to deliver business value through successful technology initiatives. Certified as a PMP, CSM and ITIL Expert, he has over 15 years of experience leading multi-million dollar software development... Read More →



Thursday May 23, 2019 11:00am - 12:30pm
E-4025 (4th Floor)

11:00am

Getting your runs on the board (Ferzeen Anis)

Abstract:
I've often asked my mentors and peers - what are the first things you look for or do when you start coaching a team? The answer is usually "It depends". While I tend to agree, I have found my own special sauce of “where to start when I have no idea where to start”.
Having coached teams in a wide range of industries, undergoing anything from basic capability uplift to enterprise-wide agile transformations, I’ve found the exercises and experiments that I will present here, to be my most helpful go-toolkit to use with a team when I first join them as an Agile Coach. They have helped me make connections, get me some quick wins, and given me time and data to convince more challenging audiences of the necessity of ongoing coaching in order to see its longer-term impacts.

Learning Outcomes:
  • A list of exercises to run with teams when practitioners are new to coaching or being challenged about the benefits they bring to the team.


Speakers
avatar for Ferzeen Anis

Ferzeen Anis

Consultant | Agile Coach | Trainer
I'm a lifelong learner, passionate about learning and development, collaborative ways of working and effective communication. I coach teams to grow and foster an agile mindset, which helps them achieve workplace as well as customer satisfaction in complex environments - all while... Read More →



Thursday May 23, 2019 11:00am - 12:30pm
E-4024 (4th Floor)

11:00am

Left Shift Education for DevOps Jobs (Ruth Lennon, Mark Underwood)

Abstract:
The knowledge pipeline needs to be established to constantly generate content that captures not only the know-how of cross-domain aspects, but also know why. Know-why is important for the employees to get clarity and facilitate the creation of trust amongst employees to foster collaboration. In such environment organization experience a high degree of employee engagement that contributes to the higher productivity and innovation potential.

This workshop is designed for teams, managers and educators. The workshop gives participants an opportunity to explore the transformation their organization could apply through a DevOps approach. Culture change is one of the most important elements of DevOps. The culture of education whether on the job or in a more formalised setting must change too. By integrating knowledge management with development and operations we can adapt more easily to incrementally delivering software features through DevOps Pipeline.

Each section of the workshop will involve all coordinators but will be lead by one or another at any given time which will enable the participants to ask questions of each coordinator more freely.

Learning Outcomes:
Upon completion of this workshop the attendees will:
  •  Gain an understanding of the pertinent issues surrounding DevOps culture change and Education
  •  Gain exposure to best practices
  •  Interact with others regarding their issues in employing DevOps with particular focus on the challenges presented by the culture change
  •  Have applied of their own processes in order to identify process improvements for knowledge management


Speakers
avatar for Nithyanandam "Mathi" Mathiyazhagan

Nithyanandam "Mathi" Mathiyazhagan

Lead Program Manager, Strategic Initiatives, John Hancock (ManuLife)
⬥ Program Lead with extensive experience in Business, Technology, and Knowledge Management. ⬥ Developed strategic solutions for operationalizing organizational product and Agile/DevOps strategies into programs/projects for creating business value. ⬥ Skilled at developing and... Read More →
avatar for Ruth Lennon

Ruth Lennon

Letterkenny Institute of Technology



Thursday May 23, 2019 11:00am - 12:30pm
E-2023 (2nd Floor)

11:00am

Technical Practices for Sustainable Code (Quinn Gil)

Abstract:
Highly maintainable code is hard to produce.
Without maintainability we can not have sustainable code, it will rot and have to be re-written. As an industry we're often given principles to follow which sound FANTASTIC... but don't layout the "how" of reaching these ideals.
We'll go into detail of four technical practices that have the biggest impact towards improving maintainability of the code we write.
As agile developers, what we want to do is deliver value to the customer quickly and consistently. As an agile developer and team, coding technical practices are the only way to develop code to quickly and consistently deliver value to the customer for the life of the product.
These technical practices produce simple, understandable, testable code which results in extremely maintainable code that we'll be able to enjoy working on for a long time.

Learning Outcomes:
  • How complexity decreases maintainability. Simplicity is maintainability.
  • How not using Getters encapsulates behavior leading to simpler code.
  • How avoiding branching simplifies understanding what the method does.
  • How isolating 3rd party code improves testability and encapsulates behavior.
  • How removing null from our code simplifies and encapsulates behavior.
  • Learn about some technical practices to produce simpler code - simplicity is maintainability.


Speakers
avatar for Quinn Gil

Quinn Gil

Software Crafter
Quinn got hooked on programming in a computer introduction course. For over 20 years, he's never gone more than a couple months without programming something; even while getting a degree in physics. Quinn has always been looking for ways to improve the code he writes, and the code... Read More →



Thursday May 23, 2019 11:00am - 12:30pm
E-2024 (2nd Floor)

11:00am

The Art of Agile Conflict (William Kammersell, Lieschen Gargano)
Abstract:
Communication is the difference in valuing individuals over process. Communication is fluid and happens when a need arises. If we’re not ready to accept the conflict that often comes with it, we may fall back on process, ultimately leading to the dark side of the waterfall. Mastering the art of Agile conflict elevates our team’s innovation, delivery, satisfaction, and ultimately results.

In this interactive workshop, you’ll learn to:
  • Identify your personal conflict style
  • Understand the styles of others
  • Assess the root causes of conflict
  • Determine why persistent conflict reemerges
  • Be courageous and welcome the conflict that will strengthen you and your Agile teams

Learning Outcomes:
  • Identifying your personal conflict style
  • Understanding the styles of others
  • Assessing the root causes of conflict
  • Determining why persistent conflict reemerges
  • Being courageous and welcoming the conflict that will strengthen your Agile teams


Speakers
avatar for Lieschen Gargano

Lieschen Gargano

Agile Coach, Scaled Agile Inc.
I am a scrum master and agile coach with a background in conflict resolution and change management. I am currently applying my skills coaching non-development teams on business agility practices. In my spare time I love exploring the mountains near my Boulder CO home with my fami... Read More →
avatar for William Kammersell

William Kammersell

Curriculum Product Manager, Scaled Agile
William Kammersell is a Product Manager for Scaled Agile who loves to help teams and individuals build the best products they can. He's worked with agile teams for over 10 years as a developer, scrum master, agile coach, and product manager.



Thursday May 23, 2019 11:00am - 12:30pm
E-2025 (2nd Floor)

11:00am

PANEL: The Agile Manifesto: Impacts on Culture, Education, and Software Practices

Abstract:
Manifestos are often a vehicle to trigger change by catalyzing discussion around a core group of ideas and values – and there is no doubt that the publication of the “Agile Manifesto” in 2001 increased visibility for an emergent breed of lightweight software practices. This panel of academic and industry professionals will discuss the impact of the manifesto on culture, education, and software practices.


Speakers
avatar for Steven Fraser

Steven Fraser

Impresario & Principal Consultant, Innoxec (Innovation Executive Services)
Steven Fraser is based in Silicon Valley and has served as an innovation catalyst with global influence for HP, Cisco, Qualcomm, and Nortel. In addition to a year as a Visiting Scientist at Carnegie Mellon University’s Software Engineering Institute (SEI) consulting on domain engineering... Read More →
avatar for Robert Biddle

Robert Biddle

Professor, Carleton University
avatar for Evelyn Tian

Evelyn Tian

Founder, Coach and Trainer, Evelyn Konsult AB
Canadian living in Sweden, a full-stack coach and trainer (from team level to C level) Main focuses on transformation strategy, product development improvement, and coaching capability development.
avatar for Werner Wild

Werner Wild

CEO, EVOLUTION(R)
Agile & Lean in Practice
avatar for Rebecca Wirfs-Brock

Rebecca Wirfs-Brock

Wirfs-Brock Associates
I'm best known as the "design geek" who invented Responsibility-Driven Design and the xDriven meme (think TDD, BDD, DDD..). I'm keen about team effectiveness, communicating complex requirements, software quality, agile QA, pragmatic TDD, and patterns and practices for architecting... Read More →


Thursday May 23, 2019 11:00am - 12:30pm
Auditorium /Auberge

11:30am

BAM - Backlog Assessment Method
Abstract:
The necessity of software as stand-alone products, and as central parts of non-traditional software products have changed how software products are developed. It started with the introduction of the agile manifesto and has resulted in a change of how software process improvements (SPI) are conducted. Although there are agile SPI methods and several agile practices for evaluating and improving current processes and ways-of-working, no method or practices for evaluating the backlog exists. To address this gap, the Backlog Assessment Method (BAM) was developed and applied in collaboration with Telenor Sweden. BAM enables agile organizations to assess backlogs, and assure that the backlog items are good-enough for their needs and well aligned with the decision process. The results from the validation show that BAM is feasible and relevant in an industrial environment, and it indicates that BAM is useful as a tool to perform analysis of items in a specific backlog.


Speakers
avatar for Richard Berntsson Svensson

Richard Berntsson Svensson

Associate Professor, Chalmers | University of Gothenburg
I am Associate Professor (Docent) in Software Engineering at Chalmers | University of Gothenburg in Gothenburg, Sweden. My research interests in Software Engineering include data-driven decision making, agile and lean software development, value-based decision making/requirements... Read More →


Thursday May 23, 2019 11:30am - 12:00pm
E-2022 (2nd Floor)

12:00pm

The Unfulfilled Potential of Data Driven Decision Making in Agile Software Development
Abstract:
With the general trend towards data driven decision making (DDDM), organizations are looking for ways to use DDDM to improve their decisions. However, few studies have looked into the practitioners view of DDDM, in particular for agile organizations. In this paper we investigated the experiences of using DDDM, and how data can improve decision making. An emailed questionnaire was sent out to 124 industry practitioners in agile software developing companies, of which 84 answered. The results show that few practitioners indicated a wide-spread use of DDDM in their current decision making practices. The practitioners were more positive to its future use for higher-level and more general decision making, fairly positive to its use for requirements elicitation and prioritization decisions, while being less positive to its future use at the team level. The practitioners do see a lot of potential for DDDM in an agile context; however, currently unfulfilled.


Speakers
avatar for Richard Berntsson Svensson

Richard Berntsson Svensson

Associate Professor, Chalmers | University of Gothenburg
I am Associate Professor (Docent) in Software Engineering at Chalmers | University of Gothenburg in Gothenburg, Sweden. My research interests in Software Engineering include data-driven decision making, agile and lean software development, value-based decision making/requirements... Read More →


Thursday May 23, 2019 12:00pm - 12:30pm
E-2022 (2nd Floor)

12:30pm

Lunch
Thursday May 23, 2019 12:30pm - 1:30pm
Salle Pas Perdus (Lobby)

1:30pm

Herding the Stray Sheep: Lessons for Shepherds (Rosalia Adisti, Clementine Trifosa)

Abstract:
In an organization, a single introduction to an agile way of working is not enough to make teams consistently adopt agile practices. Without maintenance of agility, teams revert back to their initial non-agile ways of working. As internal agile coaches ("shepherd") in a large organization, we are required to "herd the stray sheep" by enabling teams ("sheep") to find their way back to agile practices. But, how do we do that? We followed the journey of a team who once "strayed" but later found their way back by leveraging the team's willingness to change, regular feedback from outside of the team, and an agile community of practice. With the newfound knowledge, we can implement ways to help teams re-adopt agile practices.

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • Change agents within the team: In this team, the change was advocated by three of the development team members. One of them knew how Scrum worked in his previous team, another was a very structured person, and the last one was vocal about things that need to be changed. They went the extra mile to find out better practices from outside the team, devised a new way of working, and implemented it. Once the team has strong drivers/agents of change who recognized the teams’ pain points that lead to poor performance, they can influence others to improve the situation.
  • Feedback and/or fresh perspective from outside the team: In this team, one of the pain points was story misestimation. No one from the team realized that this was caused by poor planning, that the story was not estimated by the development team. However, the functional manager spotted this out during a one-on-one meeting, in which he told some of the engineers to “find out the answer” at a guild meetup that discussed agile practices. Here, a regular one-on-one mechanism between team members and their functional managers (or someone from outside of the team) could give a fresh perspective and enabled the team to point in the right direction.
  • Support system from the organization: A community of practice (“guild”) played a key role in solving this team’s problem. When the team members needed to discuss agile practices deeply, they could always turn to this community by attending the meetups. Agile coaches could also become the support system by providing consultation sessions about agile practices.


Speakers
avatar for Rosalia Adisti

Rosalia Adisti

Agile Coach, Bukalapak
Hailing from Jakarta, Indonesia, Rosa is a newcomer in the Agile world. Between her daily activity in coaching teams into high performance, she is keen to discover how agile values, principles, and practices help teams solve their problems.
avatar for Clementine Trifosa

Clementine Trifosa

Agile Coach, Bukalapak



Thursday May 23, 2019 1:30pm - 2:00pm
E-2023 (2nd Floor)

1:30pm

Better Software Products in the Digital Age: Empowering Agile Project Members with Accessibility Testing Tools

Abstract:
There is a growing interest in making software more accessible for everyone, which is emphasized by the numerous suggestions passed into law in many countries. However, many software organizations that use agile methods postpone or neglect accessibility testing. We aimed to understand how ac-cessibility testing could be better integrated into the daily routine of agile projects by conducting a case study in a Norwegian bank. We investigated three accessibility testing tools by exposing agile project members to the tools and interviewing them afterward. Additionally, we observed them in 18 meetings and 18 workdays. All the methods we tested turned out to be suitable for agile projects. Especially the simulation glasses and automatic checker worked very well in finding accessibility issues and were well re-ceived and described as easy to use by the project members. All software organizations should empower their agile project members with low-cost, fast and efficient accessibility testing tools to make their products more ac-cessible for all. Doing this early and often in the development cycle could save the project for potential high costs at a later stage.


Speakers
avatar for Viktoria Stray

Viktoria Stray

Associate Professor, Department of Informatics, University of Oslo
Associate Professor in Software Engineering (University of Oslo), Research Scientist (SINTEF Digital). MSc in Computer Science (Norwegian University of Science and Technology and University of California, Santa Barbara), PhD (University of Oslo and University of New South Wales... Read More →



Thursday May 23, 2019 1:30pm - 2:00pm
E-2022 (2nd Floor)

1:30pm

Agile: Don't Just Do It, Be It! (Annika Bellin, Karin McEwan)

Abstract:
Stuck in an Agile rut? Do you feel that your organization has plateaued in its Agile journey? Wondering how you can deliver customer value even faster in the future? We believe that organizational and leadership changes can achieve just that. Come and discover as we share our in-the-trenches experiments and the resulting mechanisms and tools for empowering your teams.
Join your fellow conference participants in release planning and designing a model home for a customer. This session will take the concept of self-organizing teams to a different level. Such teams don’t just decide team assignments, but take many other decisions that help keep organizations moving forward at the speed and quality levels that the organization is built for. At the same time, all the teams are in alignment guided by a set of decision filters or guard-rails that keep on changing or expanding as the teams build their decision-making muscles. Explore how Agile teams engage effectively during different iterations of planning to deliver customer value – while keeping focus on learning and planning, not the plan. Find out how teams are able to make data-driven trade-offs to make hard decisions that are just-in-time and just-enough.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Tactics to move from scrum basics to "Being Agile"
  • A useful model for release planning, useful for dispersed teams
  • Data-driven models that enable teams to make objective decisions in real-time as they encounter changes


Speakers
avatar for Karin McEwan

Karin McEwan

Scrum Master, Veritas Technologies
avatar for Annika Arnholt

Annika Arnholt

Principal Program Manager, Veritas Technologies, LLC
Annika Arnholt is Principal Program Manager at Veritas Technologies, LLC, which is headquartered in Silicon Valley. Born and raised in Minnesota, United States, she works out of their Roseville, MN office. Annika is currently business-focused, supporting 18 business areas, including... Read More →



Thursday May 23, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm
E-2024 (2nd Floor)

1:30pm

CANCELLED: Crunching 'real-life stories' with DDD EventStorming and combining it with BDD techniques (Kenny Baas)

Abstract:
To really understand what our users will need, we want to have a first-hand experience from 'real-life stories' before we can model and create our software. While both the DDD and BDD techniques emphasis on ‘real-life stories’ by doing collaborative deliberate learning, they both focus on different goals. DDD focuses more on creating bounded contexts in which a single model is created, BDD focuses more on different scenarios and can create executable specifications as an outcome. By doing EventStorming and using techniques from BDD, such as Example Mapping or Feature Mapping, we can create more insights. We can simultaneously create a model and executable specifications for our user needs. This way, we can write software and tests which matches the shared understanding of the user, creating a ubiquitous language. Value will be shipped at a faster pace.
In this session, I will explain how to do Process EventStorming. We will use Example Mapping, or Feature Mapping to get more insights into our process. The outcome can drive our Software Modelling EventStorming and create Executable Specifications.

Learning Outcomes:
  • How you can combine different visual meeting styles to quickly iterate over models and requirements and see if they work.


Speakers
avatar for Kenny Baas-Schwegler

Kenny Baas-Schwegler

strategic software delivery consultant, XEBIA
Kenny Baas-Schwegler is a strategic software delivery consultant, Socio-technical architect, facilitator, collaborate modeller, technical lead that builds quality into software delivery at Xebia. He mentors, coaches and consults management and teams by using practices, techniques... Read More →


Thursday May 23, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm
E-4024 (4th Floor)

1:30pm

Enterprise big room planning at scale and what we learned in 18 iterations (Alexandre Paradis)
Abstract:
In their quest to scale from team agility to business agility, large organisations are experimenting with ways of achieving better alignment without falling back on traditional project management practices.

Westpac, a major financial institution in NZ, has not had project managers for over 4 years, and has relied on Program Increment Planning to set a planning cadence, improve face-to-face conversations throughout the business and build an overall more efficient organisation. Currently in its 18th iteration of quarterly Program Increment (PI) Planning, Westpac has acquired some valuable learnings along the way on how to execute and scale big room planning for delivery teams. The last event saw over 600 people from marketing, legal, IT, product and management swarming together in a single location to plan 12 weeks of discovery and delivery work.

This talk helps experienced agilists and managers foresee some of the tricks, tools, structure and missteps of PI planning. The evolution of four and a half years of quarterly iterations is valuable insight for other organisations with little or no experience in PI Planning. It is also a chance to understand the culture that drives PI Planning and enables Westpac NZ to achieve valuable outcomes from the process.
Westpac NZ is a major financial institution in New Zealand with a 400M NZ$/year portfolio and 5000 employees. It is part of Westpac Group which is head quartered in Australia.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Attendees will walk away with the knowledge of :
  • 1. Why PI Planning is right or not for your organisation
  • 2. What are Westpac's most important learnings from 18 iterations of PI Planning
  • 3. The tricks, tools and guidelines to setting up PI Planning
  • 4. The value of PI Planning at scale seen through pictures, artefacts and testimony


Speakers
avatar for Alexandre Paradis

Alexandre Paradis

Agile Coach, Westpac



Thursday May 23, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm
E-2025 (2nd Floor)

1:30pm

The Art of Crafting High Performing Teams (Ranjith Tharayil, Jeffson Dsouza)
Micro Abstract:  A single demo is worth a 100 meetings 

Abstract: 
Dojo Delivery Agility is an abstract (non prescriptive ) Agile product development framework built to augment the Dojo way of working across teams. Built on the concept of hyper sprints, Dojo Delivery Agility enables teams to build “E-shaped” skills to unlock the next level of productivity and predictability. Dojo Delivery Agility as a process framework is crafted on the fundamentals of SCRUM, XP, and Agile Dojo.
 
Agile Dojo is well known coaching strategy but  this talk is about our experiences with respect to our experiments with Dojo  as a product development framework across different domains.  Our experiences include mostly learning from failures and successes and hence the session would be driven by case studies. We will also be discussing our studies on teams that adopted Dojo as a way of working which showcased substantial improvement in predictability, productivity, and technical agility. We will also touch upon how Dojo acted as a constructive constrain to triggers change for good. Last but not the least we will also discuss our SENSI program which helped us scale our Dojo Delivery Agility capability of practitioners

Learning Outcomes:

  • Understand Dojo Delivery Agility as an agile software development frame work
  • Understanding context where Dojo Delivery Agility can be adopted and not
  • Participants would be able to relate to their work context and see if Dojo Delivery Agility could be a good fit and apply to their day to day work
  • See how they could re-use the dojo SENSI program on building capability in their organization
  • Dojo Delivery Agility is a result of 2 years of our experimentation and experiences, participants will be able to live through the learning, stand on it and take it to the next level


Attachments:


Speakers
avatar for Jeffson Dsouza

Jeffson Dsouza

Accenture
Associate Director at Accenture, Jeffson brings with him 19+ years of software industry experience to his role as Agile Community of Practice Lead at Accenture. He has expertise in adopting Agile and Lean in various organizations.
avatar for Ranjith Tharayil

Ranjith Tharayil

Shepherd , Agile Engineering practices, Accenture | SolutionsIQ
Ranjith Tharayil is an accomplished innovator, software craftsman and an inspirational servant leader, with over a decade's experience in the software industry. He is currently Head, Agile Engineering practices India, Accenture |SolutionsIQ and specializes in strategizing and planning... Read More →



Thursday May 23, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm
E-4025 (4th Floor)

2:00pm

How I made my role as an Agile Coach obsolete in 5 steps
Abstract:
Agile transformations are very difficult and time-consuming. Many organizations ask Agile coaches for help and guidance. During this transformation, the Agile coaches take the lead and put an Agile structure to support business agility. However, when the agile coaches leave, the organization tends to fall back on old habits.

In an interactive session, I will share my experience on how to cultivate an Agile transformation and make Agile coaches obsolete. This is based on real-life example, in which I was the Agile Coach.

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
Improvements & Lessons Learned
I have learned a lot about the organization, the Scrum Masters and about my self during this journey. I will elaborate on the most important ones below.
  •  Why it is important to stop having Agile Coaches doing all the work
  •  Why filling in every gap in the organization slows the transformation
  • how to help Scrum Masters realize they are to be the change agents
  • Find good professionals who can support you to stand on your own
  • What does it do to an Agile coach once being obsolete


Speakers
avatar for Ziryan Salayi

Ziryan Salayi

Agile Coach, Ziryan Consulting
Ziryan is an experiences Agilist with over 10 years of experience in Agile organizations. He holds an Agile Coaching certificate, PSM-I, and PSM-II and is a PST candidate for Scrum.org. Furthermore, Ziryan holds a Bachelor degree in Business Information Technology, Majoring in Cross-Cultural... Read More →



Thursday May 23, 2019 2:00pm - 2:30pm
E-2023 (2nd Floor)

2:00pm

Artifact-Facilitated Communication in Agile User-Centered Design
Abstract:
One of the main challenges faced while establishing the integration of Agile and User-Centered Design is how to facilitate communication among the invariably distinct involved practitioners. Advocating the use of artifacts as enablers in this scenario, this paper aims to explore and understand the artifacts which can facilitate the communication between developers and designers in an Agile User-Centered Design approach. Drawing upon a netnography of a globally-distributed online community of over 98 thousand members, we carried out community observation, data collection, and data analysis. The data analysis and interpretation pointed out two major themes: artifacts facilitate communication and artifacts support collaboration. Our paper provides an overview of the artifacts used for communication in Agile User-Centered Design and highlights how artifact-facilitated communication ensues in the industry through a perspective from practitioners.



Speakers
avatar for Tiago  Silva da Silva

Tiago Silva da Silva

Profesor, ICT-UNIFESP
Agile UX Researcher; Professor at UNIFESP; Visiting Professor/Researcher at UofC.



Thursday May 23, 2019 2:00pm - 2:30pm
E-2022 (2nd Floor)

2:30pm

Bias From The Bottom: Helping An Enterprise Team of Teams Bootup Their First Agile Release Train
Abstract:
Many agile transformations start life at the top with executive leadership buy-in and then creation of training timelines to move changes down and across the org. In this case study, we'll share a different approach taken by two coaches who, with initial blessing from leadership, decided to work with five line level teams just where they were, and to help them chart their own path towards scaling agile. Over the course of one full work week, instead of running through a prescribed set of training decks, the coaches offered up a buffet of agile and scaled agile resources for the teams to sample and discuss. This approach required just-in-time coach collaboration and improvisation, with nightly pivots and adjustments to the focus for the following day. The only plans fixed upfront were a kickoff session with leadership, and a scheduled playback session for Friday afternoon where the teams would share their learnings with upper leadership and then make their case for the scaled agile approach they wanted for themselves.

Speakers
avatar for Steve Adolph

Steve Adolph

yet another agile coach, cprime
Serial Entrepreneur and Yet Another Agile Coach...I start a company, it fails, I go back to coaching. [repeat]. I've been designing systems (telephone switches, railway signalling) and managing systems development since the days of Fortran and 5 micron CMOS. Over the years I learned... Read More →
avatar for Curtis Michelson

Curtis Michelson

Founder and Principal, Minds Alert, LLC
Organizational Strategy and Design


Thursday May 23, 2019 2:30pm - 3:00pm
E-2023 (2nd Floor)

3:00pm

Break
Thursday May 23, 2019 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Salle Pas Perdus (Lobby)

3:30pm

Transforming Mindsets to Accelerate an Agile Transformation (Randolph Wilk, John Margetis)
Abstract:
Agile transformations are difficult. People must learn a lot of new things. They need to conform to new frameworks, new processes, new ceremonies, new artifacts and new approaches to their work. And while most of these make up the mechanics of Agile, implementing them may not make that big a difference in how a team delivers. To make a real difference, and to get to true Agility, we need to transform team members away from legacy cultural thinking to new Agile mindsets. We classified the most prevalent legacy mindsets to come up with a plan to change them. We made the decision to make the annual performance goals the new ‘Agile Mindset’ goals. We also came up with related goals for the people leaders such that we could reinforce the new mindsets from both bottom-up and top-down. Each of these goals tied directly into the corporate strategic themes, and is tied to merit increases. We believe by institutionalizing these behaviors in the annual goals, we aim to minimize the potential of introducing conflicting priorities between our new direction and legacy momentum of the past.

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • Cultural issues and legacy behaviors can be more ingrained, pervasive and detrimental to Agile transformations than imagined. Organizations transforming to Agile need to be prepared to consistently and effectively deal with transforming from legacy to Agile mindsets and behaviors. Using annual performance goals to reinforce Agile mindsets and behaviors can be a valuable tool to prevent backsliding.


Speakers
avatar for John Margetis

John Margetis

Agile Coach, CPrime
I have spent almost a quarter century in various professional roles, but one common denominator that has remained consistent over time has been a focus on looking for "another way" to do things. I am passionate about solving real world problems that translate to measurable results... Read More →
avatar for Randolph Wilk

Randolph Wilk

SVP, Chief IS Development Officer, MetaBank
I am an avid Agilist and am fascinated with making better software by making software better, always open to talk about and learn better ways of developing software by doing it and helping others do it.



Thursday May 23, 2019 3:30pm - 4:00pm
E-2023 (2nd Floor)

3:30pm

A Proposal: Agile University (Cihangir Ertaban)
Abstract:
This session is based on coaching and academic experience from Fableplus Gmbh in an enterprise context and on “Agile Software and Product Development” lecture experience at Özyegin University.

This session will outline:
  • How Agile courses should focus on the principles of self-learning, teamwork, and feedback
  • Why University schedules and courses should incorporate agile principles
  • Communications patterns for effective dialogue within the learning community
  • Feedback patterns that will lead to more effective learning experiences
  • Why students need to take increased responsibility for their learning experiences

Learning Outcomes:
  • How to increase the agility of learning experiences
  • Patterns for improved learning experiences
  • Best practices based on enterprise experience

Speakers
avatar for Cihangir Ertaban

Cihangir Ertaban

Agile Coach, Fable+ Gmbh
Cihangir is an Enterprise and Agile Coach with experience in Telco, digital transformation, mobile app development, ERP systems and banking. He has led Agile Transformation of a large Enterprise, coached IT, non-IT, insource, outsource and distributed teams. He facilitated, trained... Read More →


Thursday May 23, 2019 3:30pm - 5:00pm
E-2024 (2nd Floor)

3:30pm

Beyond the Bottleneck: A New Theory of Constraints (John Rauser)
Abstract:
The classic theory of constraints has been effective for improving the core operations of product delivery systems, but its application to software products is running out of steam - it contemplates a linear system that is fundamentally different from ours, and misses much of the complexity involved in coordinating knowledge work across a network of people, teams, tools and processes.

How do we share knowledge and understanding in a complex network of systems? What does it mean to restrict the creation of value in a transformed organization? How can we more effectively connect our systems so innovation can emerge? To answer questions like these we need to evolve our understanding of what constrains our systems.

We need a new theory of constraints, one that unlocks new approaches for improving flow in our complex environments. In this talk we will explore what constrains a software delivery organization, examine some emerging practices for managing those constraints, and see how we can apply these practices at scale in a large software engineering organization.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Analytic vs. synthetic approaches to managing uncertainty
  • Different kinds of uncertainty and how they constrain our systems
  • The misapplication of analytic practices to manage synthetic work
  • The role of artifacts, network effects and social structures
  • The emergence of "synthetic management" approaches
  • A proposal for a new focussing process to find and remove synthetic constraints

Speakers
avatar for John Rauser

John Rauser

Software Engineering Manager, Cisco
I work on cloud-delivered network security applications at Cisco. I am passionate about "New Ways of Working" and putting theory into practice. I love pulling together different disciplines to come up with new perspectives on how things work. I think a lot about how we can improve... Read More →



Thursday May 23, 2019 3:30pm - 5:00pm
E-4024 (4th Floor)

3:30pm

The Art of Agile Documentation (David Sabine)

Abstract:
A Sense-making workshop to simplify valuable documentation & reduce wasteful documentation.
Myth: "Agile teams don't document."
Truth: Agile teams produce excellent and valuable documentation.
Agile Engineering practices have revolutionized the ways in which documentation is treated and produced. In high-stakes environments with heavy compliance and audit requirements, a tendency toward exhaustive documentation is dangerously common. This workshop provides direct guidance and simple tools to help a document-heavy workplace think differently about documentation.
I have developed this workshop to help an organization reframe their understanding of documentation with respect to knowledge work in complex environments so that they may eliminate unnecessary artifacts and simplify/automate others.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Attendees will:
  • 1. Reframe their understanding of documentation with respect to knowledge work in complex environments. (Documents are not truth. They are snapshots of current understanding. If not treated carefully, they create fiction not transparency.)
  • 2. Reframe their understanding of 'implementation' — when does it occur in product development? (Hints: it isn't a phase or project milestone; it is every moment in which a decision is codified in *the product*.)
  • 3. Compare the purpose of artifacts/documents produce pre and post implementation. (Documents pre-implementation do not represent decisions; they represent, at best, incomplete information. Documents create at or after the point of implementation are obsolete the moment they are produced.)
  • 4. Appraise commonly-used documents with respect to customer-value -- in contrast to perceived business/process 'importance'. (Documents are often produced because someone demanded they be done; but many documents are not the artifacts that any customer is willing to pay for. How might we focus on documentation which has actual value?)
  • 5. Consider and describe ways each artifact may be eliminated or simplified. (Like eliminating a Business Requirements Document in favour of a flexible/dynamic Product Backlog, how might an Agile team simplify the design and production of necessary artifacts/documents.)


Speakers
avatar for David Sabine

David Sabine

Professional Scrum Trainer
David, as Professional Scrum Trainer with Scrum.org, works to improve the profession of software delivery. He helps organizations deliver products of the highest possible quality and value. His career highlights the intersection of business, technology, fine art, and education. With... Read More →



Thursday May 23, 2019 3:30pm - 5:00pm
E-4025 (4th Floor)

3:30pm

Being Agile with Architecture Decisions: A Short Workshop on Architecture Decision Records (Ken Power)

Abstract:
Some architecture decisions are more consequential and higher impact than others, and need to be preserved. The right level of architecture documentation supports agility. Architecture Decision Records (ADRs) are a useful, lightweight approach for this. This hands-on session shares experiences with ADRs, giving you a set of tools to be successful in your team.
Some of the decisions made by architects are more consequential and higher impact than others, and need to be preserved. This session:
  • Shares the motivation that led to trying Architecture Decision Records (ADRs) for preserving decisions
  • Shares experiences working with ADRs
  • Draws from experiences with multiple large-scale, global organisations and system architectures
  • Builds on established work with ADRs from other authors and practitioners
  • Presents a summary of experiences using ADRs with teams from around the world
  • Shows examples of ADRs from each product line
  • Shares examples of challenges encountered when adopting and using ADRs
  • Provides participants with hands-on practice of creating and reviewing ADRs

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand how Architecture Decision Records can support agility
  • Options for structuring and tailoring Architecture Decision Record templates, including some examples of how we have tailored ADRs with different teams
  • Understand the types of decisions for which ADRs are appropriate, and what decisions might be better suited to a different medium
  • Factors to consider for creating, storing, and reviewing ADRs
  • Fostering a culture of valuing ADRs
  • Factors to consider when working with distributed teams in multiple geographies
  • Pointers to other work in the area of ADRs


Speakers
avatar for Ken Power

Ken Power

Software Engineering Leader, https://kenpower.dev/
Ken Power has held multiple positions in large technology organizations. His current responsibilities include leading global, large-scale engineering organization transformations. He has been working with agile and lean methods since 1999. He holds patents in virtualization and network... Read More →


Thursday May 23, 2019 3:30pm - 5:00pm
E-2022 (2nd Floor)

3:30pm

Refactoring the Agile Testing Quadrants (Michael Bolton)

Abstract:
Agile development hit mainstream recognition a long time ago. Yet there is often uncertainty and turmoil around what "agile development" means, in theory and in practice, and the place of testing within it. The confusion affects agile projects and the people in them.
There have been some discussion points, such as Mike Cohn’s Agile Testing Pyramid and Marick, Crisipin and Gregory’s Agile Testing Quadrants, and many people have found them helpful. Yet James Bach and Michael Bolton, authors of Rapid Software Testing, still hear testers expressing a good deal of pain over the role of the tester and the structures of testing activity in Agile projects.
Is there really such a thing as “Agile Testing”, or does testing remain testing while "agile" is context? Building on what has gone before, Michael Bolton will offer a refactoring of testing in agile contexts, with a refactored set of Agile Testing Quadrants. He'll use the lens of Rapid Software Testing—an agile (but not necessarily Agile) approach to testing that focuses on the mindset, skill set, and role of the tester. Michael will show how Agile projects can—and should—be infused with testing that helps to identify, defend, and maximize the value of the product while reducing the costs of development.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Attendees will learn about a set of frames for looking at test activity throughout the project: Intention (design-focused activity by which we discover what the customer really wants); Discipline (shallow testing that can help us discover if what we just did is reasonably close to what we intend to do); Preparation (advocating to make the product reasonably testable, and organizing the project and systems to facilitate testing work); and Realization (deep testing that can help us discover subtle, rare, or emergent problems that threaten the value of the product).


Speakers
avatar for Michael Bolton

Michael Bolton

Consulting Software Tester, DevelopSense
Michael Bolton is a consulting software tester and testing teacher who helps people to solve testing problems that they didn’t realize they could solve. He is the co-author (with senior author James Bach) of Rapid Software Testing, a methodology and mindset for testing software... Read More →



Thursday May 23, 2019 3:30pm - 5:00pm
E-2025 (2nd Floor)

4:00pm

Lemonade and Poutine: The foundation of our agile organizational transformations! (Amir Pourteymour, Philippe Sauve)
Abstract:
Have you heard about When life gives you lemons, make some lemonade? Call it transformational challenges, difficulties, or even adversities; we encountered many types of lemons as part of our organizational transformation from when we were a small company to when we were part of one of the largest enterprises in the World! Trust me, each time, we sliced those tough lemons and made them the sweetest, and of course, the most memorable lemonade or rather, the most exciting professional journey of my life.

Interested to hear more?

As a person who went through at least a handful of mergers and acquisitions and organizational transformation in our company, I gained firsthand experience and insight into some of the difficulties that companies face as part of their transformation.
As part of this talk, I would like to humbly share our unpublished detailed experience representing our novel leadership stance with examples of our challenges, observations, and reflections. Our goal is to share, exchange and inspire you by inviting you to take on this exciting roller-coaster journey of enabling operational excellence and improving employee development, satisfaction and retention over the last seven years.

Growing Pains! Sorting our ducks in the row!

During this talk, you will learn about our foundation chapter. The most important chapter of our transformation, which started with empathy. As a small company, we got acquired by one of the biggest software companies in the World. I will share with you the transformation in our roles and responsibilities, as well as development processes and practices.
As part of this talk, I will share that when you believe in the Agile values, how that toolboxes can help you in any transformation.

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
We present our topic in a way that you will leave the sessions with the following inspirational takeaways:
  • What was the most critical learning of these seven years? How did we leverage our Agile mindset and toolbox to help us navigate, embrace and succeed in our transformational challenges?
  • How did we deliver value incrementally and experimentally throughout the organizational transformation?
  •  What was the role of diversity and inclusivity in our team? How did our DNA enable each person to bring a different and valuable perspective to the table? How did we embrace different working cultures and locations? How did we innovate?
  •  How did we stay focused and prevented endless philosophical discussions?
  •  How did we intentionally and carefully create and define our own culture in our team? How did we remain open, transparent with a high level of energy? What was the value and impact of such culture as part of this transformation? How did we embrace our differences and conflicts?
  •  What was the value of having a big picture throughout this journey?


Speakers
avatar for Amir Pourteymour

Amir Pourteymour

Head of Operations - SAP Commerce Cloud, SAP
avatar for Philippe Sauve

Philippe Sauve

Operations, Agile Coach/Trainer, SAP Labs Canada


Thursday May 23, 2019 4:00pm - 4:30pm
E-2023 (2nd Floor)

4:30pm

Kiwi IT Labs - Exploring new ways of working in New Zealand (Siva Kumar)
Abstract:
Organizing effectively to deliver great end user services in the digital age is often a challenge for well-established, complex organisations. It often requires a significant transformation in how people work and how teams collaborate. In New Zealand, the Department of Internal Affairs (DIA) and Assurity Consulting have partnered to set up the Service Innovation Lab (SIL) as an experiment, with the aim of seeing what value can be gained by creating an innovation environment with support from coaches to help teams work in new ways. The ultimate mission is to help raise the level of collaboration across agencies in delivering better services to New Zealanders.

We feel that innovation alongside an organisation is where some real transformation of mindsets and cultures can be brought about. That’s why we’re excited about SIL as an experiment. The findings should help us find truly sustainable ways to transform how we deliver and refine services for New Zealanders. We’re also very proud to share the findings of our SIL work in Wellington. We hold regular Open Lab events for people to come and see for themselves and feel one of the great outcomes from the work is the pooling of lessons from visitors to the Lab.

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
The SIL experiment was modeled on what we believe is the DNA of successful digital organisational cultures. This means that when teams come to the Lab:
  •  everyone commits to a set of design principles that shape how we work together (more on this in the next few weeks)
  •  work is done in the open and everyone is located in a collaborative space, set up for multi-disciplinary teams
  •  there are a range of coaches available to support teams to get better at delivery
  • governance groups meet here and get to connect directly with the delivery teams and their work
We hope that the Service Innovation Lab work we’re doing is one part of the solution. We believe it will certainly help move Integrated Service Delivery in government forward at pace here in New Zealand. We look forward to sharing more about this as we continue the experiment with the Ministry of Education of New Zealand.


Speakers
avatar for Siva Kumar

Siva Kumar

Agile Coach
Leading Agile transformation in both private and public sectors in NZ, coaching Agile teams and teaching ICAgile-accredited certification courses.


Thursday May 23, 2019 4:30pm - 5:00pm
E-2023 (2nd Floor)

6:00pm

XP2019 Conference Party and Networking Special Event
Join us for a convivial evening at this historic institution in Vieux- Montréal, a mecca of Quebec gastronomy – and the first “auberge” in North America to receive a liquor license (March 4, 1754)!

Meet us in Pas Perdus (Open Jam- space) starting at 5:15 pm to walk over in groups.

Auberge Le Saint-Gabriel
426 St Gabriel St, Montreal

Thursday May 23, 2019 6:00pm - 10:00pm
Auditorium /Auberge
 
Friday, May 24
 

8:00am

Networking Coffee
Friday May 24, 2019 8:00am - 9:00am
Salle Pas Perdus (Lobby)

8:00am

Registration Open
Friday May 24, 2019 8:00am - 5:00pm
Salle Pas Perdus (Lobby)

8:30am

Open Jam Huddle
Speakers
avatar for Ainsley Nies

Ainsley Nies

Principal, Acorn Consulting Enterprises
As an independent consultant, Ainsley’s work is focused on the development of sustainable environments for learning and continuous improvement. She enjoys using a variety of approaches, including chartering, retrospectives, Open Space Technology, and World Café, to enable clients... Read More →


Friday May 24, 2019 8:30am - 9:00am
XP Open Jam 2019.

9:00am

Daily Welcome by General Chair and Program Co-Chairs
Speakers
avatar for Francois Coallier

Francois Coallier

XP2019 General Chair, ETS
François Coallier is full professor at the Department of Software and IT Engineering at the École de technologie supérieure (ÉTS), one of Canada's leading engineering school, affiliated to the Université du Québec network. He was CIO of ÉTS between 2010 and 2016 and the founding... Read More →
avatar for Steven Fraser

Steven Fraser

Impresario & Principal Consultant, Innoxec (Innovation Executive Services)
Steven Fraser is based in Silicon Valley and has served as an innovation catalyst with global influence for HP, Cisco, Qualcomm, and Nortel. In addition to a year as a Visiting Scientist at Carnegie Mellon University’s Software Engineering Institute (SEI) consulting on domain engineering... Read More →
avatar for Philippe Kruchten

Philippe Kruchten

Professor, UBC
Philippe Kruchten is a professor of software engineering at the University of British Columbia, in Vancouver, Canada. His current research interests include software architecture and software evolution, in particular the phenomenon called “technical debt”, as well as software... Read More →


Friday May 24, 2019 9:00am - 9:15am
Auditorium /Auberge

9:00am

Doctoral Symposium - Session I
The XP2019 Doctoral Symposium is intended to help PhD students at the beginning of their research career in software development. Experienced researchers will review research plans from the student participants and provide detailed feedback and guidance. Participation in the symposium is  solicited at three levels: doctoral students, advisors, and observers.

  • Welcome by Doctoral Symposium Chairs
  • Opening Keynote: Maria Paasivaara (IT University of Copenhagen)

Participation is by invitation. Please contact the Symposium organizers Casper Lassenius (casper.lassenius@aalto.fi)  for more information. This year marks the first year that the XP Doctoral Symposium will be co-located with the ICGSE (International Conference on Global Software Engineering) Doctoral Symposium.



Friday May 24, 2019 9:00am - 10:30am
x A-4458 (4th floor)

9:00am

Open Jam
Open Jam is an informal, lightly structured discussion space that runs each day of the XP2019 Core Conference and the final Tutorial-Workshop-Symposium Day. It’s where XP2019 attendees gather to introduce their ideas while building off of one another's creativity. Open Jam is a place where you can just sit and relax, mull things over or just be. Emergent sessions often appear – “Lean Coffee” anyone?

“Open Jam” is not the same as “Open Space” which has run at previous XP Conferences, although it shares similar principles of self-organization. Sessions on any topic are scheduled for the day they are proposed. Conference speakers may often hold an Open Jam session for follow-up Q&A. Starting on Wednesday, May 22, each XP2019 Conference day will begin with an “Open Jam Huddle” at 8:30 am with proposals for that day’s Open Jam. Participants are invited to add their session to the schedule display board, and announce it. New sessions may be added throughout the day as long as there are time slots, available. Information on sessions proposed after the Huddle will be tweeted to #XPOJ2019.

Speakers
avatar for Ainsley Nies

Ainsley Nies

Principal, Acorn Consulting Enterprises
As an independent consultant, Ainsley’s work is focused on the development of sustainable environments for learning and continuous improvement. She enjoys using a variety of approaches, including chartering, retrospectives, Open Space Technology, and World Café, to enable clients... Read More →


Friday May 24, 2019 9:00am - 5:00pm
XP Open Jam 2019.

9:15am

KEYNOTE: Programming in the Extreme: Finding a New Largest Known Prime (Landon Noll)
Abstract:
More than just a mathematical curiosity, the quest to discover a new largest known prime requires the development of advanced computational techniques and the development of fault resilient software. These computational techniques benefit a wide variety of applications from seismic analysis to large scale fluid dynamics. The fault resilient methodologies benefit a wide range of application such as cryptography and deep space probe design.

The search for a new largest known prime has been ongoing for centuries. In 1952, primality testing entered the realm of digital computers. Computers have been used construct proofs of primality for these enormous primes. We have come a long way since the 1970s when the speaker, Landon Noll, as a high school student discovered a 6533-digit prime. Today’s largest known prime is almost 25 million digits long! Those seeking to break the record for the largest known prime have pushed the bounds of computing. The development of these extreme primality testing programs offers important lessons today for those who must write code which must work correctly, even in the face of hardware errors, from the very first implementation.

The search for the largest known prime requires writing and running code that must run to completion, without any errors, throughout the entire proof of primality! A significant quality effort is required to write 100% error-free code. The calculations required to test extremely large numbers for primality must be fault resilient. One must overcome compiler and assembler errors, errors introduced by the kernel, and hardware errors such as memory errors and CPU calculation errors. The world record goes neither to the fastest coder nor to the person with the fastest hardware but rather to the first result that is proven to be correct. The reason for such extreme programming is that the length of the calculations exceeds the mean time to error of the calculating system. The motivation for such extreme care lies in the fact that a slow and correct answer is infinitely preferable to a fast but incorrect answer.

Knowledge of advanced mathematics is NOT required for this talk.



Speakers

Friday May 24, 2019 9:15am - 10:30am
Auditorium /Auberge

10:30am

Break
Friday May 24, 2019 10:30am - 11:00am
Salle Pas Perdus (Lobby)

11:00am

A taxonomy of software engineering challenges for machine learning systems: An empirical investigation
Abstract:
Artificial intelligence enabled systems have been an inevitable part of every day life. However, efficient software engineering principles and processes need to be considered and extended when developing AI-enabled systems. The objective of this study is to identify and classify software engineering challenges that are faced by different companies when developing software-intensive systems that incorporate machine learning components. Using case study approach, we explore the development of machine learning systems from six different companies across various domains and identified main software engineering challenges. The challenges are mapped into a proposed taxonomy that depicts the evolution of use of ML/DL components in software-intensive system in industrial settings. Our study provides useful insights to software engineering community and research to guide discussion and future research of applied machine learning.


Speakers
LE

Lucy Ellen Lwakatare

Chalmers University of Technology


Friday May 24, 2019 11:00am - 11:30am
E-2022 (2nd Floor)

11:00am

Doctoral Symposium Session II
The XP2019 Doctoral Symposium is intended to help PhD students at the beginning of their research career in software development. Experienced researchers will review research plans from the student participants and provide detailed feedback and guidance. Participation in the symposium is  solicited at three levels: doctoral students, advisors, and observers.

  • 11:00-11:45 Paper I: Nazish Saleem: Empirical Analysis of Critical Success Factors for Project Management in Global Software Development (student discussant: Masood Maldar)
  • 11:45-12:30 Paper II: Masood Maldar, Jean-Marc Robert and Ahmed Seffah: Engaging End-Users as UX Designers, Questions to Paving Research Agenda (student discussant: Mahmood Alsaadi)

Participation is by invitation. Please contact the Symposium organizers Casper Lassenius (casper.lassenius@aalto.fi)  for more information. This year marks the first year that the XP Doctoral Symposium will be co-located with the ICGSE (International Conference on Global Software Engineering) Doctoral Symposium.



Friday May 24, 2019 11:00am - 12:30pm
x A-4458 (4th floor)

11:00am

CD&D and DevOps in our reality! (Jonas Wigander)

Abstract:
This talk shares the experiences and knowledge gained while implementing CD&D and DevOps at Ericsson’s Business Area Digital Services (8000 employees).
The last couple of years have seen a movement in the telecom industry towards new business models and technologies, triggered by the introduction of the 5G mobile networks.
E.g. we can clearly see a trend towards microservices-oriented system design, and subscription-based business models. Still, the networks remain a complex systems of systems.
This talk is to share our experiences in establishing Continuous Delivery and Deployment in our reality - the highly complex, rapidly changing, and sometimes quite conservative telecom business.
When talking CD&D, we must also address DevOps, or so we think. We will share how we look upon DevOps, the relationship between CD&D and DevOps, and especially in a business-to-business-to-consumer business landscape.
Outline of report:
  • The many reasons for us going CD&D and DevOps!
  • How do we see CD&D and DevOps relate to and complement each other in our business situation?
  • How we are approaching CD&D and DevOps in a business environment that is o multi-customer, multi-country, o multi-technology environment, o extremely competitive, o with everything (literally!) changing rapidly, all the time, o with a blend of customers being from very conservative and traditional to being very progressive, o and where everyone involved in the industry needs to become faster and more efficient?
  • How we realized that getting inspiration from other success-cases is one thing, doing it yourself is something else…
  • How does company culture influence how you can (or can’t) succeed with the implementation and deployment of CD&D and DevOps?
  • What have we succeeded to do, and what remain to be done… or can we actually phrase it this way in our business?

Learning Outcomes:
  • When you leave this presentation, we hope that we have given you some insights from our journey, that you can take with to your own company’s journey towards CD&D and DevOps. And perhaps you will feel that you’re not alone in feeling that CD&D and DevOps maybe isn’t just that simple in your business arena?
  • Shared experience from addressing Continuous Delivery and Deployment, and DevOps
  • - at very large scale,
  • - in a business-to-business-to-customer industry,
  • - in a somewhat conservative, and highly regulated business,
  • - for large systems of systems.


Speakers
avatar for Jonas Wigander

Jonas Wigander

Change Program Manager, Ericsson AB
Change management, large scale System and SW development, PLM for SW, Continuous Everything and DevOps, Agile and Lean.



Friday May 24, 2019 11:00am - 12:30pm
E-4025 (4th Floor)

11:00am

Rotary Retrospective (Ferzeen Anis)

Abstract:
Whether you're a learner, a practitioner or an experienced facilitator, sometimes you need a new trick up your sleeve to help draw out sensitive issues in a light hearted manner. This retrospective format is super low effort, incredible amounts of fun, and surprisingly effective at mediating sensitive discussions, such as cultural norms or differences in workplace behaviours and customs. But the activity can just as easily be used as a great team building or ice breaking exercise!

Learning Outcomes:
  • A low effort, high impact, fun, insightful activity that can be used for retrospectives, team culture/contract building, ice breaker, or any other team building activity.


Speakers
avatar for Ferzeen Anis

Ferzeen Anis

Consultant | Agile Coach | Trainer
I'm a lifelong learner, passionate about learning and development, collaborative ways of working and effective communication. I coach teams to grow and foster an agile mindset, which helps them achieve workplace as well as customer satisfaction in complex environments - all while... Read More →


rotary pdf

Friday May 24, 2019 11:00am - 12:30pm
E-2023 (2nd Floor)

11:00am

Visual Thinking for the Visually Reticent (Michael Keeling, Rebecca Wirfs-Brock)

Abstract:
The best software developers make complex ideas understandable. One of the most powerful tools in our silver toolbox for helping us to do this is visual thinking. For software developers, this often means sketching. As kids we had little trouble expressing our ideas visually, but we’ve noticed that lots of adults have trouble putting pen to paper (or marker to whiteboard) to draw a picture of what’s on their mind. At some point along our journeys to earn diplomas and advanced degrees, many of us lost the ability to think visually and to effectively communicate using both visual and textual information effective.. Drawing complex ideas became difficult. This is a major problem for developers since our jobs require us to reason about and share complex ideas. Luckily, visual thinking skills can be improved with practice.

Visual thinking is a prerequisite for democratizing design. This means everyone needs the ability to think visually and persuasively communicate their ideas.. Drawing pictures – the right kinds of pictures – and using those pictures to tell stories and to convince others or to share our visions allows us to make the abstract more concrete, the complex seem simple. Think of it as a form of analytical literacy just as important as writing code or specifying user stories. In any democracy, education is the key to success and literacy is the basis of education. If our goal is to decentralize design authority among a team to enable greater agility, then the whole team needs the ability to think visually so they can effectively communicate spread the design ideas that enable decentralized decision making.

In this session we will learn about the theory behind visual thinking and how it applies to software design. We’ll also gain firsthand experience through practice. All participants will leave the session with a workbook they may use to continue advancing their visual thinking skills.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Use at least two visual thinking frameworks to help decide what to draw under varying circumstances.
  • Describe the benefits of visual thinking in the context of software design.
  • Share some tips and strategies with their teammates for practicing visual thinking and sketching.


Speakers
avatar for Michael Keeling

Michael Keeling

Staff Software Engineer, LendingHome
Michael Keeling is a software engineer at LendingHome and the author of Design It!: From Programmer to Software Architect. Prior to LendingHome, he worked at IBM on the Watson Discovery Service. Keeling has a Master of Science in Software Engineering from Carnegie Mellon University and a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science from the College of William and Mary... Read More →
avatar for Rebecca Wirfs-Brock

Rebecca Wirfs-Brock

Wirfs-Brock Associates
I'm best known as the "design geek" who invented Responsibility-Driven Design and the xDriven meme (think TDD, BDD, DDD..). I'm keen about team effectiveness, communicating complex requirements, software quality, agile QA, pragmatic TDD, and patterns and practices for architecting... Read More →


Friday May 24, 2019 11:00am - 12:30pm
E-4024 (4th Floor)

11:00am

PANEL: Business Agility – Agile’s Next Frontier?
Abstract:
Is “Business Agility” the next frontier for Agile? With increased visibility, companies are adopting agility into the diverse functions of their organizations – moving beyond engineering and IT – to operations, marketing, sales, human resources, and administration. Join our panel of experts as they discuss the latest agile trend and its implications for practitioners and businesses worldwide.



Speakers
avatar for Steven Fraser

Steven Fraser

Impresario & Principal Consultant, Innoxec (Innovation Executive Services)
Steven Fraser is based in Silicon Valley and has served as an innovation catalyst with global influence for HP, Cisco, Qualcomm, and Nortel. In addition to a year as a Visiting Scientist at Carnegie Mellon University’s Software Engineering Institute (SEI) consulting on domain engineering... Read More →
avatar for Steve Adolph

Steve Adolph

yet another agile coach, cprime
Serial Entrepreneur and Yet Another Agile Coach...I start a company, it fails, I go back to coaching. [repeat]. I've been designing systems (telephone switches, railway signalling) and managing systems development since the days of Fortran and 5 micron CMOS. Over the years I learned... Read More →
avatar for Annika Arnholt

Annika Arnholt

Principal Program Manager, Veritas Technologies, LLC
Annika Arnholt is Principal Program Manager at Veritas Technologies, LLC, which is headquartered in Silicon Valley. Born and raised in Minnesota, United States, she works out of their Roseville, MN office. Annika is currently business-focused, supporting 18 business areas, including... Read More →
avatar for Jutta ECKSTEIN

Jutta ECKSTEIN

Independent Coach, consultant, trainer and speaker
Jutta works as an independent coach, consultant, trainer, author, and speaker. She has helped many teams and organizations worldwide to make an agile transition. She has a unique experience in applying agile processes within medium-sized to large distributed mission-critical projects... Read More →
avatar for Nithyanandam "Mathi" Mathiyazhagan

Nithyanandam "Mathi" Mathiyazhagan

Lead Program Manager, Strategic Initiatives, John Hancock (ManuLife)
⬥ Program Lead with extensive experience in Business, Technology, and Knowledge Management. ⬥ Developed strategic solutions for operationalizing organizational product and Agile/DevOps strategies into programs/projects for creating business value. ⬥ Skilled at developing and... Read More →


Friday May 24, 2019 11:00am - 12:30pm
Auditorium /Auberge

11:00am

Experience Agile Coaching (Part I) - A tutorial to introduce agile coaching on both WHAT and HOW dimensions (Evelyn Tian)
Anticipated outcomes: 
  • Will arrive at shared understanding what Agile Coaching means and what to expect from an agile coach;
  • Be able to explain agile coaching competencies
  •  Be able to practice coaching skills during tutorial with XP technical practice related scenarios
  • Be able to apply facilitation skills in workshops and handle various situations
  • Be able to benefit from applying a practical coaching model in work and life
  •  Be able to continue learning to qualify for the Advanced Certified ScrumMaster (A-CSM) Program if interested
Desired audience: 
  • People who are interested in knowing more about Agile Coaching and experiencing its power;
  • People who want to advance their kills in supporting individuals, teams and organizations so that they can transform the world of work;
  • People who love to excel in facilitation with large workshops or small group discussions
  • People who are passionate in exploring the soft aspects of leadership, adding on to their solid technical experience

Speakers
avatar for Evelyn Tian

Evelyn Tian

Founder, Coach and Trainer, Evelyn Konsult AB
Canadian living in Sweden, a full-stack coach and trainer (from team level to C level) Main focuses on transformation strategy, product development improvement, and coaching capability development.


Friday May 24, 2019 11:00am - 12:30pm
E-2025 (2nd Floor)

11:30am

Evolution of Scrum Transcending Business Domains and the Future of Agile Management

Abstract:
The growing popularity of Agile management methods led to their application to a number of fields in the software development domain, including portfolio management, DevOps, distributed development, and architecture. However, research exploring whether and how Agile practices have been applied in domains outside of software and information systems development has been rather patchy. To address this gap in the research, in this article, we present the findings of our study on the application of Agile management practices in other domains, including an outlook towards a potential expansion enabling Business Agility.


Speakers
avatar for Richard Oprins

Richard Oprins

Post Experience Student, Leiden University
Last two years I have studied the application of Agile outside the domain of IT to finish my Master at Leiden University in the Netherlands. This was a real in-depth experience with Agile after having the experience of Agility transformation at EDS and working as product owner at... Read More →



Friday May 24, 2019 11:30am - 12:00pm
E-2022 (2nd Floor)

12:30pm

Lunch
Friday May 24, 2019 12:30pm - 1:30pm
Salle Pas Perdus (Lobby)

1:30pm

Agile Tests at Scale - from trenches. Really! (Marcelo Walter, Danilo Garcia)
Abstract:
Agile Test is still a practice not well solved in the agile teams. The theory is beautiful, consistent and accepted but when you see in the practice, the hard work to implement leads the teams to leave that.
The difficulties are very close: frameworks not so easy, non-adherent culture, lack of technologic support, lack of technical knowledge, too much legacy code, too much time to run all tests, and so on.
This session will show a way to cross these difficulties, addressing every issue with real cases of agile and automation test, learned past 20 years of experience. And working on a legacy, critical, giant system and scaling teams.

What did work? What didn’t? Where did we have to invest? Is there any shortcut?
It is a history that will benefit technical developers, managers, and agile enthusiasts since it shows how attitudes make the difference when talking about overcoming obstacles and evolving.

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
During the presentation, we expect to answer, in a practical approach, questions such as:
  •  How many automation is really needed?
  • How to structure the team?
  • How to deal with integration tests and external systems?
  •  How much of each kind of test implement, considering unit, functional, integrated, and UI?
  • What relation you have between investment and quality increasing?
  • How to obtain better execution efficiency, considering technical aspects?
  •  What about when running on a single machine is not an option?
  • Consider yet, having to scale more and more?
  • How to deal with complex scenarios where the solution depends on the timeline?
  • How to improve the performance of tests that depend on the data population?
  • What happens if you decide to change the development language along the way?
  • How to deal with intermittent test results?
  • And testing concurrency?
  •  How to automate tests with production data, combining performance and production settings?


Speakers
avatar for Danilo Garcia

Danilo Garcia

Agile Coach, Objective Solutions
For ten years he has been working with software development.He acts as an Agile Coach helping companies modernize management with agile methods like Scrum, Kanban and Management 3.0.As a trainer of the Scrum and Kanban methods, he conducts training focused on experimental learning... Read More →
avatar for Marcelo Walter

Marcelo Walter

Chapter Lead, Objective
Agile Enthusiast, I am working with software development for more than 20 years. Focused on high quality, simplicity and ‘fearless evolution’, I have experience with agile since 2001 leading teams using Extreme Programming, Scrum and Kanban. Active member of the community, my... Read More →



Friday May 24, 2019 1:30pm - 2:00pm
E-2023 (2nd Floor)

1:30pm

Corporate-level Communities at Ericsson: Parallel Organizational Structure for Fostering Alignment for Autonomy
Abstract:
Organizational management traditionally has taken care of all the important strategy, structure, and work-design decisions, as well as most of the ongoing decisions about work procedures. In large-scale corporations with many geographically distributed sites and high divisional detachment, such strat-egies are yet doomed to result in implementing irrelevant work methods and procedures that conflict with the local interests. As Tayloristic habits are disappearing, organizations willingly or unwillingly change their decision-making approaches to enable more participation and influence from the performers. These trends are associated with the rise of participation-based parallel structures, such as quality circles, task forces or communities of practice. In this paper, we present our findings from studying corporate-level communities by the means of a multi-case study at Ericsson. We found that the main hindrances are related to member selection, and achieving representation across the organizational units. Our results suggest that parallel structures highly depend on the authority of the members within their local communities, and their ability to not only channel the dialog between the units and the community and the corporate management, but also enable the active engagement of the unit in the community studies. As such, we believe that special attention shall be put on the ambassador role of the community members.



Speakers
avatar for Darja Smite

Darja Smite

Professor, Blekinge Institute of Technology
Interested in global software development and scaling agile, passionate about revealing the true impacts of offshoring.
avatar for Jonas Wigander

Jonas Wigander

Change Program Manager, Ericsson AB
Change management, large scale System and SW development, PLM for SW, Continuous Everything and DevOps, Agile and Lean.
avatar for Nils Brede Moe

Nils Brede Moe

Research Manager, SINTEF
I work with software process improvement, agile software develop- ment and global software development as a senior scientist at SINTEF Digital. My research interests are related to organizational, socio-technical, and global/distributed aspects. I wrote my thesis for the degree of... Read More →



Friday May 24, 2019 1:30pm - 2:00pm
E-2022 (2nd Floor)

1:30pm

Doctoral Symposium - Session III
The XP2019 Doctoral Symposium is intended to help PhD students at the beginning of their research career in software development. Experienced researchers will review research plans from the student participants and provide detailed feedback and guidance. Participation in the symposium is  solicited at three levels: doctoral students, advisors, and observers.

  • 13:30-14:15 Paper III: Mahmood Alsaadi and Alexei Lisitsa: Enhance the Auditability of Agile-XP Software Development Processes in the Context of Healthcare Regulations (FDA, MDD, and HIPAA) (student discussant: Nazish)
  • 14:15-15:00 Paper IV: Marthe Berntzen: Coordination in Large-Scale Agile Software Development (student discussant: Carin Lindskog)

Participation is by invitation. Please contact the Symposium organizers Casper Lassenius (casper.lassenius@aalto.fi)  for more information. This year marks the first year that the XP Doctoral Symposium will be co-located with the ICGSE (International Conference on Global Software Engineering) Doctoral Symposium.



Friday May 24, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm
x A-4458 (4th floor)

1:30pm

Introducing Chaos Programming as part of DevOps (Gurtej Pal Singh)

Abstract:
Traditional testing approaches can’t predict all failure modes and hence Chaos Engineering is a discipline to simulate these failures and build better applications. It’s a way to fire controlled disruptions into a distributed system and then analyzing the behavior, identifying the weak areas & improving resiliency with automation. To add chaos using DevOps and build anti fragile apps is the need.

Learning Outcomes:
  •  What is chaos engineering
  •  Does chaos engineering really helps
  • How it can be a part of Continuous engineering using DevOps
  • How to create disruption in the pre production environments and still function constructively.
  •  Go or No-Go


Speakers
avatar for Gurtej Pal Singh

Gurtej Pal Singh

Associate Director - Agile Service Delivery, LoyaltyOne
Enterprise Digital Strategy (Agile & DevOps) Roadmap & Transformation | Planning & Execution | Client Relationship | Technology Consulting | Hands-on Technology leader



Friday May 24, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm
E-4024 (4th Floor)

1:30pm

Learn About Kanban and Experience Flow with Okaloa Flowlab (Part I) (Interactive Simulation) (Adam Hsu, Deepali Shah)
Abstract:
The abstract concept of flow or a "pull system" is not easily understood by those who have not experienced it for themselves. Yet, the real pains of overburdening workers, lack of transparency, and degrading quality are all too familiar and widely felt across entire organizations when work is "pushed" on individuals and teams in the name of resource efficiency. Standard attempts to educate management through rational explanations of lean thinking along with the values and principles of agility are generally ignored, and soon requests for velocity metrics to show points per sprint, points per team and points per person are mandatory measures to show an expected increases in efficiencies as a result of "going agile".
Does this closely describe a pattern you have observed or specifically your situation? If so, you might be asking: "Is there a more effective way of ingraining managers with the knowledge that any work method that does not address balancing demand with capability to achieve flow will likely revert back to a push system?"

The answer: YES! Okaloa Flowlab is a simulation tool that provides experiential learning through simulations and experiments, which enable participants to gain a deeper learning of flow through actual experience. Creator, Patrick Steyaert, created Okaloa Flowlab for the purpose of giving teams the experience between pushing work versus pulling work through a system.
"Experiential learning is the process of learning through and is specifically defined as learning through reflection on doing." (Source: Wikipedia)

In this workshop participants will participate in a highly interactive hands-on simulation to learn about flow through actual experience, reflection and decisions they will make about the policies that affect how work flows through a system. Participants will also gain a deeper understanding of Kanban and the general practices that enable flow to occur: Visualize, Limit Work-in-Progress, Make Policies Explicit, Manage Workflow, Implement Feedback Loops, Improve Collaboratively and Evolve Experimentally.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understanding for the importance of visualizing knowledge work in order to understand where work exists in a system via simulation
  • Understanding of what causes work to queue-up and slow down by experiencing a system that is at first overburdened
  • Understanding that policies will either help or hinder how work flows through a system by experimenting with incremental policy changes
  • Understanding about the correlation of limiting work-in-progress to focus, collaboration, and quality through reflection of experimentation
  • Understanding about how Lead Time is directly impacted by Work-In-Progress and Throughput of a system as stated by Little's Law


Speakers
avatar for Adam Hsu

Adam Hsu

Organizational Coach, JPMorgan Chase
Adam Hsu is member of a team of coaches in Global Technology at JPMorgan Chase focused on enabling organizational and business agility at every level of the organization. Adam's approach to coaching is grounded in the principles of Socio-Technical Systems theory with a focus on emergent... Read More →



Friday May 24, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm
E-4025 (4th Floor)

1:30pm

Experience Agile Coaching (Part II) - A tutorial to introduce agile coaching on both WHAT and HOW dimensions (Evelyn Tian)
Anticipated outcomes: 
  • Will arrive at shared understanding what Agile Coaching means and what to expect from an agile coach;
  • Be able to explain agile coaching competencies
  •  Be able to practice coaching skills during tutorial with XP technical practice related scenarios
  • Be able to apply facilitation skills in workshops and handle various situations
  • Be able to benefit from applying a practical coaching model in work and life
  •  Be able to continue learning to qualify for the Advanced Certified ScrumMaster (A-CSM) Program if interested
Desired audience: 
  • People who are interested in knowing more about Agile Coaching and experiencing its power;
  • People who want to advance their kills in supporting individuals, teams and organizations so that they can transform the world of work;
  • People who love to excel in facilitation with large workshops or small group discussions
  • People who are passionate in exploring the soft aspects of leadership, adding on to their solid technical experience

Speakers
avatar for Evelyn Tian

Evelyn Tian

Founder, Coach and Trainer, Evelyn Konsult AB
Canadian living in Sweden, a full-stack coach and trainer (from team level to C level) Main focuses on transformation strategy, product development improvement, and coaching capability development.


Friday May 24, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm
E-2025 (2nd Floor)

1:30pm

Reinventing DevOps Practices for Blockchain Applications (Rejikrishnan Rajan, Ranjith Tharayil)

Abstract:
With the arrival of distributed applications that run on Blockchain, it is essential to rethink some of the basic aspects of DevOps. Few things that we take for granted in DevOps area are either irrelevant, impossible or too costly for blockchain applications. Join us to explore the changes that the blockchain apps bring to the DevOps arena, using a hands-on demo of a sample blockchain app.

Learning Outcomes:
  • An understanding of Blockchain as a fieldHow Blockchain apps are different from traditional apps?
  • Some insights on architectural considerations of Blockchain apps
  • A quick overview of tools involved in this areaHow to implement DevOps in Blockchain apps?
  • Inspiration to try out few things in this niche area


Speakers
avatar for Rejikrishnan Rajan

Rejikrishnan Rajan

Agile Tech/DevOps coach, Accenture Solutions Pvt Ltd
Rejikrishnan is an Enterprise Tech coach, Agile Coach, Technology architect, Software Craftsman at Accenture-SolutionsIQ who helps to create a happy environment and works with a community of professionals in the organization. He lives in India and spends his leisure time learning... Read More →
avatar for Ranjith Tharayil

Ranjith Tharayil

Shepherd , Agile Engineering practices, Accenture | SolutionsIQ
Ranjith Tharayil is an accomplished innovator, software craftsman and an inspirational servant leader, with over a decade's experience in the software industry. He is currently Head, Agile Engineering practices India, Accenture |SolutionsIQ and specializes in strategizing and planning... Read More →



Friday May 24, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm
E-2024 (2nd Floor)

2:00pm

Technical debt leading to a company crisis (Anton Bevzuk)
Abstract (delivered by video on an exceptional basis):

Dodo Pizza IT team grew from 2 developers serving one country to 60 people serving 11 countries over the course of 7 years. I rebuilt our processes and implemented some engineering practices, but this was too slow. It was not clear how to organize the quality work of several teams on a single product.
We are too carried away with the development of business features and have accumulated too much architectural technical debt. When marketing launched an advertising campaign in 2018, we couldn’t stand the load and fell down. It was a shame. But during the crisis, working in an extreme mode, we realized that we can work many times more efficiently. The crisis has pushed us towards revolutionary changes in processes and the rapid introduction of best-known engineering practices.
After the crisis, we took the LeSS framework as a basis and imposed a number of engineering practices on it. Some of them worked perfectly, while others did not. For example:
  • Try: Feature-teams
    During the crisis, we worked in teams that made a feature from start to finish and were not dependent on anyone. It was great. After that, most of our teams are cross-functional and cross-component feature-teams.
  • Avoid: Unstable teams
    During the crisis, the composition of the team was chosen for a specific task. But we quickly realized that it was much more comfortable for developers to work in stable teams.
  • Try: Stop the line
    The more changes you make between releases, the more risky each release is. We stop development if the release takes more than 48 hours and focus on eliminating the causes of the delay. Over several stops, we significantly stabilized and accelerated the deployment pipeline.
  • Avoid: Bug fixing team
    Previously, we had a separate team for bug fixing. Now, after introducing the practice of Zero bugs policy, this team become redundant.
We have built an efficient process in which 9 feature teams work on a single product in a common code. We learned how to combine business development and gradually improve the quality of code and tests. We split the monolith into microservices and use the DDD approach. Our process has not yet been settled, so we continue to experiment with engineering and process practices. But we firmly know that the focus on technical excellence is a guarantee of the stable development of our business.

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • Engineering practices protect business from crisis
  • Do not accumulate technical debt. It may be too late and cost too high.
  • Evolutionary changes take several times longer than revolutionary ones.
  • Crisis is not always a bad thing. Use crisis to revolutionize processes.
  • However, a long evolutionary preparation is required in advance.
  • Do not blindly implement all the practices that you like. Some practices are waiting in the wings, and when he comes, the teams will use them without resistance. Wait for the right moment.
  • Over time, the teams themselves begin to make strong decisions and implement them.


Speakers
avatar for Anton Bevzuk

Anton Bevzuk

Chief Agile Officer, Dodo Pizza


Friday May 24, 2019 2:00pm - 2:30pm
E-2023 (2nd Floor)

2:00pm

Scaling Agile beyond Organizational Boundaries: Coordination Challenges in Software Ecosystems
Abstract:
The shift from sequential to agile software development originates from relatively small and co-located teams but soon gained prominence in larger organizations. How to apply and scale agile practices to fit the needs of larger projects has been studied to quite an extent in previous research. However, scaling agile beyond organizational boundaries, for instance in a software ecosystem context, raises additional challenges that existing studies and approaches do not yet investigate or address in great detail. For that reason, we conducted a case study in two software ecosystems that comprise several agile actors from different organizations and, thereby, scale development across organizational boundaries, in order to elaborate and understand their coordination challenges. Our results indicate that most of the identified challenges are caused by long communication paths and a lack of established processes to facilitate these paths. As a result, the participants in our study, among others, experience insufficient responsivity, insufficient communication of prioritizations and deliverables, and alterations or loss of information. As a consequence, agile practices need to be extended to fit the identified needs.




Friday May 24, 2019 2:00pm - 2:30pm
E-2022 (2nd Floor)

2:30pm

Enterprise agility: A Balancing Act. A local government case study

Abstract:
Austerity and financial constraints have been threatening the public sector in the UK for a number of years. Foreseeing the threat of continued budget cuts, and addressing the situation many local councils face, requires internal transformations that help achieve financial stability without losing the key public service focus of their existence. Agile transformations have been undertaken by organisations wanting to learn from agile and bringing agile principles into the wider organisation. This paper describes and analyses an ongoing behaviour-led transformation in a district council in the UK. It presents the results of the analysis of a series of interviews with internal stakeholders at the council, of observations of different meetings among senior and middle management in the period of January to May 2018. The paper explores the successes and the challenges encountered at the end of the transformation process and reflects on the balancing acts that need to be considered to address the challenges. We also suggest that behaviours on their own cannot guarantee a sustained agile culture. For large-scale agile software development transformations, we highlight the importance of considering organization-wide factors to sustain change in the long term.

Learning Outcomes:
  • .


Speakers
LB

Leonor Barroca

Senior lecturer, The Open University
avatar for Torgeir Dingsøyr

Torgeir Dingsøyr

chief scientist, SINTEF
Torgeir Dingsøyr has studied teamwork and learning in software development, as well as development methods for large software projects and programs. He is chief scientist at the SINTEF research foundation, which is recognized as one of the leading research environments in the world... Read More →


Friday May 24, 2019 2:30pm - 3:00pm
E-2022 (2nd Floor)

3:00pm

Break
Friday May 24, 2019 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Salle Pas Perdus (Lobby)

3:30pm

Accelerating organizational growth using inspiration from parliamentary procedure (Anastas Stoyanovksy, William Chaparro)
Abstract:
Transitioning a growing development team into smaller, mission-oriented sub-teams is challenging, particularly until a collaborative decision making process for shared concerns is agreed upon. Within the framework of XP, we hypothesize that this challenge comes from a fracturing of shared understanding as those sub-teams form and storm. In order to navigate this process and re-establish that shared understanding, we took inspiration from Robert's Rules of Order, Newly Revised (RONR), which is the most widely used manual of parliamentary procedure in the United States.

Some of the specific inspirations we drew from RONR were to establish a formal charter and bylaws, treating our wider development team as a formal organization; we reimagined and redefined these and other formalities in terms of Agile ceremonies and XP practices. We will describe the integrated framework we developed and will share our experience implementing it at IBM Watson to foresee and ease organizational growing pains, accelerating the onboarding process and allowing our organization to grow more effectively.

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • By the end of the session, attendees will have a better sense for how growing teams can establish guidelines for decision making to ensure better communication and knowledge sharing.
  • A historical view of the evolution of self-organization of groups that have shared values or goals.
  • Example rules of order guidelines that they can take back to their teams.


Speakers
avatar for William Chaparro

William Chaparro

Senior manager, IBM
Will Chaparro is a senior manager at IBM Watson who has spent over 5 years leading teams building cloud based information retrieval systems. Before his current role, he spent 5 years as a senior managing consultant in IBM GBS, and over ten years as a software engineer, designing... Read More →
AS

Anastas Stoyanovsky

Senior Software Engineer, IBM Watson



Friday May 24, 2019 3:30pm - 4:00pm
E-2023 (2nd Floor)

3:30pm

Learn About Kanban and Experience Flow with Okaloa Flowlab (Interactive Simulation) (Part II) (Adam Hsu, Deepali Shah)
Abstract:
The abstract concept of flow or a "pull system" is not easily understood by those who have not experienced it for themselves. Yet, the real pains of overburdening workers, lack of transparency, and degrading quality are all too familiar and widely felt across entire organizations when work is "pushed" on individuals and teams in the name of resource efficiency. Standard attempts to educate management through rational explanations of lean thinking along with the values and principles of agility are generally ignored, and soon requests for velocity metrics to show points per sprint, points per team and points per person are mandatory measures to show an expected increases in efficiencies as a result of "going agile".
Does this closely describe a pattern you have observed or specifically your situation? If so, you might be asking: "Is there a more effective way of ingraining managers with the knowledge that any work method that does not address balancing demand with capability to achieve flow will likely revert back to a push system?"

The answer: YES! Okaloa Flowlab is a simulation tool that provides experiential learning through simulations and experiments, which enable participants to gain a deeper learning of flow through actual experience. Creator, Patrick Steyaert, created Okaloa Flowlab for the purpose of giving teams the experience between pushing work versus pulling work through a system.
"Experiential learning is the process of learning through and is specifically defined as learning through reflection on doing." (Source: Wikipedia)

In this workshop participants will participate in a highly interactive hands-on simulation to learn about flow through actual experience, reflection and decisions they will make about the policies that affect how work flows through a system. Participants will also gain a deeper understanding of Kanban and the general practices that enable flow to occur: Visualize, Limit Work-in-Progress, Make Policies Explicit, Manage Workflow, Implement Feedback Loops, Improve Collaboratively and Evolve Experimentally.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understanding for the importance of visualizing knowledge work in order to understand where work exists in a system via simulation
  • Understanding of what causes work to queue-up and slow down by experiencing a system that is at first overburdened
  • Understanding that policies will either help or hinder how work flows through a system by experimenting with incremental policy changes
  • Understanding about the correlation of limiting work-in-progress to focus, collaboration, and quality through reflection of experimentation
  • Understanding about how Lead Time is directly impacted by Work-In-Progress and Throughput of a system as stated by Little's Law


Speakers
avatar for Adam Hsu

Adam Hsu

Organizational Coach, JPMorgan Chase
Adam Hsu is member of a team of coaches in Global Technology at JPMorgan Chase focused on enabling organizational and business agility at every level of the organization. Adam's approach to coaching is grounded in the principles of Socio-Technical Systems theory with a focus on emergent... Read More →



Friday May 24, 2019 3:30pm - 5:00pm
E-4025 (4th Floor)

3:30pm

The Agile Way to Architect Web Apps (Doguhan Uluca)
Presentation slides: https://slides.com/doguhanuluca/agile-web-app-architecture

Abstract:


Scrum has really harmed software development. Teams rush to implement features in their first sprint without first building a roadmap, then a few months later the team realize they've been going down the wrong path resulting in rework, frustration and loss of trust.
The router-first approach to SPA architecture enables developers to start small, with a decoupled and lazy-loaded architecture, giving them the option to stay small or scale while achieving sub-second first meaningful paints.

Router-first architecture is designed to force teams to ask the hard questions early, build a roadmap and then iterate over a solution.
Router-first
• Enforces high-level thinking,
• Ensures consensus on features, before coding starts,
• Plans on code and team to grow,
• Keeps engineering overhead low.
I'll share real-world statistics about how this methodology helped my team.
These concepts are demonstrated through my Lemon Mart app on GitHub and in my book: Angular 6 for Enterprise-Ready Web Applications, May 2018, Packt Publishing.

Learning Outcomes:
By establishing the right architecture learn how to:
  •  Enforce high-level thinking,
  •  Ensure consensus on features, before coding starts,
  •  Plan on code and team to grow,
  • Keep engineering overhead low.


Speakers
avatar for Doguhan Uluca

Doguhan Uluca

Technical Fellow, Excella
Doguhan is a Technical Fellow at Excella, based out of Washington, DC. He is the author of books Angular 6 for Enterprise-Ready Web Applications and Building Large-Scale Web Applications with Angular. He is a speaker at international conferences like Ng-Conf, Angular Mix, CodeStock... Read More →



Friday May 24, 2019 3:30pm - 5:00pm
E-2022 (2nd Floor)

3:30pm

Upping your Agile transformation game with Organizational Excellence (Dan Diep)

Abstract:
This is not just another typical Agile transformation talk. I’ll take you on a three year journey about OpenX’s multiple false starts and how eventually, with CTO support, we upped our game with Organizational Excellence because the “Agile transformation” carried too much baggages. I’ll share the lessons learned from the failed attempts. Conversely, I’ll go through in detail on how we’re on our way to Organizational Excellence. We’ll explore what traits and characteristics of an organization will set it up for success.

Learning Outcomes:
  • What does Agile transformation look like with and without executive sponsor?
  • Upping your transformation game with Organizational Excellence
  • Organization team structure lessons learned
  • What are some of the non-negotiables during transformation?
  • What attributes and organizational traits gives you the best chance of succeeding?
  • Learn how OpenX has overcome scaling challenges


Speakers
avatar for Dan Diep

Dan Diep

Enterprise Agile Coach, OpenX
Dan is the Sr. Manager of Agile Excellence at OpenX with over 18 years of professional experience of which for the past 10 years honing in his Agile craftsmanship. He’s currently leading OpenX’s Agile transformation with a team of Scrum Masters. As a passionate Agile practitioner... Read More →



Friday May 24, 2019 3:30pm - 5:00pm
E-4024 (4th Floor)

3:30pm

Experience Agile Coaching (Part III) - A tutorial to introduce agile coaching on both WHAT and HOW dimensions (Evelyn Tian)
Anticipated outcomes: 
  • Will arrive at shared understanding what Agile Coaching means and what to expect from an agile coach;
  • Be able to explain agile coaching competencies
  •  Be able to practice coaching skills during tutorial with XP technical practice related scenarios
  • Be able to apply facilitation skills in workshops and handle various situations
  • Be able to benefit from applying a practical coaching model in work and life
  •  Be able to continue learning to qualify for the Advanced Certified ScrumMaster (A-CSM) Program if interested
Desired audience: 
  • People who are interested in knowing more about Agile Coaching and experiencing its power;
  • People who want to advance their kills in supporting individuals, teams and organizations so that they can transform the world of work;
  • People who love to excel in facilitation with large workshops or small group discussions
  • People who are passionate in exploring the soft aspects of leadership, adding on to their solid technical experience

Speakers
avatar for Evelyn Tian

Evelyn Tian

Founder, Coach and Trainer, Evelyn Konsult AB
Canadian living in Sweden, a full-stack coach and trainer (from team level to C level) Main focuses on transformation strategy, product development improvement, and coaching capability development.


Friday May 24, 2019 3:30pm - 5:00pm
E-2025 (2nd Floor)

3:30pm

Fast Feedback - The Key to Business Agility (David Grabel)

Abstract:
Software engineers get feedback from their development environment and automated test suites in real-time. They get feedback from QA engineers in a day or less. Errors can be fixed and verified in minutes. On the other hand, feedback from stakeholders outside of technology takes days and the “feedback frenzies” can drag on for weeks or even months. It is time for “the business” to dramatically reduce lead time and deliver value quicker without sacrificing quality. Fast feedback is the key to unlocking business agility.
Agile enables organizations to deliver value to customers faster. It took decades for software developers to reduce their delivery cycles from years to weeks or days. Fast feedback for testing and fixing was a significant driver of this acceleration. Companies should keep this lesson in mind as they bring Agile across the enterprise.
Today, feedback on creative designs, user experience, projects, programs, budgets, and contracts can take weeks, delaying the business outcomes. This workshop will provide methods, tips, and techniques to shorten those cycles to minutes. It starts by showing you how value stream mapping can highlight feedback loops which typically introduce significant delays. This helps to identify opportunities for dramatically faster feedback, allowing people outside of technology to complete stories and deliver value within a sprint. You will also hear how creative teams are learning from and adapting modern software techniques that build feedback into their processes in order to accelerate delivery from business teams.

Learning Outcomes:
  • The value of fast delivery
  • Sources of delay, particularly outside of IT
  • How to create a value stream map and use it to identify opportunities to reduce lead time
  • How to calculate process efficiency
  • How to identify high value and low value feedback
  • How to use experiments to safely eliminate feedback frenzies


Speakers
avatar for David Grabel

David Grabel

Enterprise Agile Coach, Grabel Consulting Services
David Grabel is an enterprise agile coach at The Eliassen Group, currently consulting at Fidelity Investments. He is helping them implement Fidelity's version of the Spotify model. He is coaching Tribe, Squad, and Chapter leaders to unite the business and technology people in cross-functional... Read More →



Friday May 24, 2019 3:30pm - 5:00pm
E-2024 (2nd Floor)

4:00pm

Learning Agile: The NeverEnding Story (Mark Rajpal)
Abstract:
Everyone has a different Agile journey. But there is one similarity in that the journey (i.e. the learning) never ends.

The importance of this NeverEnding story cannot be understated as Agile continues to evolve. Today's Agilists need to find creative ways to continue their learning and provide learning to others.
These learnings can be described in 5 key areas with each learning area representing an opportunity for Agilists to further their knowledge.

We all know that learning can be an immense time commitment. In many instances the financial commitment is just as important but gaining approval can be difficult. Both time and financial commitments are necessary to fully appreciate the 5 key learning areas:
  • Individual
  • Intra-Team
  • Inter-Team
  • Within the Organization
  • Outside the Organization

The Agile Manifesto was written almost 20 years ago. If Agile were a fad, it would have surely died by now. Instead, it has continued to evolve and 5 years from now it will look much different than it does today. That is why it is so important for the learning to continue. The further you fall behind, the longer it will take to catch up. Learning doesn't have to be an onerous process. Making it part of your daily life ensures the learning continues and makes it more fun.

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • The learning never stops because you'll never know everything.
  • Agile will continue to evolve so you need to find creative ways to keep up.
  • Individual learning is important but it's not enough.
  • One of the best ways of learning something is not only to practice it but also teach it to someone else.
  • Everybody learns differently.
  • Strong leadership is required to foster a culture of learning.
  • You need to figure out which methods to apply to the learning areas because it will be different for everyone.


Speakers
avatar for Mark Rajpal

Mark Rajpal

Principal Consultant, Agile Global Results
Mark is a Principal Consultant with Agile Global Results and has over 15 years in software development and over 10 years of Agile experience. He is customer and quality driven, and his desire to learn and excel has led him to obtain an impressive array of over 20 designations. He... Read More →


Friday May 24, 2019 4:00pm - 4:30pm
E-2023 (2nd Floor)

4:30pm

Feature Parity in 25% of the Developer Hours (Quinn Gil)
Abstract:
We developed native mobile applications with the same feature set across three platforms: iOS, Android and Windows Store. Nine months into the development of iOS and Android; you’re tasked with delivering the same feature set with half the engineers and you only have seven months. All three need to be released around the same time.
Half the team and half the time – How we used XP to deliver feature parity in 25% of the developer hours.

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • Adoption of different is hard. We released feature parity with only 25% of the developer hours using very different coding technical practices. There is resistance by others to even try writing code this way. Simply showing it CAN be faster and better isn't enough for people to try something different.
  •  I believed XP, OOP, and refactoring combined could accelerate a product timeline before taking on this product. Delivering in 25% of the developer hours proved that they can. It takes A LOT of discipline to do it though.
  •  There needs to be a strong and core set of hands-on-keyboard technical practices that work together to produce highly maintainable code. The ones we identified before and found during keep complexity out of the code.
  • An amusing lesson learned to me is how design patterns just ‘appear’ in the code. I learned that you don’t plan structure around design patterns, you improve structure when you recognize a design pattern emerging


Speakers
avatar for Quinn Gil

Quinn Gil

Software Crafter
Quinn got hooked on programming in a computer introduction course. For over 20 years, he's never gone more than a couple months without programming something; even while getting a degree in physics. Quinn has always been looking for ways to improve the code he writes, and the code... Read More →



Friday May 24, 2019 4:30pm - 5:00pm
E-2023 (2nd Floor)
 
Saturday, May 25
 

8:00am

Registration Open
Saturday May 25, 2019 8:00am - 3:00pm
Salle Pas Perdus (Lobby)

8:30am

Open Jam Huddle
Speakers
avatar for Ainsley Nies

Ainsley Nies

Principal, Acorn Consulting Enterprises
As an independent consultant, Ainsley’s work is focused on the development of sustainable environments for learning and continuous improvement. She enjoys using a variety of approaches, including chartering, retrospectives, Open Space Technology, and World Café, to enable clients... Read More →


Saturday May 25, 2019 8:30am - 9:00am
XP Open Jam 2019.

9:00am

Leadership Symposium Welcome
Leadership Symposium Welcome

Speakers
avatar for Steve Adolph

Steve Adolph

yet another agile coach, cprime
Serial Entrepreneur and Yet Another Agile Coach...I start a company, it fails, I go back to coaching. [repeat]. I've been designing systems (telephone switches, railway signalling) and managing systems development since the days of Fortran and 5 micron CMOS. Over the years I learned... Read More →


Saturday May 25, 2019 9:00am - 9:30am
E-4024 (4th Floor)

9:00am

Educators Symposium Session I - Agile Methods in University Courses
Welcome & Introduction (30 mins)

Teaching Agile to non-IT Professionals - From Agile Software
Development to Agile Organisations
(30 mins)

In recent years, agile methodologies have become more and more widespread, even outside the IT-domain. Digitalization and other trends have sparked the interest to transform whole organizations. At the University of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland (FHNW), we have developed a new continuous education course on this topic (CAS Agile Organisations – Certificate of Advanced Studies in Agile Organisations). The course especially addresses professionals and managers from non-IT domains, who plan to change their organisations into agile organisations. The course focusses on the aspects of personal agility, team agility, as well as organisational agility, and discusses the transformation to an agile organisation. Last October, the course started with 20 non-IT professionals with different backgrounds and levels of experience. At the time of writing this, all 20 students are in the process of graduating.

In this workshop, we will present the content of the curriculum and discuss the challenges we faced when teaching students with no IT-background. Developing the curriculum was a difficult task, since agility traditionally stems from software development and we had to carefully replace technical practices because they cannot be applied outside the IT-industry. During the course, we collected extensive feedback and we will discuss the lessons-learned.


Bringing Mob Programming to Class: Industry-Inspired Collaborative
Programming Environment for Project-Based Learning in the Classroom
(30 mins)

We propose an interactive session to demonstrate Online Mob Programming (OMP), which is an adaptation of the industrial practice of mob programming for groups of students to learn together. We propose to demonstrate a sample OMP lesson which we have embedded into the AWS Cloud9 IDE, share our findings so far based on using OMP in classes at Carnegie Mellon University, as well as solicit ideas from participants on how OMP can be improved to further improve student learning.


Speakers
avatar for Martin Kroop

Martin Kroop

Professor for Software Engineering, University of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland
Martin is professor for Software Engineering at the Institute of Mobile and Distributed Systems at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland. His main interest is in everything that makes software development more efficient, including build automation, testing... Read More →
AM

Andreas Meier

Lecturer / Researcher, Zurich University of Applied Sciences



Saturday May 25, 2019 9:00am - 10:30am
E-2022 (2nd Floor)

9:00am

1st Int Workshop on Agile Transformation (Session I) (Torgeir Dingsøyr, Leonor Barroca)
Abstract:
Many organisations are adopting agile approaches, not only in their IT department, but increasingly across the whole organisation. The process of introducing agile practices in organisations is called an "agile transformation". In a review article published in 2016, Dikert et al. identify a number of challenges in agile transformations, such as resistance to change, lack of investment (training, coaching, lack of physical rearrangement to suit new ways of work), agile being "difficult to implement", challenges with coordination across teams, and that different approaches emerge in multi-team environments. The review focuses on software development organisations although many of the challenges identified are not necessarily specific to software development. As organisations increasingly engage in agile transformation processes, advice today is dominated by consultants and from experience reports. Researchers have suggested to understand agile transformation processes through sociotechnical theory, change management theory and we believe that there are a number of other fields to learn from to understand and improve the outcome of agile transformation processes.

We would like to challenge the scientific community to identify what should be of prime interest for researchers in this area, as there are growing opportunities to study agile transformation as companies increasingly adopt new large-scale agile frameworks. Organisations are learning from agile practice to embrace agility in their ways of working; agile practitioners can also benefit from the wider context of organisations undergoing agile transformations, to understand the wider implications of large-scale transformations and how to sustain them. We will create a workshop to provide an interactive arena for knowledge sharing and exchange of experiences between academics and practitioners.

Schedule:
09:15- The agile transformation at Volvo Cars Lucas Gren
09:35- Agile transformation explained under the lens of management innovation implementation Akim Berkani
09:55- “Don’t throw the baby out with the bath water” - agile transformation from the trenches
Johannes Berglind Söderqvist, Ludvig Lindlöf, Lars Trygg and Rashina Hoda
10:15- Head, Heart and Hands Katie Taylor

Speakers
LB

Leonor Barroca

Senior lecturer, The Open University
avatar for Torgeir Dingsøyr

Torgeir Dingsøyr

chief scientist, SINTEF
Torgeir Dingsøyr has studied teamwork and learning in software development, as well as development methods for large software projects and programs. He is chief scientist at the SINTEF research foundation, which is recognized as one of the leading research environments in the world... Read More →



Saturday May 25, 2019 9:00am - 10:30am
E-2024 (2nd Floor)

9:00am

A Grand Coding Challenge! Finding a New Largest Known Prime (Part I)
 Abstract:
The quest to discover a new largest known prime has been ongoing for centuries. Those seeking to break the record for the largest known prime have pushed the bounds of computing. We have come a long way since the 1970s when the instructor, Landon Noll, as a high school student discovered a 6533-digit prime. Today’s largest known prime is almost 25 million digits long! Those seeking to break the record for the largest known prime have pushed the bounds of computing. The development of these extreme primality testing programs offers important lessons today for those who must write code which must work
correctly, even in the face of hardware errors, from the very first implementation.

To encourage the discovery of ever-larger primes, awards of $150000 and $250000 are offered to the first published proof of a discovery of a prime of at least 100 million and 1 billion digits respectively. The search for the largest known prime requires writing and running code that must run to completion, without any errors, throughout the entire proof of primality! A significant quality effort is required to write 100% error-free code. The calculations required to test extremely large numbers for primality must be fault resilient. One must overcome compiler and assembler errors, errors introduced by the kernel, and hardware errors such as memory errors and CPU calculation errors. The world record goes neither to the fastest coder nor to the person with the fastest hardware but rather to the first result that is proven to be correct. The reason for such extreme programming is that the length of the calculations exceeds the mean time to error of the calculating system. The motivation for such extreme care lies in the fact that a slow and correct answer is infinitely preferable to a fast but incorrect answer.

In this tutorial you will learn about the state of the art of searching for and proving the primality of very large numbers. How are these large primes discovered? What are some of the best ways to find a new world record-sized prime number? These and other prime questions will be explored. We will examine software and hardware-based approaches and will look at code fragments and hardware machine state diagrams.

Speakers

Saturday May 25, 2019 9:00am - 10:30am
E-2025 (2nd Floor)

9:00am

Large Scale Agile Development (Part I) (Julian Bass)
Abstract:
Agile software development methods are conventionally applied in small, collocated development teams. There is growing interest, from researchers and practitioners, in agile methods applied to large-scale projects with several cooperating teams developing complex systems.
Large-scale agile is now a hot topic in software engineering. Agile frameworks, with all their benefits and challenges are being widely discussed and applied. The IEEE Software special issue on large-scale agile put together by Torgeir Dingsøyr, Davide Falessi and Ken Power is expected to come out in Mar./Apr. 2019.
How to apply agile methods to large projects was identified as the "top burning research question" by practitioners at XP2010. At XP2013 to XP2018, this workshop has addressed research challenges in large-scale agile development and identified topics such as inter-team coordination, large project organization, release planning and architecture and practices to scaling agile methods

Schedule:
9:00 - Opening Julian Bass
9:05 – Keynote Scaling Parallel Organisational Structures: The Spotify Guilds' Story Darja Šmite
9:45 – Research Paper 1: SAFe Adoptions in Finland: A Survey Research Maarit Laanti and Petri Kettunen
10:00 – Research Paper 2: Comparing Scaling Agile Frameworks Based on Underlying Practices Sven Theobald, Anna Schmitt 
10:15 – Research Paper 3: Finnish Large-Scale Agile Transformations: A Survey Study Petri Kettunen, Maarit Laanti, Fabian Fagerholm, Tommi Mikkonen and Tomi Männistö



Speakers
ST

Sven Theobald

Researcher, Fraunhofer IESE
avatar for Julian Bass

Julian Bass

Senior Lecturer, University of Salford
I have developed an inventory of activities and behaviours for product owners in large-scale agile development programmes. Check out the articles on large-scale agile in the Mar./Apr. 2019 issue of IEEE Software.
avatar for Darja Smite

Darja Smite

Professor, Blekinge Institute of Technology
Interested in global software development and scaling agile, passionate about revealing the true impacts of offshoring.



Saturday May 25, 2019 9:00am - 10:30am
E-4025 (4th Floor)

9:00am

Sensemaking in organizations (Part I): How to create a practical Cynefin and sensemaking process (Ken Power, Tony Quinlan)
Abstract:
The Cynefin sensemaking framework has grown in popularity in the agile community in recent years. Used to its full potential, sensemaking and the Cynefin framework are powerful and effective approaches to informing action in complex, dynamic, and uncertain situations. Ken and Tony will introduce a practical, effective approach based on their work applying complexity techniques in large global technology organisations. This workshop, based on years of experience with dozens of sensemaking projects, will teach you the fundamentals of using micronarrative-based sensemaking and the Cynefin framework to foster transformation, resilience and agility.

This session will focus on use of sensemkaing to support transformations. You will learn about sensemaking in organizaitons, the Cynefin framework, how to determine appropriate action in a given context, how to design experiments for navigating complex situations, how to tailor a sensemaking framework for a particular purpose, and how to integrate sensemaking into your organizaiton.

Learning Outcomes:
Learning outcomes from this workshop include:
  • An understanding of the Cynefin framework, or a refresher for those who have already come across it
  •  Understanding of sensemaking and where it is useful and appropriate in organisations
  •  Tips for designing a sensemaking framework
  • Feedback and action process - elements of cadence and timing - how often do we have action-focused workshops
  •  How to integrate sensemaking into the cadence of the organization
  • Ensuring different parts of the organisation are represented in the sensemaking and experiment design
  • Getting people to pay attention to the results and take action informed by those results


Speakers
avatar for Ken Power

Ken Power

Software Engineering Leader, https://kenpower.dev/
Ken Power has held multiple positions in large technology organizations. His current responsibilities include leading global, large-scale engineering organization transformations. He has been working with agile and lean methods since 1999. He holds patents in virtualization and network... Read More →
avatar for Tony Quinlan

Tony Quinlan

CEO & Chief Storyteller, Narrate
Complexity, Cynefin and sense-making. Understanding the cultural landscape and making enough sense to take action. Running workshops for organisations to co-create interventions and strategies for transformation. Using SenseMaker to measure the impact of change programmes.


Saturday May 25, 2019 9:00am - 10:30am
E-2023 (2nd Floor)

9:00am

Open Jam

Open Jam is an informal, lightly structured discussion space that runs each day of the XP2019 Core Conference and the final Tutorial-Workshop-Symposium Day. It’s where XP2019 attendees gather to introduce their ideas while building off of one another's creativity. Open Jam is a place where you can just sit and relax, mull things over or just be. Emergent sessions often appear – “Lean Coffee” anyone?

“Open Jam” is not the same as “Open Space” which has run at previous XP Conferences, although it shares similar principles of self-organization. Sessions on any topic are scheduled for the day they are proposed. Conference speakers may often hold an Open Jam session for follow-up Q&A.

Starting on Wednesday, May 22, each XP2019 Conference day will begin with an “Open Jam Huddle” at 8:30 am with proposals for that day’s Open Jam. Participants are invited to add their session to the schedule display board, then announced it in the area. New sessions may be added throughout the day as long as there are time slots, available. Information on sessions proposed after the Huddle will be tweeted to #XPOJ2019.

Speakers
avatar for Ainsley Nies

Ainsley Nies

Principal, Acorn Consulting Enterprises
As an independent consultant, Ainsley’s work is focused on the development of sustainable environments for learning and continuous improvement. She enjoys using a variety of approaches, including chartering, retrospectives, Open Space Technology, and World Café, to enable clients... Read More →


Saturday May 25, 2019 9:00am - 8:00pm
XP Open Jam 2019.

9:30am

The Principles of Disciplined Agile: Enabling Your Future WoW
This keynote works through the 7 foundational principles of the Disciplined Agile (DA) toolkit, explaining how they help to drive business agility.  We then work through the realities of transforming your organization, exploring the strategy of Guided Continuous Improvement (GCI).  We learn how the DA toolkit can help teams to choose and evolve their way of working (WoW) so that they have a process that is fit for purpose.  

When it comes to process improvement there are no silver bullets, there are no easy solutions -- it takes hard work and time, but at least GCI can help you to smooth your way.

Speakers
avatar for Scott Ambler

Scott Ambler

Senior Consulting Partner, Disciplined Agile, Inc.
Scott is a Senior Consulting Partner of Scott Ambler + Associates, working with organizations around the world to help them to improve their software processes. He provides training, coaching, and mentoring in disciplined agile and lean strategies at both the project and organizational... Read More →



Saturday May 25, 2019 9:30am - 10:30am
E-4024 (4th Floor)

10:30am

Break
Saturday May 25, 2019 10:30am - 11:00am
Salle Pas Perdus (Lobby)

11:00am

Educators Symposium Session II - Agile Training Methods
That's Not a Scrum! (30 mins)
Presented by: Carl Jones

Employability issues for Computer Science graduates has led to the inclusion of agile principles and practices as learning outcomes on degree programmes. The Scrum methodology framework is often used as a source of teaching material and/or experiences. This workshop will present an experience report from a Software Engineering degree programme that has an agile theme running across its years and will describe its use of Scrum as a teaching source. It will examine where the priorities of the programme and the constraints of Higher Education have compromised the alignment with the Scrum rules. This will lead into a discussion on the importance of alignment, the real goal in the teaching of agile and whether other frameworks may offer a better starting point.

If you’re planning to add agile to your curriculum, this workshop will highlight some areas to consider before committing to the use of Scrum, suggest areas for attention when planning to introduce agile or Scrum and alternative sources on which to start.



Learning in Complex Domains (Coding DevOps Dojos) (30 mins)
Presented by: Dion Stewart
Modern product development is complicated. Aside from the primary need of understanding the problem and value to the end user, there is a plethora of evolving technologies and processes people and teams can use to help them. But the urgency for delivery and mix of new things that could be learned makes learning quick and shallow.

With these competing needs and constraints - need to deliver, complex and changing environments, and need for deeper mastery of topics - how can teams learn and improve?

In this session we describe and discuss what we have learned about learning through Dojos. Dojos are immersive, whole team learning environments where whole teams come together to learn while they build under the direction of a coach. Different than agile practices and pilots, dojos focus on learning as a team, internalizing what is learned through teaching others, and experimentation.



The MERge - Management, Education and Research - Model in Teaching
Agility (30 mins)

Presented by: Orit Hazzan and Yael Dubinsky

In this Agile in Education and Training Session we present the MERge model, which maps Management, Education, and Research, as three meta-professions, as it is expressed in the ongoing professional work of agile practitioners. We illustrate the MERge model, and together with participants, we analyze its potential use in teaching and implementing Agility.




Speakers
avatar for Carl Jones

Carl Jones

Lecturer, Cardiff University
Worked for BT for 23 years as a developer, architect, agile coach, insert trendy label, etc. Now trying to pass on some of that to undergraduates at the National Software Academy, part of the School of Computer Science and Informatics at Cardiff University. Trying to teach agile... Read More →



Saturday May 25, 2019 11:00am - 12:30pm
E-2022 (2nd Floor)

11:00am

Adaptive Leadership... What is that? (Darren Hoevel, Bryan Miles)
Abstract:
“The single biggest failure of leadership is to treat adaptive challenges like technical problems.” -Ron Heifetz

We live and work in an increasingly interconnected and rapidly changing world. New business models are shifting duties to teams instead of individuals, which means people are now working more closely together. It also means leaders at all levels have to begin to adapt their leadership style to guide the intricacies of human dynamics and channel the collective knowledge of the groups they interact with.

In this workshop, we will explore how leaders create environments that navigate the complexity of interpersonal relationships, overcome the human element of barriers to change, and support the growth and engagement of their employees. Attendees will walk out of the room with a clearer idea of their own leadership style and a list of action items they can use (tomorrow!) to move their teams one step closer to higher performance.

Learning Outcomes:
Learners will leave:
  •  Knowing the difference between technical solutions and adaptive solutions.
  • Understanding where the most typical leadership interventions fall on the adaptive/technical map.
  •  With a clearer picture of their own leadership style and a list of action items they can use to move themselves more toward the adaptive realm.

Speakers
avatar for Darren Hoevel

Darren Hoevel

President, Agilist, Pliant Solutions
Darren Hoevel is a passionate Agile realist, organizational change advocate, corporate cultural renovator, customer ambassador and founder of Pliant Solutions. He is driven by transforming organizations into self-managing, self-organizing teams with high morale. Darren prides himself... Read More →
avatar for Bryan Miles

Bryan Miles

Coach, Pliant Solutions


Saturday May 25, 2019 11:00am - 12:30pm
E-4026

11:00am

Yle’s LeanCulture Toolkit: Turn your company into the benchmark of the new company culture (Mirette Kangas, Antti Kirjavainen)
Abstract:
The need for business agility is real.

In the face of digitalization and amidst risk of being disrupted by new products, companies, and business models, many companies and leaders have woken up to the need for change.

To develop genuine business agility and to help the company prosper, we need a new mindset for cultural change. It is all about people, it is part of everyday work, it is not a project. How to drive and accelerate this kind of cultural change to achieve business agility is a crucial question for leaders.

At Yle (Finnish Broadcasting Company), developing company culture is tangible and practical part of business development work for us. This way the change will become part and parcel of our structures and those structures will change naturally. Here, the change is based on voluntariness – it is the basis for growth and mutual learning. We are boldly applying a wide range of agile methods to how we manage and do things and adopting them in the manner that best suits our needs in creative and knowledge work. Culture changes through experimentation, even in leadership roles.

Based on our experience of over 30 workshops, during last 12 months, we have accumulated insight on how to drive culture change with a series of small experiments with feedback-loops. How to use customer feedback effectively with real-time and predictive data tools and practices. During co-operation with our Chief Technology Officer and Chief Digital Officer we have adapted and scaled agile practices also with board of directors.

At this workshop we will use Yle’s Lean Culture Toolkit (tiny.cc/yle-toolkit) and we will open a few tools we have applied, in collaboration with leaders, in Yle’s agile change journey. We will concentrate on tools that helps leaders and the whole organisation foster an agile company culture, while at the same time foster teams’ own agency and self-organization.

A shared positive and challenging vision of the future helps people join the culture change work and to commit to it with passion. We will demonstrate how to facilitate the discussion to find this vision through our culture mapping practice. The strength of this kind of vision setting is in that we do not limit ourselves to forming a vision about the results that we want to produce, but also discuss the behaviors needed to produce these kind of results and the structures needed to enable and amplify these behaviors.
In the second part of our workshop we will demonstrate our practices to kick off experiment-based continuous improvement towards the desired vision and how to keep this continuous change and learning going with the minimum amount of structure and routines.

Facilitator @mirettekangas and co-facilitator @anttiki


Learning Outcomes:
  • Getting ideas how to lead the business agility and cultural change by example.
  •  How you, as a leader, can create alignment on goals/vision/purpose as well as momentum and desire to change.
  • How to facilitate business units and teams to drive culture change with a series of small experiments with feedback-loops.


Speakers
avatar for Mirette Kangas

Mirette Kangas

Chief Lean-Agile Culture Officer, YLE
Mirette is the founder of Lean-Agile Culture Accelerator at Yle, Finnish Broadcasting Company. Lean Culture in Creative Work. Focusing now on growing the scope of the cultural transformation and spread the new approach to leadership across the organization. Previously leader of service... Read More →
avatar for Antti Kirjavainen

Antti Kirjavainen

Collaboration Gardener, Co-Founder, Flowa
Antti Kirjavainen, a co-founder of Flowa and a coach at Lean-Agile Culture Accelerator at Yle, is an entrepreneur and a coach helping digital businesses reach their potential through new methods of creative and knowledge work.



Saturday May 25, 2019 11:00am - 12:30pm
E-4024 (4th Floor)

11:00am

1st Int Workshop on Agile Transformation (Session II) (Torgeir Dingsøyr, Leonor Barroca)
Abstract:
Many organisations are adopting agile approaches, not only in their IT department, but increasingly across the whole organisation. The process of introducing agile practices in organisations is called an "agile transformation". In a review article published in 2016, Dikert et al. identify a number of challenges in agile transformations, such as resistance to change, lack of investment (training, coaching, lack of physical rearrangement to suit new ways of work), agile being "difficult to implement", challenges with coordination across teams, and that different approaches emerge in multi-team environments. The review focuses on software development organisations although many of the challenges identified are not necessarily specific to software development. As organisations increasingly engage in agile transformation processes, advice today is dominated by consultants and from experience reports. Researchers have suggested to understand agile transformation processes through sociotechnical theory, change management theory and we believe that there are a number of other fields to learn from to understand and improve the outcome of agile transformation processes.

We would like to challenge the scientific community to identify what should be of prime interest for researchers in this area, as there are growing opportunities to study agile transformation as companies increasingly adopt new large-scale agile frameworks. Organisations are learning from agile practice to embrace agility in their ways of working; agile practitioners can also benefit from the wider context of organisations undergoing agile transformations, to understand the wider implications of large-scale transformations and how to sustain them. We will create a workshop to provide an interactive arena for knowledge sharing and exchange of experiences between academics and practitioners.

Schedule:
11:00-Keynote - Tips for Successful Large-scale Agile Transformations Maria Paasivaara
11:30- Discussion: Main research challenges in agile transformations


Speakers
LB

Leonor Barroca

Senior lecturer, The Open University
avatar for Torgeir Dingsøyr

Torgeir Dingsøyr

chief scientist, SINTEF
Torgeir Dingsøyr has studied teamwork and learning in software development, as well as development methods for large software projects and programs. He is chief scientist at the SINTEF research foundation, which is recognized as one of the leading research environments in the world... Read More →


Saturday May 25, 2019 11:00am - 12:30pm
E-2024 (2nd Floor)

11:00am

A Grand Coding Challenge! Finding a New Largest Known Prime (Part II)
Abstract:
The quest to discover a new largest known prime has been ongoing for centuries. Those seeking to break the record for the largest known prime have pushed the bounds of computing. We have come a long way since the 1970s when the instructor, Landon Noll, as a high school student discovered a 6533-digit prime. Today’s largest known prime is almost 25 million digits long! Those seeking to break the record for the largest known prime have pushed the bounds of computing. The development of these extreme primality testing programs offers important lessons today for those who must write code which must work
correctly, even in the face of hardware errors, from the very first implementation.

To encourage the discovery of ever-larger primes, awards of $150000 and $250000 are offered to the first published proof of a discovery of a prime of at least 100 million and 1 billion digits respectively. The search for the largest known prime requires writing and running code that must run to completion, without any errors, throughout the entire proof of primality! A significant quality effort is required to write 100% error-free code. The calculations required to test extremely large numbers for primality must be fault resilient. One must overcome compiler and assembler errors, errors introduced by the kernel, and hardware errors such as memory errors and CPU calculation errors. The world record goes neither to the fastest coder nor to the person with the fastest hardware but rather to the first result that is proven to be correct. The reason for such extreme programming is that the length of the calculations exceeds the mean time to error of the calculating system. The motivation for such extreme care lies in the fact that a slow and correct answer is infinitely preferable to a fast but incorrect answer.

In this tutorial you will learn about the state of the art of searching for and proving the primality of very large numbers. How are these large primes discovered? What are some of the best ways to find a new world record-sized prime number? These and other prime questions will be explored. We will examine software and hardware-based approaches and will look at code fragments and hardware machine state diagrams.


Speakers

Saturday May 25, 2019 11:00am - 12:30pm
E-2025 (2nd Floor)

11:00am

Large Scale Agile Development (Part II) (Julian Bass)
Abstract:

Agile software development methods are conventionally applied in small, collocated development teams. There is growing interest, from researchers and practitioners, in agile methods applied to large-scale projects with several cooperating teams developing complex systems.
Large-scale agile is now a hot topic in software engineering. Agile frameworks, with all their benefits and challenges are being widely discussed and applied. The IEEE Software special issue on large-scale agile put together by Torgeir Dingsøyr, Davide Falessi and Ken Power is expected to come out in Mar./Apr. 2019.
How to apply agile methods to large projects was identified as the "top burning research question" by practitioners at XP2010. At XP2013 to XP2018, this workshop has addressed research challenges in large-scale agile development and identified topics such as inter-team coordination, large project organization, release planning and architecture and practices to scaling agile methods

Schedule:
11:00 – Research Paper 4: Changes Over Time in a Planned Inter-Team Coordination Routine Tomas Gustavsson
11:15 – Research Paper 5: Technical-, Social- and Process Debt in Large-Scale Agile: an exploratory case-study Antonio Martini, Viktoria Stray and Nils Brede Moe
11:30 – Research Trends/Priorities Interactive Discussion Session


Speakers
avatar for Viktoria Stray

Viktoria Stray

Associate Professor, Department of Informatics, University of Oslo
Associate Professor in Software Engineering (University of Oslo), Research Scientist (SINTEF Digital). MSc in Computer Science (Norwegian University of Science and Technology and University of California, Santa Barbara), PhD (University of Oslo and University of New South Wales... Read More →
avatar for Nils Brede Moe

Nils Brede Moe

Research Manager, SINTEF
I work with software process improvement, agile software develop- ment and global software development as a senior scientist at SINTEF Digital. My research interests are related to organizational, socio-technical, and global/distributed aspects. I wrote my thesis for the degree of... Read More →
avatar for Julian Bass

Julian Bass

Senior Lecturer, University of Salford
I have developed an inventory of activities and behaviours for product owners in large-scale agile development programmes. Check out the articles on large-scale agile in the Mar./Apr. 2019 issue of IEEE Software.



Saturday May 25, 2019 11:00am - 12:30pm
E-4025 (4th Floor)

11:00am

Sensemaking in organizations (Part II): How to create a practical Cynefin and sensemaking process (Ken Power, Tony Quinlan)
Abstract:
The Cynefin sensemaking framework has grown in popularity in the agile community in recent years. Used to its full potential, sensemaking and the Cynefin framework are powerful and effective approaches to informing action in complex, dynamic, and uncertain situations. Ken and Tony will introduce a practical, effective approach based on their work applying complexity techniques in large global technology organisations. This workshop, based on years of experience with dozens of sensemaking projects, will teach you the fundamentals of using micronarrative-based sensemaking and the Cynefin framework to foster transformation, resilience and agility.

This session will focus on use of sensemkaing to support transformations. You will learn about sensemaking in organizaitons, the Cynefin framework, how to determine appropriate action in a given context, how to design experiments for navigating complex situations, how to tailor a sensemaking framework for a particular purpose, and how to integrate sensemaking into your organizaiton.

Learning Outcomes:
Learning outcomes from this workshop include:
  • An understanding of the Cynefin framework, or a refresher for those who have already come across it
  •  Understanding of sensemaking and where it is useful and appropriate in organisations
  •  Tips for designing a sensemaking framework
  • Feedback and action process - elements of cadence and timing - how often do we have action-focused workshops
  •  How to integrate sensemaking into the cadence of the organization
  • Ensuring different parts of the organisation are represented in the sensemaking and experiment design
  • Getting people to pay attention to the results and take action informed by those results


Speakers
avatar for Ken Power

Ken Power

Software Engineering Leader, https://kenpower.dev/
Ken Power has held multiple positions in large technology organizations. His current responsibilities include leading global, large-scale engineering organization transformations. He has been working with agile and lean methods since 1999. He holds patents in virtualization and network... Read More →
avatar for Tony Quinlan

Tony Quinlan

CEO & Chief Storyteller, Narrate
Complexity, Cynefin and sense-making. Understanding the cultural landscape and making enough sense to take action. Running workshops for organisations to co-create interventions and strategies for transformation. Using SenseMaker to measure the impact of change programmes.


Saturday May 25, 2019 11:00am - 12:30pm
E-2023 (2nd Floor)

12:30pm

Lunch
Saturday May 25, 2019 12:30pm - 1:30pm
Salle Pas Perdus (Lobby)

1:30pm

Educators Symposium Session III - Agile Beyond Code
FLeX your Agile teaching muscles! A journey to Facilitation and Learning to the eXtreme (using FleX techniques) (30 mins)
Presented by: Michael Delis and Bruno Bouchard
Participants attending this session will be taken on an experiential journey of learning innovative approaches to address common challenges in the teaching and facilitation of Agile concepts and practices by uniquely combining extreme training (XTr) techniques from athletic and sports domains along with established extreme programming (XP) practices, and leveraging an existing extreme teaching (XT) framework.

Session facilitators Delis and Bouchard will collaboratively ask attending participants for their experienced challenges in teaching and facilitating Agile concepts and practices that will interactively be referenced by the facilitators with their own experiences in over 30 years of combined education and training in academic, industry, and certification environments.

The presentation will then focus on the top 5 identified challenges, as interactively prioritized by audience participants, followed by the facilitators introducing FLeX (Facilitation and Learning to the eXtreme) techniques and providing specific examples to target and address each challenge.
Participants will take away a unique perspective on how to adapt their teaching techniques by applying FLeX techniques. If Learning and Facilitation is good… do it to the eXtreme by using FLeX techniques!


Multiple Intelligence in an Agile Environment (30 mins)
Presented by: Stuart Oakley

Agile teams are always working to discover how they can work best together. By exploring Dr. Howard Gardner's Theory of Multiple Intelligence, we can discover new ways of understanding our teams. With this understanding, we can better adjust how we work to improve teams. Dr. Gardner is a Developmental Psychologist at Harvard University. As part of his book "Frames of Mind: The Theory of Multiple Intelligences," published in 1983, he determined that people have different ways of processing information. As a result, Gardner identified 8 basic intelligences that each of us have a varying levels. In being aware of these intelligences and how we process information, we can expand Multiple Intelligence to support how we work with teams and the people on those teams.

We will be exploring what these intelligences are, how might we leverage them in an Agile team, and run through a simple MI assessment to help determine dominant intelligences.


Pyramid of Humble Mastery - A Toolkit to Mastery in Agility, DevOps and What not? (30 mins)
Presented by: Vivek Ganesan and Kiran Kashyap

Have you ever wondered about the mechanics of how human beings learn? Does your job involve teaching something to others? Or, do you want to teach a new skill to your child at home? If you are looking to add another tool to your teaching toolkit, particularly if you are an Agile Trainer, then the Pyramid of Humble Mastery is for you.

In this interactive workshop, we introduce the Pyramid of Humble Mastery, a model that we have used to teach concepts like Agility, DevOps, etc to audiences of various maturity. This workshop will take a conversational tone filled with hands-on activities and ample time for answering questions from the audience. The audience will leave this workshop with hands-on experience of how to teach any new field meaningfully using this model.

Speakers
avatar for Michael Delis

Michael Delis

Executive VP / Director of Training and Methodology, PMC - Project Management Centre
I am an Executive VP and Director of Training & Methodologies at the Project Management Centre (PMC), author/instructor of the Agile Project Management program at McGill University, Coordinator of the Certification and Education Program at the PMI-Montreal chapter, and active member... Read More →
avatar for Bruno Bouchard

Bruno Bouchard

Agile Coach, PMC
avatar for Vivek Ganesan

Vivek Ganesan

Agile/DevOps Coach, Ampyard Private Limited
avatar for Kiran Kashyap

Kiran Kashyap

A Proud Agile Practitioner
avatar for Stuart Oakley

Stuart Oakley

Agile Coach
I started my Agile journey more than 10 years ago. Now an Agile Coach that brings conversations and relationships to the teams I work with. I am new to the conference circuit, but looking to grow. I am a strong advocate of bringing Agile to Education. I believe that Agile can... Read More →



Saturday May 25, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm
E-2022 (2nd Floor)

1:30pm

DevOps: Left-Shifting Management Practices (Ruth Lennon, Lynn Robert Carter)
Abstract:
DevOps is a cultural change for team members. However it is often forgotten that management concepts throughout the Software Development Life Cycle (SDLC) must also change. Organization level adoption of DevOps is required in order to support the process of culture change. Processes required to support DevOps should be divided into Organisational and Individual responsibilities. Whilst the scope of responsibility and level of management support will vary depending on the maturity of adoption of the DevOps process there are many structures which can be put into place to support the DevOps transition.

In this talk use cases are presented to illustrate best practice for management of the DevOps process. In addition management processes are described with particular reference to how they change as a result of DevOps. Finally, the talk will outline the impact standards on the management process including that of the upcoming IEEE P2675 Standard.

Learning Outcomes:
The aims of this talk are:
  •  To focus the understanding of all members of the organisation as to the key role of management in supporting DevOps
  • To discuss organizational change and to increase management buy-in to DevOps.
  • To present best practice for the support of DevOps from a management perspective


Speakers
avatar for Nithyanandam "Mathi" Mathiyazhagan

Nithyanandam "Mathi" Mathiyazhagan

Lead Program Manager, Strategic Initiatives, John Hancock (ManuLife)
⬥ Program Lead with extensive experience in Business, Technology, and Knowledge Management. ⬥ Developed strategic solutions for operationalizing organizational product and Agile/DevOps strategies into programs/projects for creating business value. ⬥ Skilled at developing and... Read More →
avatar for Ruth Lennon

Ruth Lennon

Letterkenny Institute of Technology



Saturday May 25, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm
E-4024 (4th Floor)

1:30pm

Lemonade, Pop Tarts and Poutine: Six chapters of our agile organizational transformations! (Amir Pourteymour, Philippe Sauve)

Abstract:
Have you heard about When life gives you lemons, make some lemonade? Call it transformational challenges, difficulties, or even adversities; we encountered many types of lemons as part of our organizational transformation from when we were a small company to when we were part of one of the largest enterprises in the World! Trust me, each time, we sliced those tough lemons and made them the sweetest, and of course, the most memorable lemonade or rather, the most exciting professional journey of my life.
Interested to hear more?
As a person who went through at least a handful of mergers and acquisitions and organizational transformation in our company, I gained firsthand experience and insight into some of the difficulties that companies face as part of their transformation.
As part of this talk, I would like to humbly share our unpublished detailed experience representing our novel leadership stance with examples of our challenges, observations, and reflections. Our goal is to share, exchange and inspire you by inviting you to take on this exciting roller-coaster journey of enabling operational excellence and improving employee development, satisfaction and retention over the last seven years.
We would like to present the six chapters of our organizational transformation to share with you our firsthand experience of the collaboration with our leadership team, Finance, and HR to crawl, walk and finally run.
Here are the chapters:
1. Growing Pains! Sorting our ducks in the row!
This chapter is about when we were a small company and required some clarity into what we were doing and defined some processes as well as roles and responsibilities. How did we support our leadership and management in one of the most important pain points of our integration?
2. Welcome to the jungle!
How did we bridge the gap with cross-functional organizations such as Finance and HR using our Agile mindset? This chapter is about being acquired and facing the challenges of the integration of culture, process, and people. This chapter is about putting tiles for our people to navigate in the new mothership jungle.
3. Back to the core!
This chapter is about how we got rid of some cookie-cutting processes that we implemented ourselves(!) and established our very own customized process while accomplishing it collaboratively.
4. Mastery!
Chapter 2 was about creating a navigation path in the mothership process. Chapter 4 is about transforming to the next level. How did our transparency and Agile mindset not only to influence finance and leadership but also influence how we were able to enable our business leaders?
5. Enabler!
This chapter is about how we transformed into a SWAT team as part of our ongoing organizational transformation. Bridging not only teams and departments but also organizations to create a novel innovation stance.
6. Wild Card!
What are we baking for the next chapter as we present?

Learning Outcomes:
  • If you are a leader, manager, finance/HR expert, agile coach, or anyone interested in supporting operational excellence, you will learn a lot from our firsthand experience. We present our topic in a way that you will leave the sessions with the following inspirational takeaways:
  •  What was the most critical learning of these seven years? How did we leverage our Agile mindset and toolbox to help us navigate, embrace and succeed in our transformational challenges?
  •  How did we deliver value incrementally and experimentally throughout the organizational transformation?
  •  What was the role of diversity and inclusivity in our team? How did our DNA enable each person to bring a different and valuable perspective to the table? How did we embrace different working cultures and locations? How did we innovate?
  •  How did we stay focused and prevented endless philosophical discussions?
  •  How did we intentionally and carefully create and define our own culture in our team? How did we remain open, transparent with a high level of energy? What was the value and impact of such culture as part of this transformation? How did we embrace our differences and conflicts?
  • How did we establish an objective, trusted position in our organization, not only from the perspective of our leadership but also from the standpoint of our agile development teams?
  •  How did we stay as a servant-leader and remain selfless in our organization?
  • What was the value of having a big picture throughout this journey?


Speakers
avatar for Amir Pourteymour

Amir Pourteymour

Head of Operations - SAP Commerce Cloud, SAP
avatar for Philippe Sauve

Philippe Sauve

Operations, Agile Coach/Trainer, SAP Labs Canada


Saturday May 25, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm
E-4026

1:30pm

A-teams’19, 2nd Int Workshop on Autonomous Agile Teams (Part I) (Viktoria Stray, Nils Brede Moe)
  • 13:30 - Welcome - program and motivation - Nils Brede Moe and Viktoria Stray (organisers, no abstract)
  • Keynote : What makes your team self-organizing? Rashina Hoda
  • Spotify Tailoring for Promoting Effectiveness in Cross-Functional Autonomous Squads Julian Bass
  • The Influence of Culture and Structure on Autonomous Teams in Established Companies Simone Spiegler
  • Voices From the Teams - Impacts on Autonomy in Large-Scale Agile Software Development Settings Tomas Gustavsson
Abstract:
To succeed in complex environments like large-scale and heterogeneous teams handling innovation development and support, organizations have to find ways to support and regulate teams' autonomy according to the environmental demands and limitations. However, autonomous teams cannot be created simply by tearing down organizational hierarchies, or by instituting one-person-one-vote decision-making processes. Challenges implementing autonomous teams are communication problems, social loafing and group thinking. Further, the agile team is becoming more diverse with the introduction of DevOps and BizDevOps. While heterogenous agile teams create solutions with the highest value, the lowest value is also produced by such teams. Additionally, in large-scale there is a conflict between the need for alignment and team autonomy. Furthermore, they have to take into consideration the degree of change and uncertainty, and that there is no one-size-fits-all autonomy approach. The process of forming and implementing agile teams with high autonomy, as well as the effective functioning of such teams, are not yet adequately addressed and understood in the context of software development organizations.

Thus, there is a need for new knowledge on how organizations shall organize for the right level of team autonomy, and utilize autonomous agile teams, in order to attain better performance, productivity, innovation and value creation, and thus increase competitiveness. We seek to facilitate knowledge sharing about the current practice of autonomous software teams in agile development and also deepen the knowledge of principles of how these teams can succeed. We seek contributions in the form of position papers with experience reports, empirical studies, reviews of relevant literature, and papers arguing for research needs or describing planned research.

The goal of the workshop is to facilitate knowledge sharing about the current practice of autonomous agile teams and deepen the knowledge about practices and strategies that enable autonomous teams. There will be an invited keynote, short talks (lightning talks) followed by a highly interactive session using workshop techniques.

We invite researchers and practitioners to this second international workshop to discuss how to succeed with teamwork in agile projects. One emerging question is “How can organizations give cross-functional agile teams the authority to set directions for new products so that organizations can deliver software more rapidly"?


Speakers
avatar for Tomas Gustavsson

Tomas Gustavsson

PhD Student, Karlstads universitet
Started out as an IT consultant in 1996 and have since worked as project manager, lecturer, author, publisher and CEO but decided to wholeheartedly work within academia and began as PhD student in the fall semester of 2016. I focus on large-scale agile development, specificially within... Read More →
avatar for Simone V. Spiegler

Simone V. Spiegler

PhD Student, University of Stuttgart & Robert Bosch Automotive Steering Gmbh
Agile Coach and researcher on the lateral leadership role of a Scrum Master in established companies. My background in Social Psychology, Organizational Studies and Software Technology help me to integrate divers perspectives on the Scrum Master role.So far, I have worked for 3 different... Read More →
avatar for Rashina Hoda

Rashina Hoda

Senior Lecturer, University of Auckland
I study human aspects of software engineering, agile software development and project management, and serious games design for the 21st century classrooms. More info at www.rashina.com
avatar for Viktoria Stray

Viktoria Stray

Associate Professor, Department of Informatics, University of Oslo
Associate Professor in Software Engineering (University of Oslo), Research Scientist (SINTEF Digital). MSc in Computer Science (Norwegian University of Science and Technology and University of California, Santa Barbara), PhD (University of Oslo and University of New South Wales... Read More →
avatar for Nils Brede Moe

Nils Brede Moe

Research Manager, SINTEF
I work with software process improvement, agile software develop- ment and global software development as a senior scientist at SINTEF Digital. My research interests are related to organizational, socio-technical, and global/distributed aspects. I wrote my thesis for the degree of... Read More →
avatar for Julian Bass

Julian Bass

Senior Lecturer, University of Salford
I have developed an inventory of activities and behaviours for product owners in large-scale agile development programmes. Check out the articles on large-scale agile in the Mar./Apr. 2019 issue of IEEE Software.



Saturday May 25, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm
E-2024 (2nd Floor)

1:30pm

Domain-Driven Design with User Story Mapping (Part I) (Dion Stewart)
Abstract:

In his book User Story Mapping: Discover the Whole Story, Build the Right Product, Jeff Patton explains how to write better stories by creating story maps. Story maps foster better collaboration within and across teams, leading to shared understanding about the product.

Dion Stewart learned story mapping from Jeff Patton and David Hussman six years ago. After using story mapping on a product as a developer, he was hooked. As a coach, Dion has taught story mapping to dozens of organizations. Along the way, story mapping has evolved.

Dion explores how teams are using annotated journeys with story maps to drive modeling discussions around testing, ensuring outcomes and key results can be met, and how annotated journeys have most recently been used in applying domain driven design.

Topics include:
• Story mapping basics
• User journeys
• Annotations for testing
• Ensuring outcomes/key results
• Using user journeys to drive collaboration around DDD concepts (ubiquitous language, defining the domain, evolving the model, and establishing context)
• Defining bounded contexts
• Identifying core and extended data attributes
• Understanding the rate at which data changes over time

Learning Outcomes:
  • How to link application architecture to user experience design
  • Story Mapping (basics and newer, advanced concepts)
  • Domain-Driven Design Concepts (Bounded Contexts, Aggregates, Entities, Domain Events, Commands)
  • Collaboration Techniques
  • How to Build Shared Understanding
  • Cloud/Distributed Systems Architecture


Speakers

Saturday May 25, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm
E-4025 (4th Floor)

1:30pm

Sensemaking in organizations (Part III): How to create a practical Cynefin and sensemaking process (Ken Power, Tony Quinlan)
Abstract:
The Cynefin sensemaking framework has grown in popularity in the agile community in recent years. Used to its full potential, sensemaking and the Cynefin framework are powerful and effective approaches to informing action in complex, dynamic, and uncertain situations. Ken and Tony will introduce a practical, effective approach based on their work applying complexity techniques in large global technology organisations. This workshop, based on years of experience with dozens of sensemaking projects, will teach you the fundamentals of using micronarrative-based sensemaking and the Cynefin framework to foster transformation, resilience and agility.

This session will focus on use of sensemkaing to support transformations. You will learn about sensemaking in organizaitons, the Cynefin framework, how to determine appropriate action in a given context, how to design experiments for navigating complex situations, how to tailor a sensemaking framework for a particular purpose, and how to integrate sensemaking into your organizaiton.

Learning Outcomes:
Learning outcomes from this workshop include:
  • An understanding of the Cynefin framework, or a refresher for those who have already come across it
  •  Understanding of sensemaking and where it is useful and appropriate in organisations
  •  Tips for designing a sensemaking framework
  • Feedback and action process - elements of cadence and timing - how often do we have action-focused workshops
  •  How to integrate sensemaking into the cadence of the organization
  • Ensuring different parts of the organisation are represented in the sensemaking and experiment design
  • Getting people to pay attention to the results and take action informed by those results


Speakers
avatar for Ken Power

Ken Power

Software Engineering Leader, https://kenpower.dev/
Ken Power has held multiple positions in large technology organizations. His current responsibilities include leading global, large-scale engineering organization transformations. He has been working with agile and lean methods since 1999. He holds patents in virtualization and network... Read More →
avatar for Tony Quinlan

Tony Quinlan

CEO & Chief Storyteller, Narrate
Complexity, Cynefin and sense-making. Understanding the cultural landscape and making enough sense to take action. Running workshops for organisations to co-create interventions and strategies for transformation. Using SenseMaker to measure the impact of change programmes.


Saturday May 25, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm
E-2023 (2nd Floor)

1:30pm

Threat Modelling (Part I) - Build security into your project from the ground up. (Kelsey Haaster, Robin Doherty)
Abstract:
When a group of stakeholders and team members come together to plan a new product or feature, they often focus on identifying stories that deliver end user value through solving a business problem, delighting the customer or disrupting a competitor. While these are critical stories, they are not the whole picture.

Every product has non-functional or cross-functional stories which must be played.
Security stories are an important part of these but are often not considered at all. When they are considered, they are often an afterthought or are assumed to be part of the project infrastructure. Trying to bolt on security as an afterthought in this way is a mistake that can lead to disaster at one extreme, and compromises to reduce product usability, or don't support good end-user security practices at the other.
The challenge, of course, is that from the stakeholder perspective, security is not seen as a priority. This workshop is for software delivery teams who want to learn how to change this perspective and work with their stakeholders to help them to understand more about the importance of security. The goal is to help technical and non-technical stakeholders understand security and why it should be given priority and built into their product from the ground up. We show participants how to facilitate a structured meeting or workshop with their stakeholders where they use a simplified threat modelling technique to identify risks.

The outcome is the identification of user stories (or evil user stories) which when played will mitigate identified risks.

Learning Outcomes:
  • How to facilitate a threat modelling workshop.
  • How to identify the most important security risks, especially the not-so-obvious ones.
  • How to identify mitigations for security risks and turn them into playable user stories.


Speakers
avatar for Robin Doherty

Robin Doherty

Security Lead, ThoughtWorks


Saturday May 25, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm
E-2025 (2nd Floor)

3:00pm

Break
Saturday May 25, 2019 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Salle Pas Perdus (Lobby)

3:30pm

Educators Symposium Session IV - Keynote & Wrap up
Experience from an Agile Project Course: Seeking to improve learning outcome




Speakers
avatar for Torgeir Dingsøyr

Torgeir Dingsøyr

chief scientist, SINTEF
Torgeir Dingsøyr has studied teamwork and learning in software development, as well as development methods for large software projects and programs. He is chief scientist at the SINTEF research foundation, which is recognized as one of the leading research environments in the world... Read More →


Saturday May 25, 2019 3:30pm - 5:00pm
E-2022 (2nd Floor)

3:30pm

Once upon a time (before agile) there was a manager ..... (Deepti Jain)
Abstract:
Once upon a time, when Agile was still finding it’s feet and Traditional Management with waterfall was norm, there was a Manager for every team. Everybody wanted to be managers because they had power and were paid better. There were two ways to this role – 1) Be really good with your work -which means you be the best engineer, or 2) Be really a smart executor and get things done. Either case wasn’t a fair scenario. If a good engineer became manager, he hated his new job because he really wanted to be an engineer and didn’t like dealing with people. And if a smart executor got to be Manager, he struggled to command respect of his team as he struggled with technical knowledge and team’s questions. Corporate politics, Bell Curve and evil competition become part of DNA and hence with ask of performance, the designed path was set to create failures, frustrations and politics.

As a response to this and much more, Agile Revolution happened and and POOF! The managers were gone!
  • So what happened to Managers?
  • Will there be no such role in future?
  • BIGGER Question - Is it really that bad to be a Manager?
  • What happens to all the Organisational knowledge as well as art of execution that these managers learnt over generations?
  • Can Organisations really be functional, be on track without Managers?
  • Is industry ready to let go of all the knowledge that Managers have gathered generations of people management and corporate dynamics?

This workshop intends to explore the same. During this hands-on workshop, we will understand the role that’s needed for Agile Organisations and how Agile Managers, or whatever name we want to give to this new needed role, will offer to our previous role- Manager. In this workshop we will explore the characteristics of traditional Managers, and design a new role based on the need of an Agile Organisation. And for doing that we will first discover the need of an Agile Organisation. So in this 1 hour action pack workshop, we will be able to create a case for existing role of Manager and how it can be best utilised for an Agile Organisation.

Learning Outcomes:
  • With this mini-workshop you will be able to take away following-
  •  Value that our tradition system derived from Managers, and how that need changed as Agile changed the way we work and look at things now.
  •  How this value that has been learnt and earned over decades of traditional Management, can utilised by Agile organisations, without killing the Agile Spirit of self-Management and cross-fictional teams.
  •  What are the missing roles and responsibilities, which are still not defined for an Organisations that's moving from traditional to Agile ways of working, and how they can be defined and fulfilled.


Speakers
avatar for Deepti Jain

Deepti Jain

Agile Transformation Strategist, AgileVirgin
Deepti is an Agile practitioner, experienced in creating, leading, and managing an Agile team in a distributed setup. She is active in Agile community building in India via her initiatives and events. For the past 6 years, her primary focus is on Agile and its Scaling with Continuous... Read More →


Saturday May 25, 2019 3:30pm - 5:00pm
E-4024 (4th Floor)

3:30pm

A-teams’19, 2nd Int Workshop on Autonomous Agile Teams (Part II) (Viktoria Stray, Nils Brede Moe)
  • Exploring the challenges of integrating data science roles in agile autonomous teams Ivar Hukkelberg
  • Agile autonomous teams in complex organizations Marius Mikalsen
  • Earn Your Wings: A Novel Approach to Deployment Governance Yvan Petit
  • Autonomous agile teams: Future directions for research Nils Brede Moe and Viktoria Stray
  • 16:50 - 17:00 Closing Nils Brede Moe and Viktoria Stray

Abstract:
To succeed in complex environments like large-scale and heterogeneous teams handling innovation development and support, organizations have to find ways to support and regulate teams' autonomy according to the environmental demands and limitations. However, autonomous teams cannot be created simply by tearing down organizational hierarchies, or by instituting one-person-one-vote decision-making processes. Challenges implementing autonomous teams are communication problems, social loafing and group thinking. Further, the agile team is becoming more diverse with the introduction of DevOps and BizDevOps. While heterogenous agile teams create solutions with the highest value, the lowest value is also produced by such teams. Additionally, in large-scale there is a conflict between the need for alignment and team autonomy. Furthermore, they have to take into consideration the degree of change and uncertainty, and that there is no one-size-fits-all autonomy approach. The process of forming and implementing agile teams with high autonomy, as well as the effective functioning of such teams, are not yet adequately addressed and understood in the context of software development organizations.

Thus, there is a need for new knowledge on how organizations shall organize for the right level of team autonomy, and utilize autonomous agile teams, in order to attain better performance, productivity, innovation and value creation, and thus increase competitiveness. We seek to facilitate knowledge sharing about the current practice of autonomous software teams in agile development and also deepen the knowledge of principles of how these teams can succeed. We seek contributions in the form of position papers with experience reports, empirical studies, reviews of relevant literature, and papers arguing for research needs or describing planned research.

The goal of the workshop is to facilitate knowledge sharing about the current practice of autonomous agile teams and deepen the knowledge about practices and strategies that enable autonomous teams. There will be an invited keynote, short talks (lightning talks) followed by a highly interactive session using workshop techniques.

We invite researchers and practitioners to this second international workshop to discuss how to succeed with teamwork in agile projects. One emerging question is “How can organizations give cross-functional agile teams the authority to set directions for new products so that organizations can deliver software more rapidly"?


Speakers
avatar for Nils Brede Moe

Nils Brede Moe

Research Manager, SINTEF
I work with software process improvement, agile software develop- ment and global software development as a senior scientist at SINTEF Digital. My research interests are related to organizational, socio-technical, and global/distributed aspects. I wrote my thesis for the degree of... Read More →
avatar for Viktoria Stray

Viktoria Stray

Associate Professor, Department of Informatics, University of Oslo
Associate Professor in Software Engineering (University of Oslo), Research Scientist (SINTEF Digital). MSc in Computer Science (Norwegian University of Science and Technology and University of California, Santa Barbara), PhD (University of Oslo and University of New South Wales... Read More →


Saturday May 25, 2019 3:30pm - 5:00pm
E-2024 (2nd Floor)

3:30pm

Domain-Driven Design with User Story Mapping (Part II) (Dion Stewart)
Abstract:

In his book User Story Mapping: Discover the Whole Story, Build the Right Product, Jeff Patton explains how to write better stories by creating story maps. Story maps foster better collaboration within and across teams, leading to shared understanding about the product.

Dion Stewart learned story mapping from Jeff Patton and David Hussman six years ago. After using story mapping on a product as a developer, he was hooked. As a coach, Dion has taught story mapping to dozens of organizations. Along the way, story mapping has evolved.

Dion explores how teams are using annotated journeys with story maps to drive modeling discussions around testing, ensuring outcomes and key results can be met, and how annotated journeys have most recently been used in applying domain driven design.

Topics include:
• Story mapping basics
• User journeys
• Annotations for testing
• Ensuring outcomes/key results
• Using user journeys to drive collaboration around DDD concepts (ubiquitous language, defining the domain, evolving the model, and establishing context)
• Defining bounded contexts
• Identifying core and extended data attributes
• Understanding the rate at which data changes over time

Learning Outcomes:
  • How to link application architecture to user experience design
  • Story Mapping (basics and newer, advanced concepts)
  • Domain-Driven Design Concepts (Bounded Contexts, Aggregates, Entities, Domain Events, Commands)
  • Collaboration Techniques
  • How to Build Shared Understanding
  • Cloud/Distributed Systems Architecture


Speakers

Saturday May 25, 2019 3:30pm - 5:00pm
E-4025 (4th Floor)

3:30pm

Sensemaking in organizations (Part IV): How to create a practical Cynefin and sensemaking process (Ken Power, Tony Quinlan)
Abstract:
The Cynefin sensemaking framework has grown in popularity in the agile community in recent years. Used to its full potential, sensemaking and the Cynefin framework are powerful and effective approaches to informing action in complex, dynamic, and uncertain situations. Ken and Tony will introduce a practical, effective approach based on their work applying complexity techniques in large global technology organisations. This workshop, based on years of experience with dozens of sensemaking projects, will teach you the fundamentals of using micronarrative-based sensemaking and the Cynefin framework to foster transformation, resilience and agility.

This session will focus on use of sensemkaing to support transformations. You will learn about sensemaking in organizaitons, the Cynefin framework, how to determine appropriate action in a given context, how to design experiments for navigating complex situations, how to tailor a sensemaking framework for a particular purpose, and how to integrate sensemaking into your organizaiton.

Learning Outcomes:
Learning outcomes from this workshop include:
  • An understanding of the Cynefin framework, or a refresher for those who have already come across it
  •  Understanding of sensemaking and where it is useful and appropriate in organisations
  •  Tips for designing a sensemaking framework
  • Feedback and action process - elements of cadence and timing - how often do we have action-focused workshops
  •  How to integrate sensemaking into the cadence of the organization
  • Ensuring different parts of the organisation are represented in the sensemaking and experiment design
  • Getting people to pay attention to the results and take action informed by those results


Speakers
avatar for Ken Power

Ken Power

Software Engineering Leader, https://kenpower.dev/
Ken Power has held multiple positions in large technology organizations. His current responsibilities include leading global, large-scale engineering organization transformations. He has been working with agile and lean methods since 1999. He holds patents in virtualization and network... Read More →
avatar for Tony Quinlan

Tony Quinlan

CEO & Chief Storyteller, Narrate
Complexity, Cynefin and sense-making. Understanding the cultural landscape and making enough sense to take action. Running workshops for organisations to co-create interventions and strategies for transformation. Using SenseMaker to measure the impact of change programmes.


Saturday May 25, 2019 3:30pm - 5:00pm
E-2023 (2nd Floor)

3:30pm

Threat Modelling (Part II) - Build security into your project from the ground up. (Kelsey Haaster, Robin Doherty)
Abstract:
When a group of stakeholders and team members come together to plan a new product or feature, they often focus on identifying stories that deliver end user value through solving a business problem, delighting the customer or disrupting a competitor. While these are critical stories, they are not the whole picture.

Every product has non-functional or cross-functional stories which must be played.
Security stories are an important part of these but are often not considered at all. When they are considered, they are often an afterthought or are assumed to be part of the project infrastructure. Trying to bolt on security as an afterthought in this way is a mistake that can lead to disaster at one extreme, and compromises to reduce product usability, or don't support good end-user security practices at the other.
The challenge, of course, is that from the stakeholder perspective, security is not seen as a priority. This workshop is for software delivery teams who want to learn how to change this perspective and work with their stakeholders to help them to understand more about the importance of security. The goal is to help technical and non-technical stakeholders understand security and why it should be given priority and built into their product from the ground up. We show participants how to facilitate a structured meeting or workshop with their stakeholders where they use a simplified threat modelling technique to identify risks.

The outcome is the identification of user stories (or evil user stories) which when played will mitigate identified risks.

Learning Outcomes:
  • How to facilitate a threat modelling workshop.
  • How to identify the most important security risks, especially the not-so-obvious ones.
  • How to identify mitigations for security risks and turn them into playable user stories.


Speakers
avatar for Robin Doherty

Robin Doherty

Security Lead, ThoughtWorks


Saturday May 25, 2019 3:30pm - 5:00pm
E-2025 (2nd Floor)

5:00pm

Break
Saturday May 25, 2019 5:00pm - 5:15pm
Salle Pas Perdus (Lobby)

5:15pm

Closing Plenary: Panel - Agile the Next 20 Years
The this panel will discuss the theme of this year's XP2019 - "Agile - the Next 20 Years: Share and Discover!" Panelists will include practitioners and researchers who have participated in both the XP and ICSE series of software engineering conferences and perspectives will likely range from "The End of Agile" to "What's Next?" Join us for what we hope will be a fitting discussion to launch us into the closing reception of XP2019 - and prepare us for IEEE's ICSE'19 (Montréal) and XP2020 in Copenhagen.

Participation in the Closing Plenary/Reception is included for XP attendees whose registration includes Saturday, May 25th and registrants to ICGSE (Int Conf Global Software Engineering). Other ICSE attendees may attend subject to a walk-in fee ($15 USD) to cover the cost of nibbles and sparkling water. A cash bar will also be available.

Speakers
avatar for Steven Fraser

Steven Fraser

Impresario & Principal Consultant, Innoxec (Innovation Executive Services)
Steven Fraser is based in Silicon Valley and has served as an innovation catalyst with global influence for HP, Cisco, Qualcomm, and Nortel. In addition to a year as a Visiting Scientist at Carnegie Mellon University’s Software Engineering Institute (SEI) consulting on domain engineering... Read More →
avatar for Deepti Jain

Deepti Jain

Agile Transformation Strategist, AgileVirgin
Deepti is an Agile practitioner, experienced in creating, leading, and managing an Agile team in a distributed setup. She is active in Agile community building in India via her initiatives and events. For the past 6 years, her primary focus is on Agile and its Scaling with Continuous... Read More →
avatar for Philippe Kruchten

Philippe Kruchten

Professor, UBC
Philippe Kruchten is a professor of software engineering at the University of British Columbia, in Vancouver, Canada. His current research interests include software architecture and software evolution, in particular the phenomenon called “technical debt”, as well as software... Read More →
avatar for Nils Brede Moe

Nils Brede Moe

Research Manager, SINTEF
I work with software process improvement, agile software develop- ment and global software development as a senior scientist at SINTEF Digital. My research interests are related to organizational, socio-technical, and global/distributed aspects. I wrote my thesis for the degree of... Read More →
avatar for Ken Power

Ken Power

Software Engineering Leader, https://kenpower.dev/
Ken Power has held multiple positions in large technology organizations. His current responsibilities include leading global, large-scale engineering organization transformations. He has been working with agile and lean methods since 1999. He holds patents in virtualization and network... Read More →
avatar for Helen Sharp

Helen Sharp

Professor, The Open University
My research investigates professional software practice with a focus on human and social aspects of software development. I am currently focusing on agile transformations, secure coding and agile user experience. I am joint author of one of the leading HCI textbooks, Interaction Design... Read More →


Saturday May 25, 2019 5:15pm - 6:15pm
Auditorium /Auberge

6:15pm

Closing XP/ICGSE/ICSE/Open Jam Reception
This reception will offer attendees of XP2019, ICGSE, and ICSE an opportunity to network and to discuss topics inspired and captured by Open Jam throughout the conference.

Participation in the Closing Reception is included for XP attendees whose registration includes Saturday, May 25th and registrants to ICGSE (Int Conf Global Software Engineering). Other ICSE attendees may attend subject to a walk-in fee ($15 USD) to cover the cost of nibbles and sparkling water. A cash bar will also be available.

Saturday May 25, 2019 6:15pm - 8:00pm
XP Open Jam 2019.